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Pulmonary Embolism in Patients Hospitalized With COVID-19 (From a New York Health System).
Am J Cardiol ; 2020 Jul 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671949
ABSTRACT
Pulmonary embolisms (PEs) in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have increasingly been reported in observational studies. However, limited information describing their clinical characteristics and outcomes exists. Our study aims to describe clinical features and risk stratification strategies of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with PE. We retrospectively analyzed 101 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 infection and acute PE. Clinical outcomes measured were intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, bleeding and transfusion events, acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality. Pulmonary severity index (PESI) scores were used for risk stratification. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (50%), obesity (27%) and hyperlipidemia (32%) among this cohort. Baseline D-dimer abnormalities (4,647.0 ± 8,281.8) were noted on admission with a 3-fold increase at the time of PE diagnosis (13,288.4 ± 14,917.9; p <0.05). Five (5%) patients required systemic thrombolysis and 12 (12%) patients experienced moderate to severe bleeding. Thirty-one (31%) patients developed AKI and 1 (1%) patient required renal replacement therapy. Twenty-three (23%) patients were admitted to intensive care unit, of which 20 (20%) patients received mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 20%. Most patients (65%) had Intermediate to high risk PESI scores (>85), which portended a worse prognosis with higher mortality rate and length of stay. In conclusion, this study provides characteristics and early outcomes for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and acute pulmonary embolism. PESI scores were utilized for risk stratifying clinical outcomes. Our results should serve to alert the medical community to heighted vigilance of this VTE complication associated with COVID-19 infection.

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Texto completo: Disponible Base de datos: MEDLINE Tipo del documento: Artículo Tipo de estudio: Estudio pronostico Idioma: Inglés Aspecto clínico: Etiología / Pronóstico Año: 2020