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Adaptation, spread and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in farmed minks and related humans in the Netherlands
Lu Lu; Reina S. Sikkema; Francisca C. Velkers; David F. Nieuwenhuijse; Egil A.J. Fischer; Paola A. Meijer; Noortje Bouwmeester-Vincken; Ariene Rietveld; Marjolijn C.A. Wegdam-Blans; Paulien Tolsma; Marco Koppelman; Lidwien A.M. Smit; Renate W. Hakze-van der Honing; Wim H. M. van der Poel; Arco N. van der Spek; Marcel A. H. Spierenburg; Robert Jan Molenaar; Jan de Rond; Marieke Augustijn; Mark Woolhouse; Arjan J. Stegeman; Samantha Lycett; Bas B. Oude Munnink; Marion P. G. Koppelman.
  • Lu Lu; Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences & Informatics, Ashworth Laboratories, Kings Buildings, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Reina S. Sikkema; Erasmus MC, Department of Viroscience, WHO collaborating centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Francisca C. Velkers; Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • David F. Nieuwenhuijse; Erasmus MC, Department of Viroscience, WHO collaborating centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Egil A.J. Fischer; Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Paola A. Meijer; Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Noortje Bouwmeester-Vincken; Municipal Health Service GGD Limburg-Noord, Venlo, the Netherlands
  • Ariene Rietveld; Municipal Health Service GGD Hart voor Brabant, the Netherlands
  • Marjolijn C.A. Wegdam-Blans; Stichting PAMM, Veldhoven, the Netherlands
  • Paulien Tolsma; Municipal Health Service GGD Brabant-Zuidoost, Eindhoven, the Netherlands
  • Marco Koppelman; Sanquin Blood Supply Foundation, Amsterdam
  • Lidwien A.M. Smit; Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Renate W. Hakze-van der Honing; Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, Lelystad, the Netherlands
  • Wim H. M. van der Poel; Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, Lelystad, the Netherlands
  • Arco N. van der Spek; Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA), Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Marcel A. H. Spierenburg; Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA), Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Robert Jan Molenaar; GD Animal Health, Deventer, the Netherlands
  • Jan de Rond; GD Animal Health, Deventer, the Netherlands
  • Marieke Augustijn; GD Animal Health, Deventer, the Netherlands
  • Mark Woolhouse; Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences & Informatics, Ashworth Laboratories, Kings Buildings, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Arjan J. Stegeman; Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Samantha Lycett; Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Bas B. Oude Munnink; Erasmus MC, Department of Viroscience, WHO collaborating centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Marion P. G. Koppelman; Erasmus MC, Department of Viroscience, WHO collaborating centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Preprint Dans Anglais | bioRxiv | ID: ppbiorxiv-452160
Journal article
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ABSTRACT
In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (April 2020), SARS-CoV-2 was detected in farmed minks and genomic sequencing was performed on mink farms and farm personnel. Here, we describe the outbreak and use sequence data with Bayesian phylodynamic methods to explore SARS-CoV-2 transmission in minks and related humans on farms. High number of farm infections (68/126) in minks and farm related personnel (>50% of farms) were detected, with limited spread to the general human population. Three of five initial introductions of SARS-CoV-2 lead to subsequent spread between mink farms until November 2020. The largest cluster acquired a mutation in the receptor binding domain of the Spike protein (position 486), evolved faster and spread more widely and longer. Movement of people and distance between farms were statistically significant predictors of virus dispersal between farms. Our study provides novel insights into SARS-CoV-2 transmission between mink farms and highlights the importance of combing genetic information with epidemiological information at the animal-human interface.
Texte intégral: Disponible Collection: Preprints Base de données: bioRxiv langue: Anglais Année: 2021 Type de document: Preprint
Texte intégral: Disponible Collection: Preprints Base de données: bioRxiv langue: Anglais Année: 2021 Type de document: Preprint