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Impact of individual-level characteristics and transmission mitigation behaviors on SARS-CoV-2 infection and seroprevalence in a large Northern California Bay Area cohort
Cameron Adams; Mary Horton; Olivia Solomon; Marcus Wong; Sean L. Wu; Sophia Fuller; Xiaorong Shao; Indro Fedrigo; Hong Quach; Diana Quach; Michelle Meas; Luis Lopez; Abigail Broughton; Anna L. Barcellos; Joan Shim; Yusef Seymens; Samantha Hernandez; Magelda Montoya; Darrell M. Johnson; Kenneth Beckman; Michael P. Busch; Josefina Coloma; Joseph Lewnard; Eva Harris; Lisa F. Barcellos.
  • Cameron Adams; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Division of Biostatistics, School of Public He
  • Mary Horton; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Computational Biology Graduate Group, Universi
  • Olivia Solomon; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Computational Biology Graduate Group, Universi
  • Marcus Wong; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Infectious Disease and
  • Sean L. Wu; Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
  • Sophia Fuller; Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Xiaorong Shao; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Indro Fedrigo; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Hong Quach; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Diana Quach; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Michelle Meas; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Luis Lopez; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Abigail Broughton; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Anna L. Barcellos; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Joan Shim; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Yusef Seymens; Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics Laboratory, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Samantha Hernandez; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Magelda Montoya; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Darrell M. Johnson; University of Minnesota Genomics Center, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
  • Kenneth Beckman; University of Minnesota Genomics Center, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
  • Michael P. Busch; Vitalant Research Institute, San Francisco CA, 94118, USA
  • Josefina Coloma; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA
  • Joseph Lewnard; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Computational Biology Graduate Group, Universi
  • Eva Harris; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Infectious Disease and
  • Lisa F. Barcellos; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; Computational Biology Graduate Group, Universi
Preprint Dans Anglais | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21266871
Journal article
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ABSTRACT
Comprehensive data on transmission mitigation behaviors and both SARS-CoV-2 infection and serostatus are needed from large, community-based cohorts to identify COVID-19 risk factors and the impact of public health measures. From July 2020-March 2021, approximately 5,500 adults from the East Bay Area, California were followed over three data collection rounds to investigate the association between geographic and demographic characteristics and transmission mitigation behavior with SARS-CoV-2 prevalence. We estimated the populated-adjusted prevalence of antibodies from SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccination, and self-reported COVID-19 test positivity. Population-adjusted SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence was low, increasing from 1.03% (95% CI 0.50-1.96) in Round 1 (July-September 2020), to 1.37% (95% CI 0.75-2.39) in Round 2 (October-December 2020), to 2.18% (95% CI 1.48-3.17) in Round 3 (February-March 2021). Population-adjusted seroprevalence of COVID-19 vaccination was 21.64% (95% CI 19.20-24.34) in Round 3, with Whites having 4.35% (95% CI 0.35-8.32) higher COVID-19 vaccine seroprevalence than non-Whites. No evidence for an association between transmission mitigation behavior and seroprevalence was observed. Despite >99% of participants reporting wearing masks, non-Whites, lower-income, and lower-educated individuals had the highest SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and lowest vaccination seroprevalence. Results demonstrate that more effective policies are needed to address these disparities and inequities.
Texte intégral: Disponible Collection: Preprints Base de données: medRxiv langue: Anglais Année: 2021 Type de document: Preprint
Texte intégral: Disponible Collection: Preprints Base de données: medRxiv langue: Anglais Année: 2021 Type de document: Preprint