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1.
Immune Network ; : e24-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898576

ABSTRACT

Due to the inconsistent fluctuation of blood supply for transfusion, much attention has been paid to the development of artificial blood using other animals. Although mini-pigs are candidate animals, contamination of mini-pig T cells in artificial blood may cause a major safety concern. Therefore, it is important to analyze the cross-reactivity of IL-7, the major survival factor for T lymphocytes, between human, mouse, and mini-pig. Thus, we compared the protein sequences of IL-7 and found that porcine IL-7 was evolutionarily different from human IL-7. We also observed that when porcine T cells were cultured with either human or mouse IL-7, these cells did not increase the survival or proliferation compared to negative controls. These results suggest that porcine T cells do not recognize human or mouse IL-7 as their survival factor.

2.
Immune Network ; : e24-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890872

ABSTRACT

Due to the inconsistent fluctuation of blood supply for transfusion, much attention has been paid to the development of artificial blood using other animals. Although mini-pigs are candidate animals, contamination of mini-pig T cells in artificial blood may cause a major safety concern. Therefore, it is important to analyze the cross-reactivity of IL-7, the major survival factor for T lymphocytes, between human, mouse, and mini-pig. Thus, we compared the protein sequences of IL-7 and found that porcine IL-7 was evolutionarily different from human IL-7. We also observed that when porcine T cells were cultured with either human or mouse IL-7, these cells did not increase the survival or proliferation compared to negative controls. These results suggest that porcine T cells do not recognize human or mouse IL-7 as their survival factor.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875467

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#In this study, we tested whether mutations in the methylation pathway genes ten-eleven-translocation 2 (TET2) and DNA methyltransferase gene 3A (DNMT3A) improve the responses of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to decitabine. @*Methods@#We retrospectively sequenced the TET2 and DNMT3A genes from 70 patients diagnosed with de novo MDS between June 2008 and December 2011 and treated with a 5-day regimen of decitabine (290 cycles). We then analyzed treatment outcomes. @*Results@#Patients with hematological improvement survived longer than those without hematological improvement (22.9 months vs. 10.9 months, p = 0.006). Among the 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) carried TET2 or DNMT3A mutations. The baseline characteristics of patients with wild type or mutated genes were similar. Patients with mutations in TET2 or DNMT3A had a higher overall response rate than those with the wild type genes (82.3% vs. 46.6%, p = 0.023). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the TET2 or DMNT3A mutation status was associated with improved treatment responses and better overall survival among patients receiving decitabine. @*Conclusions@#These results demonstrate that TET2 mutations enhance the treatment response of MDS patients to hypomethylating agents like decitabine.

5.
Singapore medical journal ; : 287-296, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-827315

ABSTRACT

Preoperative anaemia is common in the Asia-Pacific. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a risk factor that can be addressed under patient blood management (PBM) Pillar 1, leading to reduced morbidity and mortality. We examined PBM implementation under four different healthcare systems, identified challenges and proposed several measures: (a) Test for anaemia once patients are scheduled for surgery. (b) Inform patients about risks of preoperative anaemia and benefits of treatment. (c) Treat IDA and replenish iron stores before surgery, using intravenous iron when oral treatment is ineffective, not tolerated or when rapid iron replenishment is needed; transfusion should not be the default management. (d) Harness support from multiple medical disciplines and relevant bodies to promote PBM implementation. (e) Demonstrate better outcomes and cost savings from reduced mortality and morbidity. Although PBM implementation may seem complex and daunting, it is feasible to start small. Implementing PBM Pillar 1, particularly in preoperative patients, is a sensible first step regardless of the healthcare setting.

6.
Blood Research ; : 137-143, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an exhausting process that impacts both the patient and caregiver. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, HSCT survivor-spouse caregiver matching study to determine quality of life (QoL) and depression among HSCT survivors and their caregivers. QoL and depression were measured with the World Health Organization Quality of Life: Brief Version (26 items) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, respectively. Data from 97 married couples were analyzed. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in overall QoL and psychological, social, and environmental health between survivors and spouse caregivers (P=0.345, 0.424, 0.415, and 0.253); however, physical QoL was better in the spouse caregiver group (P=0.011). There was no difference in mean depression scale scores (5.3 vs. 5.1, P=0.812) or proportion of severe depression (15.6% vs. 13.7%, P=0.270) between the two groups. We found that family income had a significant impact on overall QoL and environmental health among spouse caregivers (P=0.013 and 0.023), and female gender, co-morbidities, and family income were the important factors associated with depression among spouse caregivers (P=0.007, 0.017 and 0.049). CONCLUSION: This study found that there were no significant differences in QoL or level of depression between HSCT survivors and their spouse caregivers. Family income, gender, and co-morbidities showed significant association with spouse caregiver distress.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Depression , Environmental Health , Family Characteristics , Female , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Hematopoietic Stem Cells , Humans , Quality of Life , Spouses , Survivors , World Health Organization
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718335

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Molecular genetic abnormalities are observed in over 90% of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) cases. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the negative prognostic impact of ASXL1 mutations in CMML patients. We evaluated the prognostic impact of ASXL1 mutations and compared five CMML prognostic models in Korean patients with CMML. METHODS: We analyzed data from 36 of 57 patients diagnosed as having CMML from January 2000 to March 2016. ASXL1 mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing, and the clinical and laboratory features of patients were compared according to ASXL1 mutation status. RESULTS: ASXL1 mutations were detected in 18 patients (50%). There were no significant differences between the clinical and laboratory characteristics of ASXL1-mutated (ASXL1+) CMML and ASXL1-nonmutated (ASXL1−) CMML patients (all P>0.05). During the median follow-up of 14 months (range, 0–111 months), the overall survival (OS) of ASXL1+ CMML patients was significantly inferior to that of ASXL1− CMML patients with a median survival of 11 months and 19 months, respectively (log-rank P=0.049). An evaluation of OS according to the prognostic models demonstrated inferior survival in patients with a higher risk category according to the Mayo molecular model (log-rank P=0.001); the other scoring systems did not demonstrate a significant association with survival. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that ASXL1 mutations, occurring in half of the Korean CMML patients examined, were associated with inferior survival. ASXL1 mutation status needs to be determined for risk stratification in CMML.


Subject(s)
Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Korea , Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic , Models, Molecular , Molecular Biology
8.
Blood Research ; : 254-263, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-21833

ABSTRACT

Management options for patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have evolved substantially over the past decades. The American Society of Hematology published a treatment guideline for clinicians referring to the management of ITP in 2011. This evidence-based practice guideline for ITP enables the appropriate treatment of a larger proportion of patients and the maintenance of normal platelet counts. Korean authority operates a unified mandatory national health insurance system. Even though we have a uniform standard guideline enforced by insurance reimbursement, there are several unsolved issues in real practice in ITP treatment. To optimize the management of Korean ITP patients, the Korean Society of Hematology Aplastic Anemia Working Party (KSHAAWP) reviewed the consensus and the Korean data on the clinical practices of ITP therapy. Here, we report a Korean expert recommendation guide for the management of ITP.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Aplastic , Clothing , Consensus , Evidence-Based Practice , Hematology , Humans , Insurance , National Health Programs , Platelet Count , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic
9.
Blood Research ; : 207-211, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-38721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) often have concurrent aplastic anemia (AA). This study aimed to determine whether eculizumab-treated patients show clinical benefit regardless of concurrent AA. METHODS: We analyzed 46 PNH patients ≥18 years of age who were diagnosed by flow cytometry and treated with eculizumab for more than 6 months in the prospective Korean PNH registry. Patients were categorized into two groups: PNH patients with concurrent AA (PNH/AA, N=27) and without AA (classic PNH, N=19). Biochemical indicators of intravascular hemolysis, hematological laboratory values, transfusion requirement, and PNH-associated complications were assessed at baseline and every 6 months after initiation of eculizumab treatment. RESULTS: The median patient age was 46 years and median duration of eculizumab treatment was 34 months. Treatment with eculizumab induced rapid inhibition of hemolysis. At 6-month follow-up, LDH decreased to near normal levels in all patients; this effect was maintained until the 36-month follow-up regardless of concurrent AA. Transfusion independence was achieved by 53.3% of patients within the first 6 months of treatment and by 90.9% after 36 months of treatment. The mean number of RBC units transfused was significantly reduced, from 8.5 units during the 6 months prior to initiation of eculizumab to 1.6 units in the first 6 months of treatment, for the total study population; this effect was similar in both PNH/AA and classic PNH. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that eculizumab is beneficial in the management of patients with PNH/AA, similar to classic PNH.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Aplastic , Cohort Studies , Flow Cytometry , Follow-Up Studies , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal , Hemolysis , Humans , Prospective Studies
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-225588

ABSTRACT

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a progressive, systemic, life-threatening disease, characterized by chronic uncontrolled complement activation. A retrospective analysis of 301 Korean PNH patients who had not received eculizumab was performed to systematically identify the clinical symptoms and signs predictive of mortality. PNH patients with hemolysis (lactate dehydrogenase [LDH] > or = 1.5 x the upper limit of normal [ULN]) have a 4.8-fold higher mortality rate compared with the age- and sex-matched general population (P < 0.001). In contrast, patients with LDH < 1.5 x ULN have a similar mortality rate as the general population (P = 0.824). Thromboembolism (TE) (odds ratio [OR] 7.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] (3.052-16.562), renal impairment (OR, 2.953; 95% CI, 1.116-7.818) and PNH-cytopenia (OR, 2.547; 95% CI, 1.159-5.597) are independent risk factors for mortality, with mortality rates 14-fold (P < 0.001), 8-fold (P < 0.001), and 6.2-fold (P < 0.001) greater than that of the age- and sex-matched general population, respectively. The combination of hemolysis and 1 or more of the clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain, chest pain, or dyspnea, resulted in a much greater increased mortality rate when compared with patients with just the individual symptom alone or just hemolysis. Early identification of risk factors related to mortality is crucial for the management of PNH. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01224483.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Area Under Curve , Child , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/diagnosis , Hemolysis , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Diseases/complications , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , ROC Curve , Registries , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Thromboembolism/complications , Young Adult
11.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 460-463, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-101313

ABSTRACT

Here, we report on a 20-year-old patient with a primary nonseminomatous mediastinal germ cell tumor (MGCT) who developed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) 2 months following chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and paclitaxel. Bone marrow examinations revealed that the MDS was a refractory anemia with excess type II blasts and complex chromosomal abnormalities. With the onset of MDS occurring rapidly following chemotherapy, it is unlikely to have been caused by the therapy. We discuss the association between primary nonseminomatous MGCTs and hematological malignancies, including the possibility of a common clonal origin.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Refractory , Bone Marrow Examination , Chromosome Aberrations , Cisplatin , Drug Therapy , Etoposide , Germ Cells , Hematologic Neoplasms , Humans , Ifosfamide , Myelodysplastic Syndromes , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal , Paclitaxel , Young Adult
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-145155

ABSTRACT

Graves disease (GD) can lead to complications such as cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. Although dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP) has been occasionally reported in adults with GD, it is rare in children. We present the case of a 32-month-old boy with DCMP due to GD. He presented with irritability, vomiting, and diarrhea. He also had a history of weight loss over the past few months. On physical examination, he had tachycardia without fever, a mild diffuse goiter, and hepatomegaly. The chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary edema, while the echocardiography revealed a dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction (EF) of 28%. The thyroid function test (TFT) showed elevated serum T3 and decreased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. The TSH receptor autoantibody titer was elevated. He was diagnosed with DCMP with GD; treatment with methylprednisolone, diuretics, inotropics, and methimazole was initiated. The EF improved after the TFT normalized. At follow-up several months later, although the TFT results again showed evidence of hyperthyroidism, his EF had not deteriorated. His cardiac function continues to remain normal 1.5 months after treatment was started, although he still has elevated T3 and high TSH receptor antibody titer levels due to poor compliance with drug therapy. To summarize, we report a young child with GD-induced DCMP who recovered completely with medical therapy and, even though the hyperthyroidism recurred several months later, there was no relapse of the DCMP.


Subject(s)
Adult , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Cardiomegaly , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated , Child , Child, Preschool , Compliance , Deoxycytidine Monophosphate , Diarrhea , Diuretics , Drug Therapy , Echocardiography , Fever , Follow-Up Studies , Goiter , Graves Disease , Heart Failure , Heart Ventricles , Hepatomegaly , Humans , Hyperthyroidism , Male , Methimazole , Methylprednisolone , Physical Examination , Pulmonary Edema , Radiography, Thoracic , Receptors, Thyrotropin , Recurrence , Tachycardia , Thyroid Function Tests , Thyrotropin , Vomiting , Weight Loss
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-145143

ABSTRACT

Graves disease (GD) can lead to complications such as cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. Although dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP) has been occasionally reported in adults with GD, it is rare in children. We present the case of a 32-month-old boy with DCMP due to GD. He presented with irritability, vomiting, and diarrhea. He also had a history of weight loss over the past few months. On physical examination, he had tachycardia without fever, a mild diffuse goiter, and hepatomegaly. The chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary edema, while the echocardiography revealed a dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction (EF) of 28%. The thyroid function test (TFT) showed elevated serum T3 and decreased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. The TSH receptor autoantibody titer was elevated. He was diagnosed with DCMP with GD; treatment with methylprednisolone, diuretics, inotropics, and methimazole was initiated. The EF improved after the TFT normalized. At follow-up several months later, although the TFT results again showed evidence of hyperthyroidism, his EF had not deteriorated. His cardiac function continues to remain normal 1.5 months after treatment was started, although he still has elevated T3 and high TSH receptor antibody titer levels due to poor compliance with drug therapy. To summarize, we report a young child with GD-induced DCMP who recovered completely with medical therapy and, even though the hyperthyroidism recurred several months later, there was no relapse of the DCMP.


Subject(s)
Adult , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Cardiomegaly , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated , Child , Child, Preschool , Compliance , Deoxycytidine Monophosphate , Diarrhea , Diuretics , Drug Therapy , Echocardiography , Fever , Follow-Up Studies , Goiter , Graves Disease , Heart Failure , Heart Ventricles , Hepatomegaly , Humans , Hyperthyroidism , Male , Methimazole , Methylprednisolone , Physical Examination , Pulmonary Edema , Radiography, Thoracic , Receptors, Thyrotropin , Recurrence , Tachycardia , Thyroid Function Tests , Thyrotropin , Vomiting , Weight Loss
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-200225

ABSTRACT

We assessed the success rate of empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole and evaluated risk factors for predicting the failure of empirical antifungal therapy. A multicenter, prospective, observational study was performed in patients with hematological malignancies who had neutropenic fever and received empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole at 22 centers. A total of 391 patients who had abnormal findings on chest imaging tests (31.0%) or a positive result of enzyme immunoassay for serum galactomannan (17.6%) showed a 56.5% overall success rate. Positive galactomannan tests before the initiation of the empirical antifungal therapy (P=0.026, hazard ratio [HR], 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-4.69) and abnormal findings on the chest imaging tests before initiation of the empirical antifungal therapy (P=0.022, HR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.11-3.71) were significantly associated with poor outcomes for the empirical antifungal therapy. Eight patients (2.0%) had premature discontinuation of itraconazole therapy due to toxicity. It is suggested that positive galactomannan tests and abnormal findings on the chest imaging tests at the time of initiation of the empirical antifungal therapy are risk factors for predicting the failure of the empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole. (Clinical Trial Registration on National Cancer Institute website, NCT01060462)


Subject(s)
14-alpha Demethylase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antifungal Agents/adverse effects , Aspergillosis/complications , Candidiasis/complications , Coccidioidomycosis/complications , Febrile Neutropenia/complications , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Humans , Itraconazole/adverse effects , Male , Mannans/blood , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-216016

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) occur as late complications of cytotoxic therapy. This study reviewed clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of patients with t-MN at a single institution in Korea. METHODS: The study subjects included 39 consecutive patients diagnosed with t-MN. Each subject's clinical history of previous diseases, treatments, and laboratory data was reviewed, including cytogenetics. The primary diagnosis was hematologic malignancy in 14 patients and solid tumor in 25 patients. RESULTS: Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML, 66.7%) was found to be more common than therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS). Primary hematologic malignancies that were commonly implicated included mature B-cell neoplasm and acute leukemia. Breast cancer was the most common primary solid tumor. The mean time interval from cytotoxic therapy initiation to t-MN detection was 49 months. Chromosomal aberrations were observed in 35 patients, and loss of chromosome 5, 7, or both accounted for 41% of all cases. Balanced rearrangements occurred in 13 patients; these patients showed shorter latency intervals (mean, 38 months) than patients with loss of chromosome 5 or 7 (mean, 61 months). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we determined the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of Korean patients with t-MN. Although our results were generally consistent with those of previous reports, we found that t-MN resulting from de novo leukemia was common and that t-AML was more common than t-MDS at presentation. Multi-institutional studies involving a larger number of patients and additional parameters are required to investigate the epidemiology, genetic predisposition, and survival rate of t-MN in Korea.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Bone Marrow/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Chromosome Aberrations , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5 , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7 , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Humans , Karyotyping , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/diagnosis , Neoplasms, Second Primary/diagnosis , Republic of Korea , Young Adult
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-221307

ABSTRACT

Many Korean patients with transfusion-induced iron overload experience serious clinical sequelae, including organ damage, and require lifelong chelation therapy. However, due to a lack of compliance and/or unavailability of an appropriate chelator, most patients have not been treated effectively. Deferasirox (DFX), a once-daily oral iron chelator for both adult and pediatric patients with transfusion-induced iron overload, is now available in Korea. The effectiveness of deferasirox in reducing or maintaining body iron has been demonstrated in many studies of patients with a variety of transfusion-induced anemias such as myelodysplastic syndromes, aplastic anemia, and other chronic anemias. The recommended initial daily dose of DFX is 20 mg/kg body weight, taken on an empty stomach at least 30 min before food and serum ferritin levels should be maintained below 1000 ng/mL. To optimize the management of transfusion-induced iron overload, the Korean Society of Hematology Aplastic Anemia Working Party (KSHAAWP) reviewed the general consensus on iron overload and the Korean data on the clinical benefits of iron chelation therapy, and developed a Korean guideline for the treatment of iron overload.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Aplastic/therapy , Benzoates/therapeutic use , Blood Transfusion/adverse effects , Chelation Therapy/methods , Humans , Iron Chelating Agents/therapeutic use , Iron Overload/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Republic of Korea , Triazoles/therapeutic use
19.
Blood Research ; : 87-98, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-74592

ABSTRACT

Azacitidine is recommended for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who are not eligible for intensive therapy or for patients with lower-risk MDS who have thrombocytopenia or neutropenia or have anemia that is unresponsive to other therapies. However, standard treatment with azacitidine has not been optimized and many issues about the use of azacitidine remain unresolved. The use of azacitidine is expanding rapidly, but limited comparative clinical trial data are available to (i) define the optimal use of azacitidine in patients with higher-risk MDS or around the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, (ii) identify those patients with lower-risk MDS who may benefit from treatment, and (iii) guide physicians on alternative therapies after treatment failure. Increasing evidence suggests that the clinical features, prognostic factors, and cytogenetic profiles of patients with MDS in Asia differ significantly from those of patients in Western countries, so the aim of this review is to summarize the evidence and provide practical recommendations on the use of azacitidine in patients with MDS in the Republic of Korea. Evidence considered in this review is based on published clinical data and on the clinical experience of an expert panel from the acute myeloid leukemia/MDS Working Party of the Korean Society of Hematology.


Subject(s)
Anemia , Asia , Azacitidine , Complementary Therapies , Cytogenetics , Hematology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Myelodysplastic Syndromes , Neutropenia , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Republic of Korea , Thrombocytopenia , Treatment Failure
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-720313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is one of the major complications encountered by patients receiving chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. The prolonged period of intense immunosuppression following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may increase the risk of IPA recurrence in patients with a history of IPA. We evaluated the impact of a history of IPA on allogeneic HSCT outcome, and examined the incidence of IPA after HSCT. METHODS: This retrospective study included 22 patients with a history of IPA prior to receiving allogeneic HSCT at the Samsung Medical Center from 1995 to 2007. Diagnosis of IPA was defined as proven (N=5), probable (N=0), or possible (N=17). RESULTS: All 22 patients received amphotericin-based regimens to treat pre-transplant IPA. Secondary antifungal prophylaxis was administered to 10 patients during HSCT. The development of post-transplant IPA was observed in 2 patients. One of the patients died from septic shock within 2 days of the diagnosis of possible IPA. The other patient recovered from IPA, but eventually had a relapse of the primary disease. Of the 22 patients, the overall 2-year survival rate was 63% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 41-85), and the transplant-related mortality rate was 19% (95% CI: 0-38). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a history of IPA prior to HSCT does not have an adverse impact on transplant outcomes, although the small number of cases was a limitation in this study. Future studies involving a larger number of cases are needed to further examine this issue.


Subject(s)
Hematologic Neoplasms , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Hematopoietic Stem Cells , Humans , Immunosuppression , Incidence , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Shock, Septic , Survival Rate , Transplants
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