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1.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 243-252, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1002948

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is increasing in South Korea. On the other hand, there are no reports of the incidence and prevalence of IBD specific to Jeju Island, prompting the necessity of this study. @*Methods@#In this retrospective design, the medical records of 453 patients diagnosed with IBD at Jeju National University Hospital from January 1990 to December 2019 were analyzed. @*Results@#Of the 453 IBD subjects (165 CD, 288 UC) included, the UC: CD ratio was 1.75:1. The incidence of IBD increased continuously from 0.19/105 in 1990 to 6.39/105 in 2017 and after that decreased to 4.92/105 in 2019. The male:female ratio was 2.24:1 for CD and 1.29:1 for UC. In the CD subjects, the disease activity included remission (33.3%), mild (25.5%), moderate (30.9%), and severe (6.1%). In UC subjects, the disease activity included remission (24.0%), mild (35.4%), moderate (28.8%), and severe (6.2%). According to the Montreal classification, the cases were as follows: CD: terminal ileum (22.4%), colon (9.7%), ileocolon (66.1%), and upper gastrointestinal involvement (27.3%), and perianal fistula/abscess was present in 43.6% of subjects before or at diagnosis: UC: proctitis (43.4%), left-sided colitis (29.1%), and pancolitis (23.3%) at diagnosis. @*Conclusions@#The incidence of IBD on Jeju Island has increased steadily for approximately 30 years but has exhibited a decline since 2017. Therefore, the incidence of IBD in Jeju is believed to have plateaued. Further study will be needed for clarification. (Korean J Gastroenterol 2023;81:243-252)

2.
Intestinal Research ; : 20-42, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-967000

ABSTRACT

Colonoscopic polypectomy is effective in decreasing the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC). Premalignant polyps discovered during colonoscopy are associated with the risk of metachronous advanced neoplasia. Postpolypectomy surveillance is the most important method for managing advanced metachronous neoplasia. A more efficient and evidence-based guideline for postpolypectomy surveillance is required because of the limited medical resources and concerns regarding colonoscopy complications. In these consensus guidelines, an analytic approach was used to address all reliable evidence to interpret the predictors of CRC or advanced neoplasia during surveillance colonoscopy. The key recommendations state that the high-risk findings for metachronous CRC following polypectomy are as follows: adenoma ≥10 mm in size; 3 to 5 (or more) adenomas; tubulovillous or villous adenoma; adenoma containing high-grade dysplasia; traditional serrated adenoma; sessile serrated lesion containing any grade of dysplasia; serrated polyp of at least 10 mm in size; and 3 to 5 (or more) sessile serrated lesions. More studies are needed to fully comprehend the patients who are most likely to benefit from surveillance colonoscopy and the ideal surveillance interval to prevent metachronous CRC.

3.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 267-272, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-968682

ABSTRACT

The abscess is a common complication of Crohn’s disease (CD), with the perianal form more frequent than gluteal or presacral which is relatively rare. There are few case reports of gluteal abscess combined with presacral abscess caused by CD and the treatment has not been established. A 21-year-old male was admitted with right buttock and lower back pain with a duration of 3 months. He had a history of CD in the small intestine diagnosed 10 months previously. He had poor compliance and had not returned for follow-up care during the previous 6 months. Abdominopelvic CT indicated newly developed multiple abscess pockets in right gluteal region, including piriformis muscle and presacral space. Additionally, fistula tracts between small bowel loops and presacral space were observed. Patient’s CD was moderate activity (273.12 on the Crohn’s Disease Activity Index [CDAI]). Treatment was started with piperacillin/tazobactam antibiotic but patient developed a fever and abscess extent was aggravated. Therefore, surgical incision and drainage was performed and 4 Penrose drains were inserted. Patient’s pain and fever were resolved following surgery. Infliximab was then administered for the remaining fistulas. After the induction regimen, multiple fistula tracts improved and patient went into remission (CDAI was -0.12).

4.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 49-51, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-918967

ABSTRACT

Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Gastric Cancer: Population-based Cohort Study

5.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 191-193, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926957

ABSTRACT

Gastric Per-oral Endoscopic Myotomy (G-POEM) for Refractory Gastroparesis: Results from an International Prospective Trial

6.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 4-8, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834070

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the worldwide pandemic of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) On March 11, 2020, just three months after the first outbreak of COVID-19 caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in China in December 2019. COVID-19 is a contagious disease that can affect anyone, anytime, anywhere, and has had a huge impact on our lives, including social, economic, educational, and cultural life. In this paper, I would like to explore the issues related to COVID-19 in the gastroenterology and share the experiences of domestic and overseas gastroenterologists, and ultimately to seek ways to effectively prepare for and cope with the pandemic era of COVID-19.

8.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 239-241, 2019.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742154

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Cellulitis
9.
The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research ; : 127-131, 2019.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761574

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of people presenting with fish bone foreign body (FFB) is high in Asian countries, including Korea, and coastal areas around the world. Pointed linear-shaped FFBs are common in the oral cavity and upper esophageal sphincter, whereas large flat bones are more common FFBs in the esophagus. If the FFB is not found on endoscopy, residual foreign body sensation or embedded FFB is possible. In such cases, CT is helpful. However, in the case of totally embedded FFB, not only preoperative diagnosis but also localization during operation or surgery is important. If these are not performed, the initial incision site or operation method would be difficult to determine. For this purpose, no standard guideline has been established yet. We report a case of upper esophageal sphincter-embedded FFB diagnosed using CT rather than endoscopy. The bone was successfully localized using conventional ultrasonography during the operation and then removed surgically.


Subject(s)
Humans , Asian People , Diagnosis , Endoscopy , Esophageal Sphincter, Upper , Esophagus , Foreign Bodies , Korea , Methods , Mouth , Pharynx , Prevalence , Sensation , Ultrasonography
10.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 1-5, 2018.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715647

ABSTRACT

The most common cause of esophageal foreign bodies in adults is meat in Western countries and fish bones in Asian countries, including Korea. Although most ingested foreign bodies pass spontaneously through the esophagus without any clinical sequelae, some sharp foreign bodies, such as fish bones embedded in the esophagus, require treatment. Endoscopic management is the first choice in the treatment of esophageal foreign bodies because it is quite safe and effective. Major complications occur as a result of esophageal perforation; in particular, sharp foreign bodies, such as fish bones, are more likely to cause perforation. Complications include mediastinitis, paraesophageal abscess, pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, tracheoesophagal fistula, aortoesophageal fistula, aspiration, and asphyxia. Unnecessary delays should be avoided in endoscopic intervention for esophageal foreign bodies to prevent complications.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Abscess , Asian People , Asphyxia , Esophageal Perforation , Esophagus , Fistula , Foreign Bodies , Korea , Meat , Mediastinal Emphysema , Mediastinitis , Pneumothorax , Subcutaneous Emphysema
11.
The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research ; : 61-64, 2018.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738950

ABSTRACT

A 20-year-old Cambodian male living in Korea for 2 years as a foreign worker visited our gastroenterology outpatient clinic. He had a small farm in Cambodia. He complained of postprandial upper abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting for 2 years. Gastroduodenoscopy showed hyperemic mucosa near the major papilla in the duodenum and two small and slender reddish worms. These were removed with endoscopic biopsy forceps. Under microscopy, these were identified as Ancylostoma duodenale by the characteristic morphology of 2 pairs of cutting teeth in the buccal cavity and 3 lobes in the copulatory bursa. After removal of two worms, his symptom improved. Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) present a global health problem. In the Republic of Korea, STH, including hookworms, were highly prevalent until the 1970s. With mass fecal examination followed by selective mass chemotherapy with anthelmintics from 1969 to 1995, the prevalence of STH has rapidly decreased since the 1980s. Since 2004, no hookworms have been found in nationwide surveys on the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection. Therefore, we report a case of in vivo endoscopic removal of A. duodenale in a patient with abdominal pain.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Young Adult , Abdominal Pain , Agriculture , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Ancylostoma , Ancylostomatoidea , Anthelmintics , Asian People , Biopsy , Cambodia , Drug Therapy , Duodenum , Endoscopy , Gastroenterology , Global Health , Helminths , Korea , Microscopy , Mucous Membrane , Nausea , Parasitic Diseases , Prevalence , Republic of Korea , Surgical Instruments , Tooth , Vomiting
12.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 297-300, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-165380

ABSTRACT

A perirectal abscess is a relatively common disease entity that occurs as a postsurgical complication or as a result of various medical conditions. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage was recently described as a promising alternative treatment. Previous reports have recommended placement of a drainage catheter through the anus for irrigation, which is inconvenient to the patient and carries a risk of accidental dislodgement. We report four cases of perirectal abscess that were successfully treated with only one or two 7 F double pigtail plastic stent placements and without a drainage catheter for irrigation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Abscess , Anal Canal , Catheters , Drainage , Endosonography , Plastics , Stents , Ultrasonography
13.
Biomolecules & Therapeutics ; : 315-320, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-160698

ABSTRACT

We investigated the role of autophagy in SNUC5/5-FUR, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant SNUC5 colon cancer cells. SNUC5/5-FUR cells exhibited low level of autophagy, as determined by light microscopy, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry following acridine orange staining, and the decreased level of GFP-LC3 puncta. In addition, expression of critical autophagic proteins such as Atg5, Beclin-1 and LC3-II and autophagic flux was diminished in SNUC5/5-FUR cells. Whereas production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly elevated in SNUC5/5-FUR cells, treatment with the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl cysteine further reduced the level of autophagy. Taken together, these results indicate that decreased autophagy is linked to 5-FU resistance in SNUC5 colon cancer cells.


Subject(s)
Acridine Orange , Autophagy , Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Cysteine , Flow Cytometry , Fluorouracil , Microscopy , Microscopy, Confocal , Reactive Oxygen Species
14.
Intestinal Research ; : 380-387, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-41224

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), has been reported to have various ophthalmologic manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of ophthalmologic manifestations associated with IBD in Korea. METHODS: Sixty-one patients were examined between May 2013 and October 2014. We performed complete ophthalmologic examinations. RESULTS: Findings included 36 patients with CD and 25 with UC. The mean age of the patients was 34±16 years and disease duration was 45.3±23.9 months. Ophthalmologic manifestations were positive in 44 cases. Primary complication was diagnosed in 5 cases, as follows; iritis in 2 cases, episcleritis in one case, iritis with optic neuritis in 1 case, and serous retinal detachment in 1 case, without secondary complications. The most common coincidental complication was dry eye syndrome (DES), in 35 patients (57.4%). The prevalence of DES in the control group was 21.3%. The proportion of DES in patients with IBD was significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmologic manifestations were high (72.1%) in IBD patients. Clinically significant primary ocular inflammation occurred in 8.2% of patients. The most common complication was DES. There was a higher rate of DES in patients with IBD compared to the control group. Evaluation of the eye should be a routine component in patients with IBD.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Dry Eye Syndromes , Inflammation , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Iritis , Korea , Ophthalmology , Optic Neuritis , Prevalence , Retinal Detachment , Scleritis
15.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 198-206, 2016.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-165882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) accounts for 5% of all gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases. Dynamic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row CT (DCE-MDCT) is not generally recommended in OGIB patients due to its low sensitivity. However, it can be used to quickly and simply diagnose OGIB according to some guidelines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of DCE-MDCT in OGIB patients. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 362 patients who underwent DCE-MDCT between March 2009 and January 2014. A total of 45 patients diagnosed with OGIB were included in this study. Their baseline characteristics and treatment procedure were analyzed retrospectively. The positive rates of DCE-MDCT for the detection of bleeding and associated factors were assessed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 59 years, and males represented 51.1%. Melena was the most common symptom (44.4%). Positive rate of DCE-MDCT findings was 20.0% (9/45). Among these patients, intraluminal contrast extravasation was found in 5 patients (55.6%) and intraluminal hematoma or mass lesions were found in 2 patients each (22.2%). Thirty nine patients (86.7%) underwent conservative management, and 6 patients (13.3%) underwent specific treatment, such as endoscopic treatment, embolization, or surgery. Patients who showed positivity in DCE-MDCT more frequently received specific treatment compared with those who were negative (44.4% vs. 5.6%, p=0.010). CONCLUSIONS: Although DCE-MDCT showed a low positive rate (20.0%), positive findings of DCE-MDCT could lead to specific treatment. Positive DCE-MDCT findings play a useful role in the management of patients with OGIB.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Colonoscopy , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Melena/etiology , Multidetector Computed Tomography , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies
16.
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology ; : 183-187, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-46324

ABSTRACT

Recent studies suggest that liver cirrhosis is reversible after administering oral nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy to patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, few studies have addressed whether esophageal varices can regress after such therapy. We report a case of complete regression of esophageal varices during entecavir therapy in patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis, suggesting that complications of liver cirrhosis such as esophageal varices can regress after the long-term suppression of HBV replication.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Abdomen/diagnostic imaging , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , DNA, Viral/blood , Esophageal and Gastric Varices/complications , Guanine/analogs & derivatives , Hepatitis B virus/genetics , Hepatitis B, Chronic/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Ultrasonography
17.
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology ; : 390-395, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-188160

ABSTRACT

Some recent studies have found regression of liver cirrhosis after antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis, but there have been no reports of complete regression of esophageal varices after interferon/peg-interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We describe two cases of complete regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly after interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly regressed after 3 and 8 years of sustained virologic responses in cases 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that complications of liver cirrhosis, such as esophageal varices and splenomegaly, can regress after antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Abdomen/diagnostic imaging , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Therapy, Combination , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Esophageal and Gastric Varices/complications , Hepatitis C/complications , Interferon-alpha/therapeutic use , Liver Cirrhosis/etiology , Polyethylene Glycols/therapeutic use , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , Ribavirin/therapeutic use , Splenomegaly/complications , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography
18.
Gut and Liver ; : 80-86, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-61571

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serologic activity marker in Crohn's disease (CD), but it may be less useful in evaluating CD activity in ileal CD patients. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of CRP as a disease activity marker in CD according to disease location. METHODS: Korean CD patients in a single hospital were evaluated. Factors associated with elevated CRP concentration at the time of diagnosis of CD and the association between the physician's prediction regarding upcoming surgery and the sites of the lesions directly related to surgery were analyzed. RESULTS: Of 435 CD patients, 25.7%, 6.9%, and 67.4% had ileal, colonic, and ileocolonic CD, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, reduced serum albumin, CD activity index (CDAI) >220, and ileocolonic/colonic location were associated with an elevated CRP level and that the CRP level was significantly correlated with the CDAI in all CD patients (gamma=0.466, p<0.01). However, the correlation coefficient was dependent on the location, with values of 0.395, 0.456, and 0.527 in patients with an ileal, ileocolonic, and colonic disease location, respectively. Surgery for ileal lesions was less predictable than surgery for ileocolonic or colonic lesions during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: CRP is less useful as a disease activity marker in patients with ileal CD than those with ileocolonic or colonic CD.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Colon/pathology , Crohn Disease/blood , Ileum/pathology , Serum Albumin/analysis , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Kidney Research and Clinical Practice ; : 180-184, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-179034

ABSTRACT

A 61-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of generalized edema and proteinuria. Her renal function deteriorated rapidly. Serum immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal ranges. An autoantibody examination showed negative for antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Histologic examination of a renal biopsy specimen revealed that all of the glomeruli had severe crescent formations with no immune deposits. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy with cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone. Fifteen days later, she experienced massive recurrent hematochezia. Angiography revealed an active contrast extravasation in a branch of the distal ileal artery. We selectively embolized with a permanent embolic agent. On the 45th hospital day, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Brain computed tomography showed intracerebral hemorrhage. We report a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhage.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Angiography , Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic , Antibodies, Antinuclear , Arteries , Biopsy , Brain , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Complement System Proteins , Consciousness , Cyclophosphamide , Cytoplasm , Edema , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage , Glomerulonephritis , Hemorrhage , Immunoglobulins , Prednisolone , Proteinuria , Reference Values , Vasculitis
20.
Intestinal Research ; : 153-159, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-144344

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Previous studies have suggested a weak correlation between self-reported rectal effluent status and bowel preparation quality. We aim to evaluate whether photographic examples of rectal effluents could improve the correlation between patient descriptions of rectal effluents and bowel preparation quality. METHODS: Before colonoscopy, patients were asked to describe the nature of their last three rectal effluents. Photographic examples of rectal effluents were provided as a reference for scoring. Bowel preparation was subsequently assessed by a single endoscopist using a global preparation assessment scale. Preparation outcomes were grouped into two levels (excellent to good vs. fair to inadequate). Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to find any association between bowel preparation quality and patient characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 138 patients completed the questionnaires. The mean age was 56.5+/-10.4 years. The mean sum of the last three rectal effluent scores was 5.9+/-2.0. Higher rectal effluent scores (odds ratio [OR], 0.82; P=0.043) and the presence of diverticula (OR, 0.16; P<0.001) were risk factors for suboptimal preparation. CONCLUSIONS: Photographic example-guided patient descriptions of rectal effluents showed a statistically significant association with bowel preparation quality. However, clinical significance seemed to be low. The presence of diverticula was an independent predictive factor for suboptimal bowel preparation quality.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colonoscopy , Diverticulum , Logistic Models , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
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