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1.
Electron. j. biotechnol ; 45: 30-37, May 15, 2020. ilus, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1177412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restrained to the species grown in pure culture. The development of culture-independent techniques over the last decade allows scientists to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. Metagenomics is the study of complex genome by the isolation of DNA of the whole community. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of metagenomic DNA gives information about the microbial and taxonomical characterization of a particular niche. The objective of the present research is to study the microbial and taxonomical characterization of the metagenomic DNA, isolated from the frozen soil sample of a glacier in the north western Himalayas through NGS. RESULTS: The glacier community comprised of 16 phyla with the representation of members belonging to Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The number of genes annotated through the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), GO, Pfam, Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs), and FIG databases were generated by COGNIZER. The annotation of genes assigned in each group from the metagenomics data through COG database and the number of genes annotated in different pathways through KEGG database were reported. CONCLUSION: Results indicate that the glacier soil taken in the present study, harbors taxonomically and metabolically diverse communities. The major bacterial group present in the niche is Proteobacteria followed by Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, etc. Different genes were annotated through COG and KEGG databases that integrate genomic, chemical, and systemic functional information.


Subject(s)
Soil Microbiology , Bacteria/classification , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Microbiota/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Cold Climate , Computational Biology , Ice Cover , Metagenomics , Genome, Microbial , India
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-878672

ABSTRACT

Objective To investigate the correlation between serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D[T-25(OH)D]level and fecal microbiota in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD). Methods Twenty-three patients with IBD completed the tests for serum T-25(OH)D,and the fecal microbiota was studied using V4 hypervariable region of 16S ribosomal RNA(rRNA)gene sequencing.According to serum T-25(OH)D level,the patients were divided into three groups including vitamin D normal group(


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , Feces/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/microbiology , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Vitamin D/blood
3.
Braz. j. biol ; 79(2): 191-200, Apr.-June 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989448

ABSTRACT

Abstract The hygienic and sanitary control in Food and Nutrition Units (FNU) is considered a standard procedure to produce adequate meals and reduce the risk of foodborne diseases and hospital infections. This study aimed to evaluate the isolation and identification of bacteria from equipment and food contact surfaces in a hospital FNU as well as to evaluate the sanitary condition. Likewise, it was analyzed the adhesion of the microorganisms on polyethylene cutting boards. The presence of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms, yeasts, molds, coagulase-positive staphylococci, coliform and fecal coliform, and Escherichia coli were analyzed on eating tables, countertop surfaces and cutting boards used for meat or vegetable handling, and equipment such as microwaves and refrigerators. The molecular identification it was done by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The adhesion of the microorganisms (biofilm formation) on meat and vegetable cutting boards was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed high numbers of all microorganisms, except for E. coli , which was not observed in the samples. The molecular analysis identified species of the Enterobacteriaceae family and species of the Pseudomonadaceae family. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed bacterial adhesion on the cutting board surfaces. The results obtained in this study indicated that the hygienic conditions of surfaces like plastic cutting boards and equipment in this hospital FNU were inadequate. The achievement and application of standard operating procedures could positively help in the standardization of sanitary control, reducing the microbial contamination and providing a safe food to hospitalized patients.


Resumo O controle higiênico e sanitário nas Unidades de Alimentação e Nutrição (UAN) é considerado um procedimento padrão para produzir refeições adequadas e reduzir o risco de doenças transmitidas pelos alimentos e infecções hospitalares. Este estudo teve como objetivo isolar e identificar bactérias de equipamentos e superfícies de contato com alimentos em uma UAN hospitalar, bem como avaliar a condição sanitária. Do mesmo modo, analisou-se a adesão dos micro-organismos em tábuas de corte de polietileno. A presença de micro-organismos aeróbios mesófilos, leveduras, fungos, Sthapylococcus coagulase-positivos, coliformes, coliformes fecais e Escherichia coli foi analisadas na superfície de mesas do refeitório, superfícies de bancada e tábuas de corte usadas para manuseio de carne ou vegetais e, em equipamentos como micro-ondas e refrigeradores. A identificação molecular foi feita pelo sequenciamento do gene 16S rRNA. A adesão dos micro-organismos (formação de biofilmes) em tábuas de corte de carne e de vegetais também foi avaliada por microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Os resultados mostraram elevada contagem para todos os micro-organismos analisados, exceto para E. coli, a qual não foi observada nas amostras. A análise molecular identificou espécies da família Enterobacteriaceae e Pseudomonadaceae. A análise de microscopia eletrônica de varredura revelaram adesão bacteriana nas superfícies das placsa de corte. Os resultados obtidos neste estudo indicaram que as condições higiênicas das superfícies e de equipamentos nesta UAN hospitalar estavam inadequadas. A aplicação de procedimentos operacionais padrão poderia auxiliar positivamente na padronização do controle higiênico-sanitário, reduzindo a contaminação microbiana e fornecendo um alimento seguro para pacientes hospitalizados.


Subject(s)
Humans , Environmental Microbiology , Molecular Typing , Food Microbiology , Food Service, Hospital/trends , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Biofilms , Fungi/isolation & purification , Fungi/classification , Fungi/genetics
4.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(4): 742-748, Oct.-Dec. 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974296

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT We examined microbial communities from enriched fine and retorted shale particles using sequencing of V4 variable region of 16S rRNA. High number of microbial genera was found in both enriched shale by-products that were dominate by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, showing differences due to microbial colonization after the pyrolysis process.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Waste Products/analysis , Geologic Sediments/microbiology , Microbiota , Phylogeny , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Brazil , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Geologic Sediments/chemistry , Biodiversity
5.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(4): 714-722, Oct.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974304

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Carnivorous plant species, such as Utricularia spp., capture and digest prey. This digestion can occur through the secretion of plant digestive enzymes and/or by bacterial digestive enzymes. To comprehend the physiological mechanisms of carnivorous plants, it is essential to understand the microbial diversity related to these plants. Therefore, in the present study, we isolated and classified bacteria from different organs of Utricularia breviscapa (stolons and utricles) and from different geographic locations (São Paulo and Mato Grosso). We were able to build the first bacterium collection for U. breviscapa and study the diversity of cultivable bacteria. The results show that U. breviscapa bacterial diversity varied according to the geographic isolation site (São Paulo and Mato Grosso) but not the analyzed organs (utricle and stolon). We reported that six genera were common to both sample sites (São Paulo and Mato Grosso). These genera have previously been reported to be beneficial to plants, as well as related to the bioremediation process, showing that these isolates present great biotechnological and agricultural potential. This is the first report of an Acidobacteria isolated from U. breviscapa. The role of these bacteria inside the plant must be further investigated in order to understand their population dynamics within the host.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Magnoliopsida/microbiology , Biodiversity , Phylogeny , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/growth & development , Bacteria/genetics , Brazil , Floods
6.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(4): 757-769, Oct.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974306

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Anthropogenic activity, such as accidental oil spills, are typical sources of urban mangrove pollution that may affect mangrove bacterial communities as well as their mobile genetic elements. To evaluate remediation strategies, we followed over the time the effects of a petroleum hydrocarbon degrading consortium inoculated on mangrove tree Avicennia schaueriana against artificial petroleum contamination in a phytoremediation greenhouse experiment. Interestingly, despite plant protection due to the inoculation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from the total community DNA indicated that the different treatments did not significantly affect the bacterial community composition. However, while the bacterial community was rather stable, pronounced shifts were observed in the abundance of bacteria carrying plasmids. A PCR-Southern blot hybridization analysis indicated an increase in the abundance of IncP-9 catabolic plasmids. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of naphthalene dioxygenase (ndo) genes amplified from cDNA (RNA) indicated the dominance of a specific ndo gene in the inoculated petroleum amendment treatment. The petroleum hydrocarbon degrading consortium characterization indicated the prevalence of bacteria assigned to Pseudomonas spp., Comamonas spp. and Ochrobactrum spp. IncP-9 plasmids were detected for the first time in Comamonas sp. and Ochrobactrum spp., which is a novelty of this study.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/metabolism , Avicennia/microbiology , Hydrocarbons/metabolism , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/metabolism , Soil Pollutants/analysis , Soil Pollutants/metabolism , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Biodegradation, Environmental , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Petroleum/analysis , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Petroleum Pollution/analysis , Avicennia/metabolism , Rhizosphere
7.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(4): 770-776, Oct.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974307

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Anaerobic digestion is important for the management of livestock manure with high ammonia level. Although ammonia effects on anaerobic digestion have been comprehensively studied, the molecular mechanism underlying ammonia inhibition still remains elusive. In this study, based on metatranscriptomic analysis, the transcriptional profile of microbial community in anaerobic digestion under low (1500 mg L-1) and high NH4 + (5000 mg L-1) concentrations, respectively, were revealed. The results showed that high NH4 + concentrations significantly inhibited methane production but facilitated the accumulations of volatile fatty acids. The expression of methanogenic pathway was significantly inhibited by high NH4 + concentration but most of the other pathways were not significantly affected. Furthermore, the expressions of methanogenic genes which encode acetyl-CoA decarbonylase and methyl-coenzyme M reductase were significantly inhibited by high NH4 + concentration. The inhibition of the co-expressions of the genes which encode acetyl-CoA decarbonylase was observed. Some genes involved in the pathways of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis and ribosome were highly expressed under high NH4 + concentration. Consequently, the ammonia inhibition on anaerobic digestion mainly focused on methanogenic process by suppressing the expressions of genes which encode acetyl-CoA decarbonylase and methyl-coenzyme M reductase. This study improved the accuracy and depth of understanding ammonia inhibition on anaerobic digestion.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/metabolism , Ammonia/metabolism , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Transcription, Genetic , Bioreactors/microbiology , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Microbiota , Anaerobiosis , Methane/metabolism
8.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(3): 443-451, July-Sept. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951793

ABSTRACT

Abstract As a glacier retreats, barren areas are exposed, and these barren areas are ideal sites to study microbial succession. In this study, we characterized the soil culturable bacterial communities and biochemical parameters of early successional soils from a receding glacier in the Tianshan Mountains. The total number of culturable bacteria ranged from 2.19 × 105 to 1.30 × 106 CFU g-1 dw and from 9.33 × 105 to 2.53 × 106 CFU g-1 dw at 4 °C and 25 °C, respectively. The number of culturable bacteria in the soil increased at 25 °C but decreased at 4 °C along the chronosequence. The total organic carbon, total nitrogen content, and enzymatic activity were relatively low in the glacier foreland. The number of culturable bacteria isolated at 25 °C was significantly positively correlated with the TOC and TN as well as the soil urease, protease, polyphenoloxidase, sucrase, catalase, and dehydrogenase activities. We obtained 358 isolates from the glacier foreland soils that clustered into 35 groups using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. These groups are affiliated with 20 genera that belong to six taxa, namely, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroides, and Deinococcus-Thermus, with a predominance of members of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria in all of the samples. A redundancy analysis showed that the bacterial succession was divided into three periods, an early stage (10a), a middle stage (25-74a), and a late stage (100-130a), with the total number of culturable bacteria mainly being affected by the soil enzymatic activity, suggesting that the microbial succession correlated with the soil age along the foreland.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Ice Cover/microbiology , Ice Cover/chemistry , Phylogeny , Soil/chemistry , Soil Microbiology , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/growth & development , Bacteria/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , China , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Nitrogen/analysis , Nitrogen/metabolism
9.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(3): 489-502, July-Sept. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951803

ABSTRACT

Abstract Human activities on the Earth's surface change the landscape of natural ecosystems. Mining practices are one of the most severe human activities, drastically altering the chemical, physical and biological properties of the soil environment. Bacterial communities in soil play an important role in the maintenance of ecological relationships. This work shows bacterial diversity, metabolic repertoire and physiological behavior in five ecosystems samples with different levels of impact. These ecosystems belong to a historical area in Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil, which suffered mining activities until its total depletion without recovery since today. The results revealed Proteobacteria as the most predominant phylum followed by Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes. Soils that have not undergone anthropological actions exhibit an increase ability to degrade carbon sources. The richest soil with the high diversity was found in ecosystems that have suffered anthropogenic action. Our study shows profile of diversity inferring metabolic profile, which may elucidate the mechanisms underlying changes in community structure in situ mining sites in Brazil. Our data comes from contributing to know the bacterial diversity, relationship between these bacteria and can explore strategies for natural bioremediation in mining areas or adjacent areas under regeneration process in iron mining areas.


Subject(s)
Soil Microbiology , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Biodiversity , Phylogeny , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/metabolism , Brazil , Ecosystem , Mining
10.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(3): 463-470, July-Sept. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951805

ABSTRACT

Abstract Employing Illumina Hiseq whole genome metagenome sequencing approach, we studied the impact of Trichoderma harzianum on altering the microbial community and its functional dynamics in the rhizhosphere soil of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). The metagenomic datasets from the rhizosphere with (treatment) and without (control) T. harzianum inoculation were annotated using dual approach, i.e., stand alone and MG-RAST. The probiotic application of T. harzianum in the rhizhosphere soil of black pepper impacted the population dynamics of rhizosphere bacteria, archae, eukaryote as reflected through the selective recruitment of bacteria [Acidobacteriaceae bacterium (p = 1.24e-12), Candidatus koribacter versatilis (p = 2.66e-10)] and fungi [(Fusarium oxysporum (p = 0.013), Talaromyces stipitatus (p = 0.219) and Pestalotiopsis fici (p = 0.443)] in terms of abundance in population and bacterial chemotaxis (p = 0.012), iron metabolism (p = 2.97e-5) with the reduction in abundance for pathogenicity islands (p = 7.30e-3), phages and prophages (p = 7.30e-3) with regard to functional abundance. Interestingly, it was found that the enriched functional metagenomic signatures on phytoremediation such as benzoate transport and degradation (p = 2.34e-4), and degradation of heterocyclic aromatic compounds (p = 3.59e-13) in the treatment influenced the rhizosphere micro ecosystem favoring growth and health of pepper plant. The population dynamics and functional richness of rhizosphere ecosystem in black pepper influenced by the treatment with T. harzianum provides the ecological importance of T. harzianum in the cultivation of black pepper.


Subject(s)
Soil Microbiology , Bacteria/growth & development , Trichoderma/growth & development , Viruses/growth & development , Piper nigrum/microbiology , Biodiversity , Fungi/growth & development , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Trichoderma/isolation & purification , Trichoderma/genetics , Viruses/isolation & purification , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Ecosystem , Piper nigrum/growth & development , Rhizosphere , Fungi/isolation & purification , Fungi/classification , Fungi/genetics
11.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(3): 481-488, July-Sept. 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951816

ABSTRACT

Abstract An increasing production of natural rubber (NR) products has led to major challenges in waste management. In this study, the degradation of rubber latex gloves in a mineral salt medium (MSM) using a bacterial consortium, a mixed culture of the selected bacteria and a pure culture were studied. The highest 18% weight loss of the rubber gloves were detected after incubated with the mixed culture. The increased viable cell counts over incubation time indicated that cells used rubber gloves as sole carbon source leading to the degradation of the polymer. The growth behavior of NR-degrading bacteria on the latex gloves surface was investigated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The occurrence of the aldehyde groups in the degradation products was observed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis. Rhodococcus pyridinivorans strain F5 gave the highest weight loss of rubber gloves among the isolated strain and posses latex clearing protein encoded by lcp gene. The mixed culture of the selected strains showed the potential in degrading rubber within 30 days and is considered to be used efficiently for rubber product degradation. This is the first report to demonstrate a strong ability to degrade rubber by Rhodococcus pyridinivorans.


Subject(s)
Rubber/metabolism , Soil Microbiology , Rhodococcus/isolation & purification , Rhodococcus/metabolism , Latex/metabolism , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/metabolism , Biodegradation, Environmental , Rhodococcus/classification , Rhodococcus/genetics , Gloves, Protective/microbiology
12.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(3): 534-543, July-Sept. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951818

ABSTRACT

Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) remains a severe and potentially fatal disease demanding sophisticated diagnostic strategies for detection of the causative microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to develop a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction in the routine diagnostic of IE for the early diagnosis of fatal disease. A broad-range PCR technique was selected and evaluated in terms of its efficiency in the diagnosis of endocarditis using 19 heart valves from patients undergoing cardiovascular surgeries at the Habib Bourguiba Hospital of Sfax, Tunisia, on the grounds of suspected IE. The results demonstrated the efficiency of this technique particularly in cases involving a limited number of bacteria since it helped to increase detection sensitivity. The technique proved to be efficient, particularly, in the bacteriological diagnosis of IE in contexts involving negative results from conventional culture methods and other contexts involving bacterial species that were not amenable to identification by phenotypic investigations. Indeed, the sequencing of the partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed the presence of Bartonella henselae, Enterobacter sp., and Streptococcus pyogenes in three heart valves with the negative culture. It should be noted that the results obtained from the polymerase chain reaction-sequencing identification applied to the heart valve and the strain isolated from the same tissue were not consistent with the ones found by the conventional microbiological methods in the case of IE caused by Gemella morbillorum. In fact, the results from the molecular identification revealed the presence of Lactobacillus jensenii. Overall, the results have revealed that the proposed method is sensitive, reliable and might open promising opportunities for the early diagnosis of IE.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Endocarditis/microbiology , Endocarditis, Bacterial/microbiology , Phylogeny , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Heart Valves/microbiology , Middle Aged
13.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(2): 269-278, Apr.-June 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889232

ABSTRACT

Abstract A total of 276 endophytic bacteria were isolated from the root nodules of soybean (Glycine max L.) grown in 14 sites in Henan Province, China. The inhibitory activity of these bacteria against pathogenic fungus Phytophthora sojae 01 was screened in vitro. Six strains with more than 63% inhibitory activities were further characterized through optical epifluorescence microscopic observation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene, potential plant growth-promoting properties analysis, and plant inoculation assay. On the basis of the phylogeny of 16S rRNA genes, the six endophytic antagonists were identified as belonging to five genera: Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum, and Bacillus. The strain Acinetobacter calcoaceticus DD161 had the strongest inhibitory activity (71.14%) against the P. sojae 01, which caused morphological abnormal changes of fungal mycelia; such changes include fracture, lysis, formation of a protoplast ball at the end of hyphae, and split ends. Except for Ochrobactrum haematophilum DD234, other antagonistic strains showed the capacity to produce siderophore, indole acetic acid, and nitrogen fixation activity. Regression analysis suggested a significant positive correlation between siderophore production and inhibition ratio against P. sojae 01. This study demonstrated that nodule endophytic bacteria are important resources for searching for inhibitors specific to the fungi and for promoting effects for soybean seedlings.


Subject(s)
Plant Growth Regulators/metabolism , Soybeans/growth & development , Soybeans/microbiology , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Root Nodules, Plant/microbiology , Endophytes/isolation & purification , Antibiosis , Phylogeny , Phytophthora/cytology , Phytophthora/growth & development , Phytophthora/drug effects , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/metabolism , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Cluster Analysis , China , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Endophytes/classification , Endophytes/metabolism
14.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(2): 248-257, Apr.-June 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889237

ABSTRACT

Abstract In this study for the first-time microbial communities in the caves located in the mountain range of Hindu Kush were evaluated. The samples were analyzed using culture-independent (16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing) and culture-dependent methods. The amplicon sequencing results revealed a broad taxonomic diversity, including 21 phyla and 20 candidate phyla. Proteobacteria were dominant in both caves, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, and the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. Representative operational taxonomic units from Koat Maqbari Ghaar and Smasse-Rawo Ghaar were grouped into 235 and 445 different genera, respectively. Comparative analysis of the cultured bacterial isolates revealed distinct bacterial taxonomic profiles in the studied caves dominated by Proteobacteria in Koat Maqbari Ghaar and Firmicutes in Smasse-Rawo Ghaar. Majority of those isolates were associated with the genera Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Thirty strains among the identified isolates from both caves showed antimicrobial activity. Overall, the present study gave insight into the great bacterial taxonomic diversity and antimicrobial potential of the isolates from the previously uncharacterized caves located in the world's highest mountains range in the Indian sub-continent.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Environmental Microbiology , Biota , Antibiosis , Pakistan , Phylogeny , Bacteria/growth & development , Bacteria/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Cluster Analysis , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Euryarchaeota/isolation & purification , Euryarchaeota/classification , Euryarchaeota/growth & development , Euryarchaeota/genetics , DNA, Archaeal/genetics , DNA, Archaeal/chemistry , Metagenomics
15.
Rev. chil. infectol ; 35(2): 155-162, abr. 2018. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-959425

ABSTRACT

Resumen Introducción: Las úlceras crónicas son un problema de salud pública, agravándose por infecciones bacterianas causadas principalmente por agentes resistentes. Objetivo: Estudiar prevalencia y perfil de susceptibilidad en bacterias aisladas de úlceras crónicas en pacientes adultos. Pacientes y Métodos: Pacientes atendidos en la Fundación Instituto Nacional de Heridas entre mayo y julio de 2014, con úlceras crónicas en extremidades inferiores con signos inflamatorios clínicos. Las muestras fueron cultivadas en aerobiosis y anaerobiosis y para la identificación bacteriana se empleó el sistema de galerías API (Biomerieux). La susceptibilidad in vitro se evaluó según el método de Kirby Bauer. Resultados: Se reclutaron 73 pacientes, entre quienes 46 presentaron úlceras infectadas, diagnosticándose 33 úlceras venosas con predominio de infección polimicrobiana y 10 úlceras de pie diabético con predominio de infección monomicrobiana (p ≤ 0,05). Se aislaron 68 cepas de los 46 pacientes con úlcera infectada. Las enterobacterias predominaron en infección monomicrobiana (p ≤ 0,05) y los demás grupos bacterianos fueron levemente más frecuentes en infección polimicrobiana. La especie prevalente fue Staphylococcus aureus (24%) seguida de Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%). Cincuenta cepas (77%) presentaron resistencia a uno o más antibacterianos. Destacamos resistencia de S. aureus a ciprofloxacina (50%) y cefoxitina (37,5%) identificándose así resistencia a meticilina en la comunidad (SARM-AC), siendo todas sensibles a cotrimoxazol. Las enterobacterias presentaron resistencia a sensibilidad a amikacina (95,5%), P. aeruginosa evidenció resistencia a ciprofloxacina (33,3%) con alta sensibilidad a gentamicina (91,7%) y amikacina (83,3%), mientras Acinetobacter spp presentó resistencia a ciprofloxacina y ceftazidima en 60%, con 100% de sensibilidad a imipenem. Streptococcus β hemolítico presentó 50% de resistencia a clindamicina y penicilina. Conclusión: Estos datos entregan información epidemiológica de infecciones de úlceras crónicas, representando un apoyo al diagnóstico, tratamiento y manejo de esta patología.


Background: Chronic wounds are considered a public health problem that may be complicated by bacterial infections, mainly caused by resistant strains. Aim: To study the bacteria prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility in samples from adult patients with chronic wounds. Methods: Patients treated at National Institute of Wounds Foundation between May and July 2014, with chronic ulcers in lower extremities with clinical inflammatory signs were recluted. Samples were cultured in aerobic and anaerobic atmosphere and species identification was performed by API (Biomerieux) galleries. The in vitro susceptibility was evaluated according to the Kirby Bauer method. Results: From 73 patients, 46 had infected wounds most of them were venous ulcers (33) with prevalence in polymicrobial infections and 10 with foot-diabetes ulcers with prevalence in monomicrobial infections (p ≤ 0.05). Sixty-eight strains were isolated and Enterobacteriaceae were predominant in monomicrobial infection (p ≤ 0.05) and the other groups were slightly higher in polymicrobial infection. The main species were Staphylococcus aureus (24%) followed by P. aeruginosa (18%). Fifty strains (77%) were resistant or multi-resistance. We emphasize resistance of S. aureus to ciprofloxacin (50%) and cefoxitin (37.5%), thus identifying resistance to methicillin in the community (CA-SAMR), all of which are sensitive to cotrimoxazole. Enterobacteria showed sensitivity to amikacin (95.5%), P. aeruginosa showed resistance to ciprofloxacin (33.3%) with high sensitivity to gentamicin (91.7%) and amikacin (83.3%), while Acinetobacter spp showed resistance to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime in 60%, with 100% sensitivity to imipenem. 50% Streptococcus β hemolytic showed resistance to clindamycin and penicillin. Conclusion: These data provide epidemiological information on chronic wound infections, representing support for diagnosis, treatment and management of this pathology.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Wound Infection/microbiology , Wound Infection/drug therapy , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Gram-Negative Bacteria/isolation & purification , Gram-Positive Bacteria/isolation & purification , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Wound Infection/epidemiology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Chile/epidemiology , Chronic Disease , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Gram-Negative Bacteria/classification , Gram-Positive Bacteria/classification
16.
Univ. sci ; 23(1): 35-59, Jan.-Apr. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, COLNAL | ID: biblio-963358

ABSTRACT

Abstract Oxalate is a highly oxidized organic acid anion used as a carbon and energy source by oxalotrophic bacteria. Oxalogenic plants convert atmospheric CO2 into oxalic acid and oxalic salts. Oxalate-salt formation acts as a carbon sink in terrestrial ecosystems via the oxalate-carbonate pathway (OCP). Oxalotrophic bacteria might be implicated in other carbon-storage processes, including the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). More recently, a variety of bacteria from the Andean region of Colombia in Narino have been reported for their PHA-producing abilities. These species can degrade oxalate and participate in the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize oxalotrophic bacteria with the capacity to accumulate PHA biopolymers. Plants of the genus Oxalis were collected and bacteria were isolated from the soil adhering to the roots. The isolated bacterial strains were characterized using biochemical and molecular biological methods. The consumption of oxalate in culture was quantified, and PHA production was monitored in batch fermentation. The polymeric composition was characterized using gas chromatography. Finally, a biosynthetic pathway based on our findings and on those from published sources is proposed. Strains of Bacillus spp. and Serratia sp. were found to metabolize calcium oxalate and synthesize PHA.


Resumen El oxalato es un anión de ácido orgánico altamente oxidado usado como fuente carbono y energía por bacterias oxalotróficas. Las plantas oxalogénicas convierten CO2 atmosférico en ácido oxálico y sales oxálicas. La formación de sales de oxalato actúa como un sumidero de carbono en ecosistemas terrestres via oxalato-carbonato (OCP). Las bacterias oxalotróficas podrían estar implicadas en otros procesos de almacenamiento de carbono, incluyendo la síntesis de polihidroxialcanoatos (PHAs). Recientemente, una variedad de bacterias de la región andina colombiana en Nariño ha sido reportada por su habilidad para producir PHAs. Estas especies pueden degradar oxalato y participar en la vía del oxalato-carbonato. El objetivo de este estudio fue aislar y caracterizar bacterias oxalotróficas con capacidad de acumular biopolímeros PHA. Se colectaron plantas del genero Oxalis y se aislaron bacterias del suelo adheridas a las raíces. Las cepas bacterianas aisladas se caracterizaron usando métodos bioquímicos y de biología molecular. Se cuantificó el consumo de oxalato en cultivo, y se monitoreó la producción de PHA en fermentación por lotes. La composición polimérica se caracterizó usando cromatografía de gases. Finalmente, se propone una via biosintética basada en nuestros hallazgos y en los de otras fuentes publicadas. Se encontró que las cepas de Bacillus spp. y Serratia sp. metabolizan oxalato de calcio y sintetizan PHA.


Resumo O oxalato é um ânion de ácido orgânico altamente oxidado utilizado como fonte de carbono e nergía por bactérias oxalotróficas. As plantas oxalogênicas convertem CO2 atmosférico em ácido oxálico e sais oxálicos. A formação de sais de oxalato atua como um sumidouro de carbono em ecossistemas terrestres via oxalato-carbono (OCP). As bactérias oxalotróficas poderiam estar envolvidas em outros processos de armazenamento de carbono, incluindo a sínteses de polihidroxialcanoatos (PHAs). Recentemente, uma variedade de bactérias da região Andina colombiana no Departamento de Nariño foi reportada devido a sua habilidade para produzir PHAs. Estas espécies podem degradar oxalato e participar na via oxalato-carbono. O objetivo de esse estudo foi isolar e caracterizar bactérias oxalotróficas com capacidade de acumular biopolímeros PHA. Plantas do género Oxalis foram coletadas e se isolaram bactérias do solo aderido a suas raízes. As cepas bacterianas isoladas se caracterizaram utilizando métodos bioquímicos e de biologia molecular. O consumo de oxalato em cultivo foi quantificado, e a produção de PHA foi monitorada em fermentação por lotes. A composição polimérica se caracterizou utilizando Cromatografia de Gases. Finalmente, se propõe uma via biossintética baseada em nossos resultados juntamente com resultados da literatura. Se encontrou que as cepas de Bacillus spp. e Serratia sp. metabolizam oxalato de cálcio e sintetizam PHA.


Subject(s)
Oxalates , Bacteria/classification , Chromatography, Gas
17.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(1): 59-66, Jan.-Mar. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889203

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Mangroves are ecosystems located in the transition zone between land and sea that serve as a potential source of biotechnological resources. Brazil's extensive coast contains one of the largest mangrove forests in the world (encompassing an area of 25,000 km2 along all the coast). Endophytic bacteria were isolated from the following three plant species: Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia nitida. A large number of these isolates, 115 in total, were evaluated for their ability to fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphorous. Bacteria that tested positive for both of these tests were examined further to determine their level of indole acetic acid production. Two strains with high indole acetic acid production were selected for use as inoculants for reforestation trees, and then the growth of the plants was evaluated under field conditions. The bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain MCR1.10) had a low phosphorus solubilization index, while this index was higher in the other strain used, Enterobacter sp. (strain MCR1.48). We used the reforestation tree Acacia polyphylla. The results indicate that inoculation with the MCR1.48 endophyte increases Acacia polyphylla shoot dry mass, demonstrating that this strain effectively promotes the plant's growth and fitness, which can be used in the seedling production of this tree. Therefore, we successfully screened the biotechnological potential of endophyte isolates from mangrove, with a focus on plant growth promotion, and selected a strain able to provide limited nutrients and hormones for in plant growth.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Trees/microbiology , Acacia/microbiology , Endophytes/isolation & purification , Phylogeny , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/metabolism , Trees/growth & development , Brazil , Acacia/growth & development , Wetlands , Endophytes/classification , Endophytes/genetics , Endophytes/metabolism , Indoleacetic Acids/metabolism
18.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(1): 87-96, Jan.-Mar. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889214

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Variations in microbial communities promoted by alterations in environmental conditions are reflected in similarities/differences both at taxonomic and functional levels. Here we used a natural gradient within mangroves from seashore to upland, to contrast the natural variability in bacteria, cyanobacteria and diazotroph assemblages in a pristine area compared to an oil polluted area along a timespan of three years, based on ARISA (bacteria and cyanobacteria) and nifH T-RFLP (diazotrophs) fingerprinting. The data presented herein indicated that changes in all the communities evaluated were mainly driven by the temporal effect in the contaminated area, while local effects were dominant on the pristine mangrove. A positive correlation of community structure between diazotrophs and cyanobacteria was observed, suggesting the functional importance of this phylum as nitrogen fixers in mangroves soils. Different ecological patterns explained the microbial behavior in the pristine and polluted mangroves. Stochastic models in the pristine mangrove indicate that there is not a specific environmental factor that determines the bacterial distribution, while cyanobacteria and diazotrophs better fitted in deterministic model in the same area. For the contaminated mangrove site, deterministic models better represented the variations in the communities, suggesting that the presence of oil might change the microbial ecological structures over time. Mangroves represent a unique environment threatened by global change, and this study contributed to the knowledge of the microbial distribution in such areas and its response on persistent contamination historic events.


Subject(s)
Soil/chemistry , Soil Microbiology , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Phylogeny , Soil Pollutants/analysis , Soil Pollutants/metabolism , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/metabolism , Petroleum/analysis , Petroleum/metabolism , Biodiversity , Wetlands , Nitrogen/metabolism
19.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(1): 20-28, Jan.-Mar. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889213

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT This work aimed to characterize 20 isolates obtained from upland rice plants, based on phenotypic (morphology, enzymatic activity, inorganic phosphate solubilization, carbon source use, antagonism), genotypic assays (16S rRNA sequencing) and plant growth promotion. Results showed a great morphological, metabolic and genetic variability among bacterial isolates. All isolates showed positive activity for catalase and protease enzymes and, 90% of the isolates showed positive activity for amylase, catalase and, nitrogenase. All isolates were able to metabolize sucrose and malic acid in contrast with mannitol, which was metabolized only by one isolate. For the other carbon sources, we observed a great variability in its use by the isolates. Most isolates showed antibiosis against Rhizoctonia solani (75%) and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (55%) and, 50% of them showed antibiosis against both pathogens. Six isolates showed simultaneous ability of antibiosis, inorganic phosphate solubilization and protease activity. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene all the isolates belong to Bacillus genus. Under greenhouse conditions, two isolates (S4 and S22) improved to about 24%, 25%, 30% and 31% the Total N, leaf area, shoot dry weight and root dry weight, respectively, of rice plants, indicating that they should be tested for this ability under field conditions.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Chryseobacterium/genetics , Oryza/growth & development , Soil Microbiology , Antibiosis , Bacterial Physiological Phenomena , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Base Composition , Base Sequence , Chryseobacterium/classification , Chryseobacterium/drug effects , Chryseobacterium/isolation & purification , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Molecular Sequence Data , Oryza/microbiology , Phylogeny
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