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1.
Rev. chil. cir ; 70(2): 104-111, 2018. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-959357

ABSTRACT

Resumen Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el papel de los mastocitos en la respuesta inflamatoria posoperatoria tras el implante de mallas protésicas para la reparación de defectos de la pared abdominal en biomodelos rata Wistar. Materiales y Métodos: Se fabricó una malla de fibroma entretejiendo sus hilos. Se utilizaron 25 ratas Wistar macho adultas, a las cuales se les creó un defecto quirúrgico de 30 × 20 mm en la pared abdominal anterior. Este defecto anatómico fue posteriormente reparado con uno de los dos tipos de mallas previamente esterilizadas, las cuales fueron la malla de fibroína, y la malla comercial ultrapo monocryl prolene composite (Johnson & Johnson-Ethicon). A los 28 días después del procedimiento quirúrgico se sacrificaron los biomodelos y se extrajeron las muestras que posteriormente fueron tratadas con técnicas histoquímicas para su análisis histológico. Resultados: El estudio reportó adherencia a omento en los dos tipos de malla utilizadas, sin embargo, la malla comercial mostró adherencias de amplio espesor a colon, intestino delgado e hígado, incluyendo también al omento menor. Se encontró que la malla comercial presentaba mayor cantidad de mastocitos en las regiones estudiadas (dermis, perimisio, y la serosa visceral). Discusión: Estudios refieren que los mastocitos y sus productos como la histamina, la serotonina, entre otras juegan un papel clave en el control de la inflamación local, la cicatrización de heridas, adherencias y las reacciones a cuerpos extraños in vivo. Conclusión: Con base en la literatura consultada se puede concluir que el presente estudio es vanguardista en lo que respecta al posible papel que juegan los mastocitos en el proceso de reparación de defectos anatómicos de la pared abdominal.


Objective: The objective of this study was to evalúate the role of mast cells in the postoperative inflammatory response after implantation of prosthetic mesh to repair abdominal wall defects in Wistar rat. Materials and Methods: An abdominal wall defect (30 × 20 mm) was created in the anterior abdominal wall of 25 adult male Wistar rats. The anatomical defect was then repaired with one of the two type's meshes. Fibroin and monocryl ultrapo prolene meshes. Fibroin meshes were manufactured by weaving its threads, the polypropylene mesh was bought to Johnson & Johnson-Ethicon. After 28 days of implantation Wistar rats were sacrificed and the mesh with abdominal tissue was extracted. Subsequently the samples were treated with histochemical techniques for histological analysis. Results: The study reported adherence to omentum in both types of meshes used, however, the polypropylene mesh showed widely adhesions to colon, slight to intestine and liver, also in a very lower amount, adhesions to omentum. It was found that mast cells were presented in all the studied regions for the polypropylene mesh (dermis, perimysium, and visceral serosa). Discussion: Studies indicate that mast cells and their products such as histamine, seroto- nin, and others play a key role in controlling local inflammation, wound healing, adhesions, and reactions to foreign bodies in vivo. Conclusion: We can conclude that this study is a good step to show the possible role of mast cells in the abdominal wall repair process.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Surgical Mesh , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Mast Cells/metabolism , Histamine/metabolism , Serotonin/metabolism , Rats, Wistar , Models, Animal , Inflammation
2.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 47(2): 452-460, Apr.-June 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-780816

ABSTRACT

Abstract A high concentration of histamine, one of the biogenic amines (BAs) usually found in fermented foods, can cause undesirable physiological side effects in sensitive humans. The objective of this study is to isolate indigenous Acetobacter strains from naturally fermented Bokbunja vinegar in Korea with reduced histamine production during starter fermentation. Further, we examined its physiological and biochemical properties, including BA synthesis. The obtained strain MBA-77, identified as Acetobacter aceti by 16S rDNA homology and biochemical analysis and named A. aceti MBA-77. A. aceti MBA-77 showed optimal acidity % production at pH 5; the optimal temperature was 25 °C. When we prepared and examined the BAs synthesis spectrum during the fermentation process, Bokbunja wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the histamine concentration increased from 2.72 of Bokbunja extract to 5.29 mg/L and cadaverine and dopamine was decreased to 2.6 and 10.12 mg/L, respectively. Bokbunja vinegar prepared by A. aceti MBA-77 as the starter, the histamine concentration of the vinegar preparation step was decreased up to 3.66 mg/L from 5.29 mg/L in the wine preparation step. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate acetic acid bacteria isolated from Bokbunja seed vinegar with low spectrum BA and would be useful for wellbeing vinegar preparation.


Subject(s)
Wine/analysis , Biogenic Amines/analysis , Acetobacter/metabolism , Histamine/metabolism , Rubus/microbiology , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Wine/microbiology , Acetobacter/isolation & purification , Acetobacter/genetics , Histamine/analysis , Acetic Acid/analysis , Acetic Acid/metabolism , Fermentation , Rubus/metabolism , Food Microbiology
3.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 797-807, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72902

ABSTRACT

Mast cells have been regarded for a long time as effector cells in IgE mediated type I reactions and in host defence against parasites. However, they are resident in all environmental exposed tissues and express a wide variety of receptors, suggesting that these cells can also function as sentinels in innate immune responses. Indeed, studies have demonstrated an important role of mast cells during the induction of life-saving antibacterial responses. Furthermore, recent findings have shown that mast cells promote and modulate the development of adaptive immune responses, making them an important hinge of innate and acquired immunity. In addition, mast cells and several mast cell-produced mediators have been shown to be important during the development of allergic airway diseases. In the present review, we will summarize findings on the role of mast cells during the development of adaptive immune responses and highlight their function, especially during the development of allergic asthma.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Asthma/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Histamine/metabolism , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Immune System , Immunoglobulin E/immunology , Leukotrienes/metabolism , Mast Cells/cytology , Models, Biological , Prostaglandins/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
4.
J Environ Biol ; 2007 Apr; 28(2): 271-4
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-113140

ABSTRACT

Present study deals with the hampering of the growth of histamine producing bacteria (HPB), by using NaCl and spices which are easily available and cheaper cost wise. For this experiment, four strains of HPB viz. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis were tested against 1 to 10% concentrations of NaCl and 1 to 5% concentrations of natural preservatives (turmeric, ginger and garlic) in a basal medium. HPB showed different growth rates at different concentrations of NaCl and natural preservatives. V. parahaemolyticus, B. cereus and Ps. aeruginosa showed no growth at 10% concentration. When the HPB growth was tested with garlic, turmeric and ginger extracts, growth of all the bacteria was inhibited by garlic and turmeric extracts at 5% concentration. In ginger, V. parahaemolyticus, B. cereus and P. mirabilis were totally inhibited at 5% concentration. But Ps. aeruginosa showed very less growth at this concentration.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bacteria/drug effects , Cold Temperature , Curcuma , Fishes/microbiology , Food Microbiology , Food Preservation/methods , Garlic/chemistry , Ginger/chemistry , Histamine/metabolism , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Seafood/microbiology , Sodium Chloride/pharmacology
5.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2006 Aug; 44(8): 627-34
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-55692

ABSTRACT

Posterior cerebellar lesion induced severe focal inflammatory ulcers at the stomach associated with extensive damage of the surface epithelial cells, leading to focal necrotic ulcers. The ulcer index increased maximally and progressively between day 7 and day 14 after lesion. The total mucosal mast cell and degranulated mucosal mast cell increased maximally on day 7 and progressively declined from day 14 to day 21. Gastric histamine content was also significantly increased on day 7 and 14. A significant reduction in mucous content (total CHO:P) was observed within 7-28 days after lesion. The results suggest that the gastric mucosal mast cells play an important role in ulcerogenesis induced by cerebellar lesion.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Count , Cerebellum/pathology , Female , Gastric Juice/metabolism , Gastric Mucosa/cytology , Histamine/metabolism , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Male , Mast Cells/cytology , Mucus/metabolism , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Stomach Ulcer/metabolism
6.
Journal of Forensic Medicine ; (6): 445-447, 2006.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-983245

ABSTRACT

The death caused of anaphylactic shock is common in clinical medicine and medicolegal expertise, but it is a nodus to diagnose sudden death from allergy. In recent years, to provide objective and precise morphological evidence and index of diagnosis for sudden death from allergy, scholars of internal and overseas studied the content of IgE, HT, mast cell tryptase and SP in the serum of the death died of anaphylactic shock, and their immune express in lung and stomach intestine. In this text we reviewed the present study and existing problems of the forensic medicine diagnosis of the sudden erethistic death.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anaphylaxis/pathology , Death, Sudden , Forensic Pathology , Gastric Mucosa/metabolism , Histamine/metabolism , Immunoglobulin E/metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Mast Cells/enzymology , Retrospective Studies , Substance P/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism
7.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2005 Jun; 43(6): 517-21
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-58311

ABSTRACT

The present study was designed to investigate anti-ulcerogenic property of ethanolic extract of Desmodium gangeticum (DG) against cold restraint (CRU, 2 hr cold restraint stress), aspirin (ASP, 150 mg/kg orally), alcohol (AL, absolute alcohol 1 ml/200gm) and pyloric ligation (PL, 4 hr pylorus ligation) induced gastric ulcer models in Sprague Dawley rats, and histamine (HST, 0.25 mg/kg) induced duodenal ulcer in guinea pigs. We found that DG at a dose of 200mg/kg, (orally), markedly decreased the incidence of ulcers in all the above models. DG showed significant protection against CRU (68.37%), AL (88.87%), ASP (38.2%), PL (40.63%) and HST (63.15%) induced ulcer models, whereas standard drug omeprazole (OMZ) showed protection index of 83.86, 56.35, 70.31 and 84.21%, respectively in CRU, ASP, PL and HST models. Sucralfate as standard drug showed 92.64% protection in AL model. DG significantly reduced acid secretion 41.61%, whereas OMZ produced 43.13% reduction. Treatment with DG showed increase in mucin secretion by 56.17%, whereas OMZ showed 12.45% increase. Anti-ulcer effect of DG may be due to its cytoprotective effect along with antisecretory activity and could act as a potent therapeutic agent against peptic ulcer disease.


Subject(s)
Alcohols/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Ulcer Agents/pharmacology , Aspirin/pharmacology , Cold Temperature , Duodenal Ulcer/drug therapy , Ethanol/chemistry , Fabaceae/metabolism , Female , Guinea Pigs , Histamine/metabolism , Male , Omeprazole/chemistry , Peptic Ulcer/metabolism , Pilot Projects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Stomach Ulcer/drug therapy , Sucralfate/chemistry
8.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 367-372, 2005.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201263

ABSTRACT

The pathogenic mechanism of ASA-induced urticaria/angioedema (AIU) is still poorly understood, but it has been known that histamine releasing by cutaneous mast cell activation is considered to be an important role. Considering the importance of histamine in AIU, we speculated that a genetic abnormality of histamine-related genes such as a high-affinity IgE receptor, a metabolic enzyme of histamines and histamine receptors, may be involved in the development of AIU. Enrolled in the study were 110 patients with AIU, 53 patients without ASA hypersensitivity who had various drug allergies presenting as exanthematous skin symptoms, and 99 normal healthy controls (NC). Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the beta chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FCER1B) and three histamine-related genes-histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT), histamine H1 receptor (HRH1), histamine H2 receptor (HRH2)-were screened using the SNP-IT assay based on a single base extension method. No significant differences were observed in allele and genotype frequencies, and haplotype frequencies of all the SNPs of FCER1B, HNMT, HRH1, and HRH2 among the three groups (p>0.05, respectively). These results suggest that the polymorphisms of FCER1B and the three histamine-related genes may not contribute to the development of AIU phenotype in the Korean population.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Alleles , Angioedema/chemically induced , Aspirin , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Haplotypes , Histamine/metabolism , Histamine Release/genetics , Linkage Disequilibrium , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Receptors, IgE/genetics , Urticaria/chemically induced
9.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-37218

ABSTRACT

Allergen skin prick tests (SPT) are very sensitive and specific tests to detect allergic sensitization in atopic patients. Certain factors like antihistamines, antidepressant therapies or circadian rhythms can alter the results of SPT. In women, the changes in endogenous hormone levels throughout the menstrual cycle may affect the allergic responses and natural course of allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the probable influence of the phases of the menstrual cycle on SPT reactivity to allergen extracts and histamine. Forty-two female patients with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were enrolled in the study. Skin prick test reactivities to allergens and histamine were measured at the beginning of the menstrual cycle (3rd or 4th day), mid-cycle (14th or 15th day) and end-cycle (27th or 28th day) consecutively. Serum estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were determined simultaneously. We observed the most significant reactions to allergens when SPT is performed at mid-cycle. However, SPT reactivity to histamine did not vary throughout the menstrual cycle. Serum estradiol and LH levels showed positive correlation with SPT reactivity to allergens at mid-cycle. Our results suggest that SPT give the best results when they are performed at mid-cycle. Additionally, allergens seem to cause mast cell degranulation to a greater extent in subjects in which endogenous hormones like estradiol and LH are elevated.


Subject(s)
Adult , Allergens/metabolism , Conjunctivitis, Allergic/blood , Estradiol/blood , Female , Follicle Stimulating Hormone/blood , Histamine/metabolism , Humans , Hypersensitivity/metabolism , Luteinizing Hormone/blood , Menstrual Cycle/metabolism , Progesterone/blood , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/blood , Skin Tests , Time Factors
10.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-16242

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: The biochemical mechanisms underlying the development of sensitization-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma are poorly defined. Alterations in the regulation of intracellular calcium may play an important role in its pathogenesis. We carried out this study to see the effect of sensitization with ovalbumin on membrane ion fluxes and intracellular calcium in a guinea pig model. METHODS: Airway reactivity to inhaled histamine was measured initially and after sensitization with ovalbumin in 28 guineapigs. Intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i was measured in tracheal smooth muscle cells and peripheral leukocytes using fluorescent dye FURA 2AM. Calcium and sodium ion influx across the cell membrane was measured in leukocytes. Ouabain-sensitive Rubidium ((86)Rb) influx was measured in tracheal smooth muscles cells. The activities of Na(+), K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase were measured in tracheal smooth muscle cells. Lipid peroxides were measured in plasma. RESULTS: Airway responsiveness was significantly (P<0.001) increased after sensitization along with an increase in [Ca2+]i levels in leukocytes and tracheal smooth muscle cells, higher rates of (45)Ca and (22)Na influx in leukocytes and higher (86)Rb influx rates in tracheal smooth muscle cells, and increased levels of lipid peroxides in plasma. INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: In guineapig model of asthma sensitization to allergen increased the membrane permeability to calcium and sodium, and intracellular calcium levels. These alterations may play a role in the pathogenesis of airway hyper-responsiveness following sensitization.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bronchial Hyperreactivity/metabolism , Calcium/chemistry , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism , Fura-2/analogs & derivatives , Guinea Pigs , Histamine/metabolism , Ions/metabolism , Leukocytes/cytology , Lipid Peroxidation , Male , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/cytology , Ovalbumin/metabolism , Rubidium Radioisotopes/metabolism , Sodium Radioisotopes/metabolism , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Trachea/cytology
11.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2004 May; 42(5): 481-5
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-63299

ABSTRACT

Histamine reduced sperm viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by rise in intrasperm Ca2+. Further, 2',4'-dichlorobenzamil hydrochloride (DBZ), a Na+-Ca2+ exchange inhibitor, known to elevate intrasperm Ca2+, potentiated both, elevation of intrasperm Ca2+ and spermicidal action of histamine. Pretreatment of sperm with very low doses of H1-receptor antagonists (chlorpheniramine, promethazine or diphenhydramine) prevented the histamine-induced elevation of intrasperm Ca2+ as well as its spermicidal action. However, pretreatment with famotidine, a H2-receptor antagonist did not produce such a protective action. The results strongly suggest that histamine elicits its spermicidal action via H1-receptors present on sperm cells.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Cell Survival , Chlorpheniramine/pharmacology , Diphenhydramine/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Ejaculation , Histamine/metabolism , Histamine Antagonists/pharmacology , Histamine H1 Antagonists/pharmacology , Humans , Male , Promethazine/pharmacology , Sperm Motility/drug effects , Spermatozoa/drug effects , Time Factors
12.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 276-282, 2001.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-62736

ABSTRACT

Determining positive food challenges are not easy as there is an absence of simple and objective tests. Histamine, an essential mediator for allergic reactions, is involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) and food challenges can change histamine levels. The significances of a prick test with histamine (histamine prick test, HPT) relating to the interpretation of food challenges in AD were evaluated. A total of 467 AD patients participated in this study. Skin prick tests, identification of specific IgE and open food challenge were conducted for the identification of food allergy. Elimination diet was performed with HPT. HPTs were conducted before and after food challenges. The wheal sizes by HPT were significantly decreased after an elimination diet. The relative changes of wheal sizes significantly correlated with those of clinical severity scores in AD patients (p<0.001). The wheal sizes in HPT were increased with a positive provocation in open food challenges. In conclusion, HPT may be a simple and objective test to interprete the results of food challenges in patients with AD. The exact mechanisms of the changes in skin reactivity by HPT need further investigation.


Subject(s)
Child , Humans , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Food , Histamine/metabolism , Skin Tests
13.
Journal of the Egyptian Society of Parasitology. 1998; 28 (1): 247-56
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-48291

ABSTRACT

Mucosal mast cell activity was quantified by measuring histamine forming capacity [HFC] of the gastric mucosa and histamine content in the intestinal tissues of mice infected with T. spiralis. The results were correlated with the kinetics of worm expulsion. It was found that T. spiralis resulted in significant elevation of HFC by the day 6 post infection [p.i.] which reached a maximal value at day 9, a time when approximately 50% of the established worm burden had been expelled. Histamine content of the intestinal tissues followed the same pattern. No intestinal worms were present by day 28 of infection and there was a gradual reduction in HFC and histamine content which had returned almost to control values by that time. Significant inverse correlation between individual worm burdens and HFC was detected


Subject(s)
Animals, Laboratory , Trichinellosis/physiopathology , Mice , Histamine/metabolism , Mast Cells , Stomach/chemistry , Intestines/chemistry
14.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 28(8): 895-901, Aug. 1995. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-156285

ABSTRACT

The role of mast cells in allergic reactions is reviewed and the origin, distribution and properties of mast cells are reported. The characteristics of two phenotypically distinct mast cell populations are described. The function and properties of the IgE molecule as an antigen receptor on mast cells is discussed. The participation of mast cells in the acute and late phase of the allergic reaction is pointed out. A double role for mast cells in allergic reactions is suggested: they may be responsible for the acute phase reaction through the release of mediators such as histamine and leukotrienes and for the late phase reaction through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.


Subject(s)
Humans , Hypersensitivity/physiopathology , Immunoglobulin E/physiology , Mast Cells/physiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Histamine/metabolism , Leukotrienes/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, IgE/physiology
15.
Rev. bras. neurol ; 29(3): 71-4, maio-jun. 1993. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-130124

ABSTRACT

Os autores resumem os principais achados de alteraçöes nos neurotransmissores cerebrais na demência degenerativa primária do tipo Alzheimer, tecendo consideraçöes sobre as possibilidades terapêuticas


Subject(s)
Humans , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Neurotransmitter Agents/metabolism , Acetylcholine/metabolism , Histamine/metabolism , Norepinephrine/metabolism , Brain Chemistry
16.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 1993 May; 31(5): 440-2
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-61618

ABSTRACT

The H1 and H2 receptor agonist histamine caused a powerful aggregation of B. melanostictus tail melanophores, which was completely blocked by metiamide, a specific H2 receptor antagonist, while mepyramine an H1 receptor blocker partially blocked the aggregating response. The strong melanin aggregating effect of 4-methyl histamine a specific H2 receptor agonist and its complete blockade by metiamide further supports the conclusion that there exists a dominant population of H2 type of histamine receptors along with sparse population of H1 receptor on the tail melanophores of the toad, which mediate centripetal movement of melanin granules within the pigment cells leading to blanching of the animal.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bufonidae , Embryo, Nonmammalian/drug effects , Histamine/metabolism , Melanophores/drug effects , Receptors, Histamine/drug effects
17.
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol ; 1992 Oct; 36(4): 285-6
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-107229
18.
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol ; 1992 Oct; 36(4): 255-8
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-107821

ABSTRACT

Effects of progesterone on four neurotransmitters (viz, noradrenaline, 5-HT, dopamine and histamine) of brain were seen in rats with intact ovaries. It was found that progesterone lowers the noradrenaline concentration in medulla, pons, midbrain, hypothalamus, thalami and pituitary, uniformly, when the rats were killed within 4 hours of progesterone injection. At longer intervals (48 hrs) effects of progesterone were seen when progesterone in heavy dose was administered to rats pretreated with estrogen. It is likely that one of the modes of action of the oral contraceptives may be the reduction of noradrenaline content in selected areas of brain, by progesterone. It is also suggested, therapeutic usage of progesterone carries the risk of development of depression in the user.


Subject(s)
Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain Stem/drug effects , Dopamine/metabolism , Female , Histamine/metabolism , Hypothalamus/drug effects , Neurotransmitter Agents/metabolism , Norepinephrine/metabolism , Pituitary Gland/drug effects , Progesterone/pharmacology , Rats , Serotonin/metabolism
19.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol ; 1990 Dec; 8(2): 133-6
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-36447

ABSTRACT

The mechanisms involved in adverse reactions to local anaesthetic (LA) agents are poorly understood. True IgE-mediated reactions appear to be rare. We report a patient with panhypogammaglobulinemia who developed anaphylactoid reactions to two different LAs (lignocaine and procaine), associated with positive intradermal skin tests to these agents as well as prilocaine, despite absent detectable IgE in the serum and a negative RAST test to procaine. We conclude that direct histamine release induced by LA is likely to be the major mechanism in this case.


Subject(s)
Adult , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage , Female , Histamine/metabolism , Humans , Immunoglobulin E/deficiency , Injections, Intramuscular , Lidocaine/adverse effects , Prilocaine/adverse effects , Procaine/adverse effects
20.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 23(3/4): 275-81, 1990. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-91746

ABSTRACT

1. In order to study local tissue anaphylactic responses to infection with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, mice of three different strains (C57BL/10J, Balb/cJ and CBA/J were infected by subcutaneous injection of 15 to 20 cercariae. Eleben to 16 weeks later the animals were reinfected though one ear with 250 to 350 cercriae. 2. Throughout the infection period, the histamine content of the ears uncresed up to 150% of control values. Upon reinfection, the penetration of cercariae through the ear reduced its histmaine content to near normal values. 3. Reinfection causes inflammation as judged by a 1.5 to 2.3-fold increase in the amounts of plasma leaking through the ear vessels as measured by leakage of Evan blue dy. 4. These results suggest that the local inflammatory reaction mediated by mast cells is important in the resistance of mice to reinfection wiwth S. mansoni


Subject(s)
Mice , Animals , Anaphylaxis/etiology , Histamine/metabolism , Schistosoma mansoni/physiology , Schistosomiasis mansoni/physiopathology , Immunity, Cellular , Mast Cells/immunology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Inbred CBA , Skin/metabolism
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