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1.
Arq. bras. med. vet. zootec. (Online) ; 73(1): 141-154, Jan.-Feb. 2021. tab, graf, ilus
Article in English | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1153057

ABSTRACT

The consumption of inadequately thermally treated fish is a public health risk due to the possible propagation of Anisakis larvae and their antigenic proteins, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease anisakidosis. The present study demonstrated the physiological and histopathological changes that accompanied an oral inoculation of crude extracts from fresh and thermally treated Anisakis Type II (L3) in Wistar albino rats. Nematode worms were isolated from the marine fish Dicentrarchus labrax. They were examined and taxonomically identified using light and scanning electron microscopy. The study was performed in 6 rat groups: a control group (I), a garlic oil (GO) inoculated group (II), a fresh L3 inoculated group (III), a thermally treated L3 inoculated group (IV), a fresh L3 + GO inoculated group (V), and a thermally treated L3 + GO inoculated group (VI). It was observed that rats inoculated with fresh and thermally treated L3 crude extracts showed abnormal oxidative stress markers associated with the destruction of normal architecture of spleen and thymus. GO produced a protective effect in rat groups inoculated with L3 extracts + GO administration via the amelioration of oxidative stress markers, which was confirmed by the marked normal structure of the organs' histology. Cooking of L3 infected fish induced severe physiological and histopathological alterations compared to uncooked infected fish. The administration of garlic before and after fish eating is recommended to avoid the dangerous effect of anisakids, even if they are cooked.(AU)


O consumo de peixes tratados termicamente de forma inadequada é um risco à saúde pública devido à possível propagação das larvas de Anisakis e suas proteínas antigênicas, o agente causador da doença zoonótica anisakidose. O presente estudo demonstrou as alterações fisiológicas e histopatológicas que acompanharam a inoculação oral de extratos brutos de Anisakis Tipo II (L3) frescos e termicamente tratados em ratos Wistar albinos. Vermes nematoides foram isolados do peixe marinho Dicentrarchus labrax e foram examinados e identificados taxonomicamente usando microscopia óptica e eletrônica de varredura. O estudo foi realizado em 6 grupos de ratos: grupo controle (I), grupo inoculado com óleo de alho (GO) (II), grupo inoculado com L3 fresco (III), grupo inoculado com L3 tratado termicamente (IV), grupo inoculado com L3 + GO fresco (V), e grupo inoculado com L3 + GO tratado termicamente (VI). Observou-se que ratos inoculados com extrato bruto L3 fresco e tratado termicamente mostraram marcadores de estresse oxidativo anormais associados à destruição da estrutura normal do baço e do timo. GO produziu um efeito protetor em grupos de ratos inoculados com extrato L3 + administração de GO através da melhoria dos marcadores de estresse oxidativo, que foi confirmada pela marcante estrutura normal da histologia dos órgãos. O cozimento de peixes infectados com L3 induziu alterações fisiológicas e histopatológicas graves quando comparado com peixes infectados não cozidos. Recomenda-se a administração de alho antes e depois da ingestão do peixe para evitar o efeito perigoso dos anisakídeos, mesmo se cozidos.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Anisakis , Anisakiasis/therapy , Anisakiasis/veterinary , Fishes/parasitology , Garlic/chemistry , Plant Oils/chemistry , Rats, Wistar
2.
Braz. arch. biol. technol ; 64: e21190253, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1153292

ABSTRACT

HIGHLIGHTS Essential oils from populations of B. dracunculifolia were investigated. β-pinene and (E)-nerolidol were the main compounds in B. dracunculifolia populations. The difference in the chemical profile of the essential oils is quantitative only. There is a negative correlation between the antioxidant activity and spathulenol.


Abstract Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. is a Brazilian native plant, presenting wide chemical diversity and numerous pharmaceutical and industrial applications. This research assessed the yield, antioxidant activity and the chemical similarity of essential oils from 10 populations of B. dracunculifolia in the state of Paraná, southern Brazil. The extraction of the volatile compounds was carried out by hydrodistillation, the chemical composition was determined by GC/FID and GC/MS and the antioxidant activity by the DPPH method. The essential oil yield of wild B. dracunculifolia populations ranged from 0.14 to 0.87%. The oils were predominantly composed of oxygenated sesquiterpenes (34.16 - 51.01%), monoterpene hydrocarbons (18.02 - 46.17%) and sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons (9.60 - 17.70%). The major compounds found in all populations were β-pinene (7.65 - 29.8%) and (E)-nerolidol (9.11 - 21.68%). Essential oil solutions (20%) from different populations presented antioxidant capacity ranging from 27.78 to 91.67%. A negative correlation was found between the antioxidant activity and spathulenol (r = -0.696). Multivariate analyses separated the populations into three groups: (1) low concentrations of α-pinene (2.02 - 2.06%), (2) high concentrations of α-pinene (4.17 - 4.61%) and β-pinene (22.54 - 29.80%), and (3) intermediate concentrations of α-pinene (2.38 - 3.31%), β-pinene (12.77 - 19.03%) and spathulenol (6.02 - 9.06%).


Subject(s)
Plant Oils/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Baccharis/chemistry , Antioxidants/chemistry , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Plant Oils/isolation & purification , Brazil , Oils, Volatile/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
3.
Rev. chil. nutr ; 47(1): 57-66, feb. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1092744

ABSTRACT

The potential use of babassu (Orbignya phalerata Mart.) in several activities is large. In view of these facts, this study aimed to determine the physicochemical composition of the babassu almond (OpAM) and evaluate the chemical, physical and physicochemical aspects of babassu coconut oil isolated by different methods of extraction. Babassu nut oil was removed by extraction with a hot solvent (Soxhlet) (OpS), hydraulic pressure (OpHP) and cold extraction (Blight and Dyer) (OpBD). Two artisanal samples from the states of Pará (OpP) and Maranhão (OPM) were also tested. OpAM presented 2% protein, 49.5% fat, 42.4% carbohydrates and water activity of 0.670. No statistical differences were found between the babassu coconut extraction techniques which presents saturated fatty acids as major oil fatty acids, especially lauric (41.6%), myristic (14.6%) and unsaturated oleic (15.7%). No samples tested positive in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances test, and they also showed low levels of acidity. Babassu coconut oil showed good oxidative stability with a high induction period. The samples tended to green and yellow colors, and the babassu oil extracted by Soxhlet was less viscous than the others.


El uso potencial de babassu (Orbignya phalerata Mart.), en varias actividades es amplio. En vista de esto, este estudio tuvo como objetivo determinar la composición fisicoquímica de la almendra de babassu (OpAM) y evaluar los aspectos químicos, físicos y físicoquímicos del aceite de coco de babassu aislado mediante diferentes métodos de extracción. El aceite de coco de babasú se aisló mediante extracción con un disolvente caliente (Soxhlet) (OpS), mediante presión hidráulica (OpHP) y utilizando un disolvente frío (Blight and Dyer) (OpBD). También se analizaron dos muestras artesanales de los estados de Pará (OpP) y Maranhão (OPM). OpAM presentó 2% de proteína, 49,5% de grasa, 42,4% de carbohidratos y una actividad de agua de 0,670. No se encontraron diferencias estadísticas entre las técnicas de extracción de babassu de coco que presentan ácidos grasos saturados como los principales ácidos grasos oleosos, especialmente láurico (41,6%), mirístico (14,6%) y oleico insaturado (15,7%). Ninguna muestra resultó positiva en la prueba de sustancias reactivas al ácido tiobarbitúrico, y también mostraron niveles bajos de acidez. El aceite de coco Babassu mostró una buena estabilidad oxidativa con un alto período de inducción. Las muestras tendían a los colores verde y amarillo, y el aceite de babassu extraído por Soxhlet era menos viscoso que los otros.


Subject(s)
Plant Oils/chemistry , Plant Extracts , Arecaceae/chemistry , Nutritive Value , Carbohydrates/analysis , Proteins/analysis , Fats/analysis
4.
Braz. arch. biol. technol ; 63: e20190481, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1132242

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomass and essential oil production of nine populations of poejo (Cunila galioides) cultivated in five agroecological regions of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, under different edaphoclimatic conditions. The experiments were performed in field conditions in Erechim, Caxias do Sul, Pelotas, São Francisco de Paula, and Santa Vitoria do Palmar. The experimental design was completely randomized, with nine populations, eight plants per plot and four repetitions. The following were evaluated: biomass production and essential oil chemical composition and yield. The data underwent ANOVA, followed by Tukey's multiple range test. The adaptability and stability of the populations in the different environments were also evaluated by regression analysis. The results showed great differences between the populations and cultivation sites, with genotype vs. environment interaction. Most populations presented the best biomass production results at Erechim. Pelotas and Santa Vitória do Palmar were the worst locations for poejo production, mainly due to a water deficit occurred during the experiment. The Santa Lucia population presented broad stability and the greatest adaptability to the environments for biomass and essential oil production, but its average production was not satisfactory. The André da Rocha population presented the highest average production of essential oil, and was favored in favorable environments. Regarding essential oil chemical composition, the populations kept stable contents of the major compounds at all locations, with a few variations. In some populations, a higher concentration of sesquiterpenes was observed, which can be attributed to environmental stress.


Subject(s)
Plant Oils/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Biomass , Lamiaceae/genetics , Sesquiterpenes , Soil/chemistry , Tropical Climate , Regression Analysis , Analysis of Variance , Genotype
5.
Braz. arch. biol. technol ; 63: e20190351, 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1132165

ABSTRACT

Abstract Each year, the consumption of vegetable oils increases gradually. Some oils, such as chia, sesame, and quinoa, are consumed due to the nutritional properties and health promoters that have been recognized in their components. Based on this premise, the present study aimed to characterize chia (Salvia hispanica), sesame (Sesamum inducum), and quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) oils, in order to enable their applications in the development of new food products. Chia oil presented higher degradation, as it stood out with higher amounts of free fatty acids (4.46%) and peroxide value (18.35 meq/kg). It is an oil that is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (75.47%), and, consequently, with high refractive index (1,475) and iodine value (192.86 g/100 g). Quinoa oil stood out for its higher oxidative stability (17.55 h) and higher amount of phenolic compounds (190.84 mg/100 g). Sesame and quinoa oils showed no significant difference for carotenoids, but sesame oil had higher content of total tocopherols (656.50 mg/kg). Thus, the oils can be used in technological processes and/ or in the formulation of new food products, in order to their increase the nutritional value.


Subject(s)
Plant Oils/chemistry , Sesame Oil/chemistry , Chenopodium quinoa/chemistry , Salvia/chemistry
6.
Braz. arch. biol. technol ; 63: e20190478, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1132255

ABSTRACT

Abstract The pulp oil of Caryocar brasiliense Camb., better known as pequi, is used in the typical cuisine of the Brazilian Cerrado region. It is also used in folk medicine to combat several types of disease of the respiratory system and skin. However, since its exploration is purely extractive, the exhaustion of this plant is already foreseen. Thus, in order to establish the sustainable use of pequi and contribute to its maintenance, this study aimed to develop a phytocosmetic with antioxidant and photoprotective properties using the oil of this fruit. Initially, the cytotoxicity of the oil was evaluated in order to establish the safety of its use and its fatty acid composition. Then, from the cream enriched with the oil, it was evaluated the antioxidant and photoprotector potentials, quantified the total phenolic content and examined the quality of the formulation. Pequi oil showed high percentages of palmitic (52.11%) and oleic (44.57%) fatty acids and absence of cytotoxicity. The analysis of the cream revealed 168.8 mg of total phenols in gallic acid equivalent per 100 g of oil. The evaluation of antioxidant activity showed an EC50 of 2.921 mg/mL and a capacity of inhibiting the lipoperoxidation process higher than 100%. The obtained sun protection factor was 11.40 at the concentration of 6.25 mg/mL. The quality tests revealed small disturbances in the cream stability that can be solved by further research and improvement of the formulation. The pequi oil can be converted into a phytocosmetic of great commercial value.


Subject(s)
Humans , Sunscreening Agents/analysis , Plant Oils/chemistry , Cosmetics/chemistry , Ericales/chemistry , Toxicity Tests , Phytochemicals
7.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e001, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089393

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study analyzed the effect of prior application of copaiba oil (CO) emulsions as a dentin cleaning substance on microleakage and microtensile adhesive strength. Twenty-five premolars and sixty-four molars were used for microleakage and microtensile assays. For the microleakage assays, specimens with standard class V cavities were divided (n = 5), according to the tested CO emulsions: CO10%X, CO10%Y, and CO10%Z, as well as chlorhexidine 2% (CHX) and distilled water (DW), as positive and negative controls, respectively. Restorations were performed using the Adper Single Bond® and/or Clearfil SE Bond® systems. Cervical, occlusal, distal and mesial sections were assessed for tracer penetration degree at the composite/tooth interface. For the microtensile assay, healthy molars were divided into sixteen groups, in which artificial caries were induced in half of the groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with CO10%X and CO10%Y, CHX and DW. Microtensile bond strength was measured by fixing each sample to the plate of a universal testing machine operated at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. Dentin treated with CO10%X showed a lower infiltration rate than dentin treated with the other CO emulsions, CHX2% and DW. According to the microtensile assay, both healthy and affected dentin treated with CO10%X and Adper Single Bond® adhesive system presented higher adhesive strength. CO emulsion, used as a dentin biomodifier, interfered positively in microleakage and improved adhesive strength after acid etching in the Adper Single Bond® adhesive system, or before applying the Clearfil SE Bond® self-etching system.


Subject(s)
Humans , Plant Oils/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Fabaceae/chemistry , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Materials Testing , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Leakage , Dentin/chemistry , Emulsions/chemistry
8.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e001, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1055529

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study analyzed the effect of prior application of copaiba oil (CO) emulsions as a dentin cleaning substance on microleakage and microtensile adhesive strength. Twenty-five premolars and sixty-four molars were used for microleakage and microtensile assays. For the microleakage assays, specimens with standard class V cavities were divided (n = 5), according to the tested CO emulsions: CO10%X, CO10%Y, and CO10%Z, as well as chlorhexidine 2% (CHX) and distilled water (DW), as positive and negative controls, respectively. Restorations were performed using the Adper Single Bond® and/or Clearfil SE Bond® systems. Cervical, occlusal, distal and mesial sections were assessed for tracer penetration degree at the composite/tooth interface. For the microtensile assay, healthy molars were divided into sixteen groups, in which artificial caries were induced in half of the groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with CO10%X and CO10%Y, CHX and DW. Microtensile bond strength was measured by fixing each sample to the plate of a universal testing machine operated at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. Dentin treated with CO10%X showed a lower infiltration rate than dentin treated with the other CO emulsions, CHX2% and DW. According to the microtensile assay, both healthy and affected dentin treated with CO10%X and Adper Single Bond® adhesive system presented higher adhesive strength. CO emulsion, used as a dentin biomodifier, interfered positively in microleakage and improved adhesive strength after acid etching in the Adper Single Bond® adhesive system, or before applying the Clearfil SE Bond® self-etching system.


Subject(s)
Humans , Plant Oils/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Fabaceae/chemistry , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Materials Testing , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Leakage , Dentin/chemistry , Emulsions/chemistry
9.
Rev. chil. nutr ; 46(6): 783-791, dic. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1058142

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The need to obtain nutritious foods from new sources and lower waste in industry has created a high interest in studying different parts of plants or foods that today are considered waste, but could be considered by-products with high nutritional value with potential use in human diets. Pumpkin seeds are commonly considered as waste but they have a high content of fatty and amino acids, which when used as a by-product or ingredient can add value to food products. The aim of this work was to perform a wide review of the nutritional and functional properties of Cucurbita maxima seeds and their potential medicinal influence.


RESUMEN La necesidad de obtener alimentos nutritivos de nuevas fuentes y menores desperdicios en la industria ha generado un gran interés en el estudio de diferentes partes de plantas o alimentos que hoy en día se consideran desechos, pero que podrían considerarse subproductos con alto valor nutricional y uso potencial en alimentación humana. Las semillas de calabaza se consideran comúnmente como desechos, pero tienen un alto e importante contenido de ácidos grasos y aminoácidos, que cuando se utilizan como subproducto o ingrediente pueden aportar un alto valor agregado a los productos alimenticios. El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar una amplia revisión de las propiedades nutricionales y funcionales de las semillas de Cucurbita maxima y su potencial influencia medicinal asociada a ellas.


Subject(s)
Seeds/chemistry , Cucurbita/chemistry , Functional Food , Plant Oils/chemistry , Fatty Acids, Unsaturated/analysis , Flour , Amino Acids/analysis , Minerals/analysis , Nutritive Value
10.
ABCD arq. bras. cir. dig ; 32(3): e1451, 2019. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1038028

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: Hypovolemic shock is a common disease in polytrauma patients and may develop ischemia in various organs, increasing morbidity and mortality. The bowel is usually most affected by this condition. Aim: To evaluate the effects of copaiba oil on the intestinal mucosa's injury of rats submitted to hypovolemic shock. Method: Fifteen rats were divided into three groups: sham - simulated surgery; ischemia - animals submitted to hypovolemic shock; and copaiba - animals submitted to hypovolemic shock previously treated with copaiba oil. Mean blood pressure, arterial blood gas after shock induction, degree of intestinal lesion and villus length were evaluated. Results: The sham presented the lowest values of lactate and PaCO2 and the highest values of mean arterial pressure, pH and bicarbonate in relation to the other groups. The degree of mesenteric lesion was zero in the sham group; 3.00±1.00 in the ischemia group; and 3.00±0.71 in the copaiba group. The villus length was 173.60±8.42 in the sham, 142.77±8.33 in the ischemia and 143.01±9.57 in the copaiba group. There was a significant difference between the sham and the other groups (p<0.05); however, there not significant difference between groups Ischemia and copaiba. Conclusion: Administration of copaiba oil did not reduce the intestinal mucosa lesion of rats after hypovolemic shock.


RESUMO Racional: O choque hipovolêmico é situação comum em pacientes politraumatizados, podendo acarretar isquemia de vários órgãos, aumentando a morbimortalidade. O intestino é geralmente um dos órgãos mais afetados por essa condição. Objetivo: Avaliar os efeitos do óleo de copaíba na lesão da mucosa intestinal de ratos submetidos ao choque hipovolêmico. Métodos: Quinze ratos foram distribuídos em três grupos: Sham - operação simulada; isquemia - submissão ao choque hipovolêmico; e copaíba - submissão ao choque hipovolêmico previamente tratados com óleo de copaíba. A pressão arterial média, a gasometria arterial após a indução do choque, o grau da lesão intestinal e o tamanho das vilosidades foram avaliados. Resultados: O grupo sham apresentou os menores valores de lactato e PaCO2 e os maiores valores de pressão arterial média, pH e bicarbonato em relação aos demais grupos. O grau de lesão mesentérica foi de zero no sham; 3,0±1,00 no grupo isquemia; e 3,0±0,71 no da copaíba. O comprimento dos vilos foi de 173,60±8,42 no grupo sham, 142,77±8,33 no da isquemia e 143,01±9,57 no da copaíba. Houve diferença significante entre o grupo sham e os demais grupos (p<0.05); contudo, não houve diferença estatística entre os grupos submetidos ao choque hipovolêmico. Conclusão: A administração do óleo de copaíba não reduziu a lesão da mucosa intestinal de ratos submetidos ao choque hipovolêmico.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Shock/drug therapy , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , Fabaceae/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Plant Oils/therapeutic use , Plant Oils/chemistry , Random Allocation , Rats, Wistar , Disease Models, Animal , Ileum/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Ischemia/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry
11.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 52(2): e8209, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-984033

ABSTRACT

Vegetable oils have been used for a plethora of health benefits by their incorporation in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products, especially those intended for skin care. This study aimed to investigate the cutaneous benefits of a vegetable oil blend (VOB) formulation and its fatty acid composition. The anti-inflammatory activity was studied in macrophages of RAW 264.7 cells by investigating the release of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anion generation (O2-), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). ABTS cation radical scavenging capacity assay, ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and NO free radical scavenging assays were used to evaluate the antioxidant activity. VOB was tested for its ability to stimulate fibroblast proliferation and migration using the scratch assay, and antibacterial activity by the microdilution test. The fatty acid profile of a freshly prepared VOB formulation was determined by gas chromatography before and after accelerated stability testing. Chemical composition of VOB revealed the presence of oleic acid (C18:1n-9; 63.3%), linoleic acid (C18:2n-6; 4.7%), and linolenic acid (C18:3n-6; 5.1%) as major mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. No changes in the organoleptic characteristics and fatty acid composition were observed after the accelerated stability test. VOB 100 µg/mL reduced the healing time by increasing the total number of cells in the wounded area by 43.0±5.1% compared to the negative control group. VOB also suppressed the pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines, and NO and O2- production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage cells. In conclusion, the VOB formulation contributed to the improvement of current therapeutic strategies for cutaneous applications in skin care.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rabbits , Wound Healing/drug effects , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Fatty Acids/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Plant Oils/chemistry , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Skin Care , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Fibroblasts/drug effects
12.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(5): 431-438, May 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-949342

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the effects of this thymol-rich oil in the proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells. Methods: Stem cells were isolated from human adipose tissue by liposuction. After the first passage, cells were cultivated in triplicate for three days in control medium and medium supplemented with three oil samples (1.0 μg/mL, 5.0 μg/mL, and 25.0 μg/mL). Cells were analyzed by the MTT assay at passage 1 (P1), and cell proliferation of control and 1 μg/mL groups was determined with a hemocytometer at P2 and P3. Results: Viability of the essential oil-treated cells was significantly higher than the control group at P1 (p = 0.0008). The treatment with the oil, at a concentration of 1 µg/mL, led to increases of 24.8% at P1 and 43.0% at P3 in the rate of cell proliferation compared with control cells. Conclusion: Supplementing culture medium with essential oil of Lippia origanoides increased cell proliferation, especially at later passages.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adult , Thymol/pharmacology , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Lippia/chemistry , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Stem Cells/drug effects , Plant Oils/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Lipectomy , Adipose Tissue/cytology , Culture Media
13.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(supl.1): 229-235, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974342

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Gallesia integrifolia (Phytolaccaceae) is native to Brazil and has a strong alliaceous odor. The objective of this study was to identify the chemical composition of G. integrifolia fruit essential oil and evaluate fungicidal activity against the main food-borne diseases and food spoilage fungi. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and identified by GC-MS. From 35 identified compounds, 68% belonged to the organosulfur class. The major compounds were dimethyl trisulfide (15.49%), 2,8-dithianonane (52.63%) and lenthionine (14.69%). The utilized fungi were Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium funiculosum, Penicillium ochrochloron, Penicillium verrucosum var. cyclopium, and Trichoderma viride. Minimal fungicidal concentration for the essential oil varied from 0.02 to 0.18 mg/mL and bifonazole and ketoconazole controls ranged from 0.20 to 3.50 mg/mL. The lower concentration of the essential oil was able to control P. ochrochloron, A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus and T. viride. This study shows a high fungicidal activity of G. integrifolia fruit essential oil and can support future applications by reducing the use of synthetic fungicides.


Subject(s)
Plant Oils/pharmacology , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Phytolaccaceae/chemistry , Fungicides, Industrial/pharmacology , Penicillium/growth & development , Penicillium/drug effects , Aspergillus/growth & development , Aspergillus/drug effects , Plant Oils/chemistry , Brazil , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Fruit/chemistry , Fungicides, Industrial/chemistry , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
14.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(4): 629-636, Oct.-Dec. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889175

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are efficient, renewable and environment friendly polymeric esters. These polymers are synthesized by a variety of microbes under stress conditions. This study was carried out to check the suitability of waste frying oil in comparison to other oils for economical bioplastic production. Six bacterial strains were isolated and identified as Bacillus cereus (KF270349), Klebsiella pneumoniae (KF270350), Bacillus subtilis (KF270351), Brevibacterium halotolerance (KF270352), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KF270353), and Stenotrophomonas rhizoposid (KF270354) by ribotyping. All strains were PHA producers so were selected for PHA synthesis using four different carbon sources, i.e., waste frying oil, canola oil, diesel and glucose. Extraction of PHA was carried out using sodium hypochlorite method and maximum amount was detected after 72 h in all cases. P. aeruginosa led to maximum PHA production after 72 h at 37 °C and 100 rpm using waste frying oil that was 53.2% PHA in comparison with glucose 37.8% and cooking oil 34.4%. B. cereus produced 40% PHA using glucose as carbon source which was high when compared against other strains. A significantly lesser amount of PHA was recorded with diesel as a carbon source for all strains. Sharp Infrared peaks around 1740-1750 cm-1 were present in Fourier Transform Infrared spectra that correspond to exact position for PHA. The use of waste oils and production of poly-3hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate (3HB-co-3HV) by strains used in this study is a good aspect to consider for future prospects as this type of polymer has better properties as compared to PHBs.


Subject(s)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/metabolism , Bacillus cereus/metabolism , Polyhydroxyalkanoates/biosynthesis , Hydrocarbons/metabolism , Waste Products/analysis , Plant Oils/metabolism , Plant Oils/chemistry , Gasoline/analysis , Biotransformation
15.
An. acad. bras. ciênc ; 89(3): 1671-1681, July-Sept. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886765

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were obtained from vegetable oils of soybean, corn and sunflower. The current study was focused on evaluating the antifungal activity of FAMEs mainly against Paracoccidioides spp., as well as testing the interaction of these compounds with commercial antifungal drugs and also their antioxidant potential. FAMEs presented small IC50 values (1.86-9.42 μg/mL). All three FAMEs tested showed antifungal activity against isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. with MIC values ranging from 15.6-500 µg/mL. Sunflower FAMEs exhibited antifungal activity that extended also to other genera, with an MIC of 15.6 μg/mL against Candida glabrata and C. krusei and 31.2 μg/mL against C. parapsilosis. FAMEs exhibited a synergetic effect with itraconazole. The antifungal activity of the FAMEs against isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. is likely due to the presence of methyl linoleate, the major compound present in all three FAMEs. The results obtained indicate the potential of FAMEs as sources for antifungal and antioxidant activity.


Subject(s)
Paracoccidioides/drug effects , Picrates/pharmacology , Soybeans/chemistry , Biphenyl Compounds/pharmacology , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Zea mays/chemistry , Helianthus/chemistry , Antifungal Agents/pharmacology , Picrates/isolation & purification , Biphenyl Compounds/isolation & purification , Plant Oils/chemistry , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Drug Resistance, Fungal , Lethal Dose 50 , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Antifungal Agents/isolation & purification
16.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e11, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839534

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the removal of filling material with ProTaper Universal Rotary Retreatment system (PTR) combined with solvents and the influence of solvents on the bond strength (PBS) of sealer to intraradicular dentin after canal reobturation. Roots were endodontically treated and distributed to five groups (n = 12). The control group was not retreated. In the four experimental groups, canals were retreated with PTR alone or in combination with xylol, orange oil, and eucalyptol. After filling material removal, two specimens of each group were analysed by SEM and µCT to verify the presence of filling remnants on root canal walls. The other roots were reobturated and sectioned in 1-mm-thick dentin slices that were subjected to the push-out test. Data were analysed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05). SEM and µCT analysis revealed that all retreatment techniques left filling remnants on canal walls. The control group (3.47 ± 1.21) presented significantly higher (p < 0.05) PBS than the experimental groups. The groups retreated with PTR alone (2.59 ± 0.99) or combined with xylol (2.54 ± 0.77) and orange oil (2.32 ± 0.93) presented similar bond strength (p > 0.05), and differed significantly from the group with eucalyptol (1.89 ± 0.63). The solvents reduced the PBS of the sealer to dentin and no retreatment technique promoted complete removal of filling material.


Subject(s)
Humans , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Solvents/chemistry , Analysis of Variance , Cyclohexanols/chemistry , Dental Bonding , Dental Instruments , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Gutta-Percha , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Monoterpenes/chemistry , Plant Oils/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Retreatment/instrumentation , Root Canal Preparation/instrumentation
17.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(1): 37-44, Jan.-Feb. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-777355

ABSTRACT

Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the volume of remaining filling material after passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and orange oil in mesial canals of mandibular molars, with and without isthmus. Material and Methods Thirty mesial roots of mandibular molars were divided according to the presence or absence of isthmus. Canals were prepared and filled (Micro-CT #1). Filling was removed using rotary instruments, and specimens were sub-divided into three groups according to the irrigation procedures: Conventional – conventional irrigation with NaOCl, PUI/NaOCl – PUI of NaOCl (three activations, 20 seconds each), and PUI/orange oil – PUI of orange oil (Micro-CT#2). Specimens were enlarged using the X2 and X3 ProTaper Next instruments and submitted to the same irrigation protocols (Micro-CT #3). Results No differences were found between the experimental groups in each stage of assessment (P>0.05). The volume of residual filling material was similar to that in Micro-CT #2 and Micro-CT #3, but lower than that observed in Micro-CT #1 (P<0.05). When groups were pooled according to the presence or absence of an isthmus, volume of residual filling material was higher in specimens presenting isthmus (P<0.05). Conclusions PUI of NaOCl or orange oil did not improve filling removal. Isthmus consists in an anatomical obstacle that impairs the removal of filling material.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Filling Materials , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods , Plant Oils/chemistry , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Time Factors , Tooth Root/anatomy & histology , Ultrasonic Therapy/instrumentation , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Root Canal Preparation/instrumentation , Retreatment , X-Ray Microtomography , Therapeutic Irrigation/instrumentation , Therapeutic Irrigation/methods , Mandible , Molar/anatomy & histology
18.
Arch. latinoam. nutr ; 65(2): 128-135, June 2015. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-752724

ABSTRACT

En este trabajo se evaluaron la composición, algunas características físicas (densidad, índice de refracción y color), capacidad antioxidante (DPPH) y perfil de ácidos grasos de semillas de mostaza negra (Brassica nigra) y amarilla (Brassica alba), sus aceites y residuos de la extracción del aceite. La densidad de los aceites de mostaza negra y amarilla fue de 0,912 ± 0,01 y 0,916 ± 0,01 g/mL, respectivamente; y el índice de refracción fue de 1,4611 ± 0,01 y 1,4617 ± 0,01, respectivamente, no mostrando diferencias significativas (p>0,05) entre las dos mostazas. Los parámetros de color del aceite de semilla de mostaza negra y amarilla tienden hacia los tonos amarillos-verdosos y tonos amarillos-rojizos, respectivamente; respecto a la actividad antioxidante, se observó una variación desde 25 mg equivalentes de Trolox/100 g en el aceite de semilla de mostaza amarilla hasta 1,366 mg equivalentes de Trolox/100 g en la pasta residual de mostaza negra. El perfil de ácidos grasos de la semillas de mostaza negra muestran que el ácido graso predominante es el oleico (22,96%), seguido por linoleico (6,63%) y linolénico (3,22%), mientras que para la semilla de mostaza amarilla es el erúcico (6,87%), seguido por oleico (5,08%) y linoléico (1,87%).


The composition, some physical properties (density, refraction index, and color), antioxidant capacity (DPPH), and fatty acid profile of seeds of black (Brassica nigra) or yellow mustard (Brassica alba) were evaluated, as well as for their oils and residues from oil extraction. Density of the black and yellow mustard oils were 0.912 ± 0.01 and 0.916 ± 0.01 g/mL, respectively; their refraction indexes were 1.4611 ± 0.01 and 1.4617 ± 0.01, respectively; being not significantly different (p>0.05) between two mustards. Color parameters of the black and yellow mustard oils presented greenish-yellow tones and reddish-yellow tones, respectively; regarding antioxidant activities, these ranged from 25 mg equivalents of Trolox/100 g in the yellow mustard oil to 1,366 mg equivalents of Trolox/100 g in the residues from oil extraction of black seed mustard. The fatty acid profile of the black mustard seed revealed that its predominant fatty acid is oleic (22.96%), followed by linoleic (6.63%) and linolenic (3.22%), whereas for yellow mustard seed the major fatty acid is erucic (6.87%), followed by oleic (5.08%) and linoleic (1.87%) acids.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/analysis , Mustard Plant/chemistry , Seeds/chemistry , Color , Fatty Acids/analysis , Plant Oils/chemistry , Refractometry
19.
Rev. biol. trop ; 63(1): 303-311, Jan.-Mar. 2015. ilus, mapas, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-753795

ABSTRACT

Pimenta is a genus of flowering plants in the Myrtaceae family, which has about 15 species, mostly found in the Caribbean region of the Americas. Commonly used for culinary and medicinal purposes, the best known commercial species are allspice, P. dioica (P. officinalis) and bay rum, P. racemosa, but there is little information concerning P. guatemalensis. The aim of the present study was to identify the chemical composition of the leaf and fruit essential oils of P. guatemalensis. The extraction of essential oils of P. guatemalensis growing wild in Costa Rica was carried out by the hydrodistillation method at atmospheric pressure, using a modified Clevenger type apparatus. The chemical composition of the oils was analyzed by capillary gas chromatographyflame ionization detector (GC/FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using the retention indices on DB-5 type capillary column. A total of 103 and 63 compounds were identified in the leaf and fruit oils, respectively, corresponding to 96.8% and 86.1% of the total amount of the oils. The leaf oil consisted mainly of eugenol (72.8%), and mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (18.2%). Among terpenes the major components were β-caryophyllene (8.2%) and terpinolene (3.0%). The fruit oil also consisted mainly of eugenol (74.7%) and minor amounts of oxygenated mono- and sesquiterpenes (7.3%), mainly caryophyllene oxide (3.3%). This is the first report of the chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from this plant species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 63 (1): 303-311. Epub 2015 March 01.


Pimenta es un género de plantas perteneciente a la familia Myrtaceae que contiene cerca de 15 especies, la mayoría ubicadas en las regiones del Caribe del Continente Americano, donde es utilizado con propósitos culinarios y medicinales. Las especies comerciales mejor conocidas son “pimienta de Jamaica” (P. dioica o P. officinalis) y “bay-rum” (P. racemosa) y existe muy poca información científica acerca de la especie P. guatemalensis. Cuando las hojas y frutos son triturados, desprenden un aroma de composición desconocida. El objetivo del presente estudio fue identificar la composición química de los aceites esenciales de las hojas y frutos de P. guatemalensis. La extracción de los aceites esenciales de P. guatemalensis, una especie arbórea silvestre en Costa Rica, se efectuó mediante el método de hidrodestilación a presión atmosférica, empleando un aparato de vidrio de tipo Clevenger. Se analizó la composición química de los aceites esenciales mediante cromatografía de gases con detector de ionización de flama (GC/FID) y cromatografía de gases acoplada a un detector de masas (GC/MS) y, utilizando índices de retención en una columna cromatográfica capilar tipo DB-5. En los aceites de hojas se identificaron 103 y en los de frutos 63 compuestos, correspondiendo a 96.8% y 86.1%, respectivamente, de los constituyentes totales. El aceite de las hojas está constituido principalmente por compuestos de naturaleza fenilpropanoide (72.9%) y de hidrocarburos monoterpénicos y sesquiterpénicos (18.2%). Los componentes mayoritarios del aceite de las hojas se identificaron como eugenol (72.8%), β-cariofileno (8.2%) y terpinoleno (3.0%). El aceite de los frutos está constituido principalmente por eugenol (74.7%), monoterpenos y sesquiterpenos oxigenados (7.3%) principalmente óxido de cariofileno (3.3%). Este es el primer informe acerca de la composición química de aceites esenciales obtenidos a partir de esta especie vegetal.


Subject(s)
Fruit/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Genus Pimenta/chemistry , Plant Leaves/chemistry , Plant Oils/chemistry , Costa Rica , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Genus Pimenta/classification
20.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(1): 1-22, 03/02/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-741625

ABSTRACT

An increasingly asked question is 'can we confidently link bats with emerging viruses?'. No, or not yet, is the qualified answer based on the evidence available. Although more than 200 viruses - some of them deadly zoonotic viruses - have been isolated from or otherwise detected in bats, the supposed connections between bats, bat viruses and human diseases have been raised more on speculation than on evidence supporting their direct or indirect roles in the epidemiology of diseases (except for rabies). However, we are convinced that the evidence points in that direction and that at some point it will be proved that bats are competent hosts for at least a few zoonotic viruses. In this review, we cover aspects of bat biology, ecology and evolution that might be relevant in medical investigations and we provide a historical synthesis of some disease outbreaks causally linked to bats. We provide evolutionary-based hypotheses to tentatively explain the viral transmission route through mammalian intermediate hosts and to explain the geographic concentration of most outbreaks, but both are no more than speculations that still require formal assessment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification , Antioxidants/isolation & purification , Fatty Acids/analysis , Industrial Waste/analysis , Malus/chemistry , Plant Oils/isolation & purification , Seeds/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/economics , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , Antioxidants/adverse effects , Antioxidants/economics , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemical Phenomena , CHO Cells , Cricetulus , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Dietary Supplements/adverse effects , Dietary Supplements/economics , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/adverse effects , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/analysis , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/economics , Fatty Acids/adverse effects , Fatty Acids/economics , Food Preservatives/adverse effects , Food Preservatives/economics , Food Preservatives/isolation & purification , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Food-Processing Industry/economics , Fruit/chemistry , Fruit/economics , India , Industrial Waste/economics , Linoleic Acid/adverse effects , Linoleic Acid/analysis , Linoleic Acid/economics , Oleic Acid/adverse effects , Oleic Acid/analysis , Oleic Acid/economics , Plant Oils/chemistry , Plant Oils/economics , Plant Oils/pharmacology
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