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1.
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1287487

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the 6-month efficacy of natural tooth color change in in-office bleaching treatment in terms of time by using a spectrophotometer. Material and Methods: A total of 20 participants were chairside treated with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP), three applications each 20 minutes, in one appointment. Instrumental color measurement was performed on six anterior maxillary teeth before bleaching (baseline-t0), immediately after in-office bleaching and rehydration of the teeth (t1), 3 months (t2), and 6 months after bleaching treatment (t3). The spectrophotometer measured the tooth shades based on the CIE L*a*b* color notation system and Bleach index during the period of observation. CIE L*a*b* (ΔEab) color differences were calculated. Results: The color change at t1 was ΔEab = 3.2, at t2 was ΔEab = 1.8, at t3 was ΔEab = 1.2 and overall color change of in-office method was ΔEab = 3.6 (p<0.05). A significant effect for the mean CIEL*a*b* values was detected as within time b* values decreased significantly (p<0.05). Bleach index values significantly decreased during the time of observation, too (p<0.05). Conclusion: The in-office bleaching treatment using 40% hydrogen peroxide was effective, and the results showed a statistically significant decrease in color change during the period of 6-month observation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Tooth Bleaching , Spectrophotometers , Dental Offices , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/therapeutic use , Analysis of Variance , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Treatment Outcome , Bosnia and Herzegovina , Statistics, Nonparametric
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190384, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1134801

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives This study evaluated if the use of a bioactive glass-ceramic-based gel, named Biosilicate (BS), before, after or mixed with bleaching gel, could influence the inflammation of the dental pulp tissue of rats' molars undergoing dental bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methodology The upper molars of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus, albinus) were divided into Ble: bleached (35% H2O2, 30-min); Ble-BS: bleached and followed by BS-based gel application (20 min); BS-Ble: BS-based gel application and then bleaching; BS/7d-Ble: BS-based gel applications for 7 days and then bleaching; Ble+BS: blend of H2O2 with BS-based gel (1:1, 30-min); and control: placebo gel. After 2 and 30 days (n=10), the rats were euthanized for histological evaluation. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn statistical tests were performed (P<0.05). Results At 2 days, the Ble and Ble-BS groups had significant alterations in the pulp tissue, with an area of necrosis. The groups with the application of BS-based gel before H2O2 had moderate inflammation and partial disorganization in the occlusal third of the coronary pulp and were significantly different from the Ble in the middle and cervical thirds (P<0.05). The most favorable results were observed in the Ble+BS, which was similar to the control in all thirds of the coronary pulp (P>0.05). At 30 days, the pulp tissue was organized and the bleached groups presented tertiary dentin deposition. The Ble group had the highest deposition of tertiary dentin, followed by the Ble-BS, and both were different from control (P<0.05). Conclusion A single BS-based gel application beforehand or BS-based gel blended with a bleaching gel minimize the pulp damage induced by dental bleaching.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Pulpitis/prevention & control , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Glass/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Pulpitis/chemically induced , Pulpitis/pathology , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Dental Pulp/pathology , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Molar
3.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190163, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1090782

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of commercial whitening dentifrices on erosive tooth wear (ETW) of bovine enamel samples, in comparison with commercial regular dentifrices. Methodology Sixty bovine crowns were embedded in acrylic resin, polished and then had their baseline profile determined. They were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n=12/group), according to the type of commercial dentifrice to be tested: GI - Crest Anti-cavity Regular; GII - Crest 3D White; GIII - Colgate Total 12 Clean Mint; GIV - Colgate Optic White; GV - Placebo (negative control, fluoride-free dentifrice). The samples were submitted to daily erosive and abrasive challenges for 3 days. The erosive challenges were performed 3 times a day by immersing the specimens in 0.1% citric acid solution (pH 2.5) for 90 s. Each day after the first and last erosive challenges, the specimens were subjected to the abrasive challenge for 15 s, using a toothbrushing machine (Biopdi, São Carlos, SP, Brazil), soft toothbrushes and slurry (1:3 g/ml) of the tested toothpastes (1.5 N). The specimens were kept in artificial saliva between the challenges. The final profile was obtained and the ETW (µm) was calculated. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (p<0.05). Results All dentifrices tested significantly reduced the enamel wear in comparison with the Placebo, except GIII. The median (95% CI) ETW was 1.35 (1.25-1.46)bc for GI, 1.17 (1.01-1.34)cd for GII, 1.36 (1.28-1.45)ab for GIII, 1.08 (1.04-1.14)d for GIV and 2.28 (2.18-2.39)a for GV. Conclusion When dentifrices from the same manufacturer were compared, the whitening dentifrices led to similar or less wear than the regular ones.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Erosion/chemically induced , Toothpastes/adverse effects , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Toothbrushing/adverse effects , Toothpastes/chemistry , Materials Testing , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180453, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012522

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study was designed for the chemical activation of a 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching gel to increase its whitening effectiveness and reduce its toxicity. Methodology First, the bleaching gel - associated or not with ferrous sulfate (FS), manganese chloride (MC), peroxidase (PR), or catalase (CT) - was applied (3x 15 min) to enamel/dentin discs adapted to artificial pulp chambers. Then, odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells were exposed for 1 h to the extracts (culture medium + components released from the product), for the assessment of viability (MTT assay) and oxidative stress (H2DCFDA). Residual H2O2 and bleaching effectiveness (DE) were also evaluated. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA complemented with Tukey's test (n=8. p<0.05). Results All chemically activated groups minimized MDPC-23 oxidative stress generation; however, significantly higher cell viability was detected for MC, PR, and CT than for plain 35% H2O2 gel. Nevertheless, FS, MC, PR, and CT reduced the amount of residual H2O2 and increased bleaching effectiveness. Conclusion Chemical activation of 35% H2O2 gel with MC, PR, and CT minimized residual H2O2 and pulp cell toxicity; but PR duplicated the whitening potential of the bleaching gel after a single 45-minute session.


Subject(s)
Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Bleaching Agents/toxicity , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Reference Values , Time Factors , Ferrous Compounds/chemistry , Catalase/chemistry , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Chlorides/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Manganese Compounds/chemistry , Color , Peroxidase/chemistry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/chemistry , Dental Pulp/diagnostic imaging , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/chemistry , Odontoblasts/drug effects
5.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180233, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975899

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To analyze color change, microhardness and chemical composition of enamel bleached with in-office bleaching agent with different desensitizing application protocols. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventeen polished anterior human enamel surfaces were obtained and randomly divided into nine groups (n = 13). After recording initial color, microhardness and chemical composition, the bleaching treatments were performed as G1: Signal Professional White Now POWDER&LIQUID FAST 38% Hydrogen peroxide(S); G2: S+Flor Opal/0.5% fluoride ion(F); G3: S+GC Tooth Mousse/Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste(TM); G4: S+UltraEZ/3% potassium nitrate&0.11% fluoride(U); G5: S+Signal Professional SENSITIVE PHASE 1/30% Nano-Hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) suspension(SP); G6: S-F mixture; G7: S-TM mixture; G8: S-U mixture; G9: S-SP mixture. Color, microhardness and chemical composition measurements were repeated after 1 and 14 days. The percentage of microhardness loss (PML) was calculated 1 and 14 days after bleaching. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Welch ANOVA, Tukey and Dunnett T3 tests (p<0.05). Results: Color change was observed in all groups. The highest ΔE was observed at G7 after 1 day, and ΔE at G8 was the highest after 14 days (p<0.05). A decrease in microhardness was observed in all groups except G6 and G7 after 1 day. The microhardness of all groups increased after 14 days in comparison with 1 day after bleaching (p>0.05). PML was observed in all groups except G6 and G7 after bleaching and none of the groups showed PML after 14 days. No significant changes were observed after bleaching at Ca and P levels and Ca/P ratios at 1 or 14 days after bleaching (p>0.05). F mass increased only in G2 and G6, 1 day after bleaching (p<0.05). Conclusions: The use of desensitizing agents containing fluoride, CPP-ACP, potassium nitrate or n-HAP after in-office bleaching or mixed in bleaching agent did not inhibit the bleaching effect. However, they all recovered microhardness of enamel 14 days after in-office bleaching.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dentin Desensitizing Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Reference Values , Saliva, Artificial/chemistry , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Spectrophotometry , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Calcium Phosphates/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Caseins/chemistry , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Potassium Compounds/chemistry , Color , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Hardness Tests , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Nitrates/chemistry
6.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180051, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975887

ABSTRACT

Abstract The efficacy of whitening toothpastes is questionable and controversial. Clinicians, patients and researchers have expressed concern with whitening toothpastes due to the risk of wearing the dental structure and the potential for disappointment if the advertised cosmetic results are not achieved. Objective: This study compared the whitening performance of toothpastes with different whitening technologies after initial and continued use. Material and Methods: Ninety bovine incisors were stained using a concentrated solution of black tea. They were randomly distributed into 6 groups, according to the toothpaste whitening technology: activated charcoal (B&W), blue covarine (WAD), hydrogen peroxide (LWA), microbeads (Oral B 3D White Perfection - 3DW) and optimized abrasives (XW4D). They were compared to a traditional toothpaste without a whitening agent (TA - control). Specimens underwent a brushing machine with controlled pressure, time and temperature. A calibrated examiner measured the color using a VITA-Classical scale before the first brushing cycle (T0), after the first brushing cycle (TI), and after a brushing cycle that simulates continuous use (TCU). Whitening performance was evaluated by the difference of shades (ΔSGU) between T0-TI and T0-TCU timepoints, using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's non-parametric test. The Wilcoxon test was used to evaluate the cumulative effect (α=0.05). Results: Statistically significant differences were observed between toothpastes in both TI and TCU (p<0.05). The time of use also had a significant effect (p<0.05). Conclusion: Only WAD and 3DW showed whitening performance after the first use (TI). The greatest whitening performance after continuous use was obtained by WAD, followed by LWA and 3DW. The use of conventional toothpaste (TA) promotes no tooth whitening. Clinical relevance: Microbead abrasives (3DW) and blue covarine (WAD) were the active technology tested that presented the best global tooth whitening performance.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Charcoal/chemistry , Isoindoles/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Metalloporphyrins/chemistry , Microspheres , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Tooth/drug effects , Toothbrushing/methods , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results
7.
Int. j. odontostomatol. (Print) ; 12(4): 416-422, dic. 2018. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-975767

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN: El resultado del tratamiento de blanqueamiento dental puede verse afectado en pacientes que consumen bebidas pigmentantes durante el tratamiento. El objetivo de este trabajo consistió en valuar el efecto in vitro de la exposición al extracto de maíz morado (chicha morada) sobre el color del esmalte humano, durante y después del tratamiento del blanqueamiento dental con peróxido de hidrógeno al 35 %. Se utilizaron 48 dientes humanos, divididos en grupos según la bebida a la que se expuso: Extracto de maíz morado peruano (MM), té verde (T) y agua destilada (A); la mitad de los especímenes expuestos a cada bebida fueron sometidos a blanqueamiento dental con peróxido de hidrógeno al 35 % durante los primeros días de exposición a la pigmentación, resultando en los siguientes grupos: Grupo A: Sin blanqueamiento + maíz morado, Grupo B: Sin blanqueamiento + té verde, Grupo C: Sin blanqueamiento + agua destilada, Grupo D: Con blanqueamiento + maíz morado, Grupo E: Con blanqueamiento + té verde, Grupo F: Con blanqueamiento + agua destilada. Los cambios de color se midieron con un espectrofotómetro digital (VITA Easyshade Advance 4.0, VITA, Alemania) antes del blanqueamiento, durante el blanqueamiento, finalizado el blanqueamiento y al final de los 36 días de exposición a los pigmentos. Según el ∆E, el extracto de maíz morado difiere significativamente con el agua destilada (p < 0,05). Con respecto al grado de luminosidad, el extracto de maíz morado con blanqueamiento presentó los menores valores de luminosidad (p < 0,05). En cuanto al croma, no hubo diferencias entre los grupos (p > 0,05). La exposición al extracto de maíz morado pigmenta los dientes, durante el blanqueamiento el extracto de maíz morado no afecta el tratamiento, pero si la exposición continúa luego del blanqueamiento dental, el color de los dientes se verá afectado.


ABSTRACT: The result of tooth whitening treatment may be affected in patients who consume staining drinks during treatment. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro effect of the exposure to purple corn extract (chicha morada) on human enamel color, during and after the treatment of teeth whitening with 35 % hydrogen peroxide. Forty-eight human teeth were used, divided into groups according to the drink to which it was exposed: Peruvian purple corn extract (MM), green tea (T) and distilled water (A); half of the specimens exposed to each drink were subjected to tooth whitening with 35 % hydrogen peroxide during the first days of exposure to pigmentation, resulting in the following groups: Group A: Without bleaching + purple corn, Group B: Without whitening + green tea, Group C: No whitening + distilled water, Group D: With whitening + purple corn, Group E: With whitening + green tea, Group F: With whitening + distilled water. The color changes were measured with a digital spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade Advance 4.0, VITA, Germany) before bleaching, during whitening, after whitening and at the end of 36 days of exposure to pigments. According to the ∆E, the purple corn extract differs significantly with the distilled water (p <0.05). Regarding the degree of luminosity, the purple corn extract with whitening presented the lowest luminosity values (p <0.05). As for the chroma, there were no differences between the groups (p> 0.05). Exposure to purple corn extract pigments the teeth, during whitening the purple corn extract does not affect the treatment, but if the exposure continues after tooth whitening, the color of the teeth will be affected.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pigments, Biological/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Zea mays/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Beverages , In Vitro Techniques , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Color , Hydrogen Peroxide
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170589, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954496

ABSTRACT

Abstract High concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can cause adverse effects on composition and structure of teeth. However, the addition of calcium and fluoride in bleaching agents may reduce enamel demineralization. Objective: To evaluate chemical changes of sound and demineralized enamels submitted to high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide containing fluoride (F) or calcium (Ca). Material and Methods: Enamel blocks of bovine incisors with standard dimensions were obtained and half of them were submitted to pH-cycling to promote initial enamel caries lesions. Sound and demineralized enamel samples were divided into (n=10): (C) Control (no whitening treatment); (HP) 35% hydrogen peroxide; and two experimental groups: (HPF) 35% HP+0.2% F and (HPC) 35% HP+0.2% Ca. Experimental groups were submitted to two in-office bleaching sessions and agents were applied 3 times for 15 min to each session. The control group was kept in remineralizing solution at 37°C during the bleaching treatment. The surface mineral content of sound and demineralized enamels was determined through Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), Energy dispersive Micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μ-EDXRF); and the subsurface, through cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH). In addition, polarized light microscopy (PLM) images of enamel subsurface were observed. Results: According to three-way (FT-Raman and μ-EDXRF analyses) or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (CSMH) and Tukey test (α=5%), the calcium or fluoride added to high-concentrated bleaching agents increased phosphate and carbonate concentrations on sound and demineralized enamels (p<0.05). However, HPC and HPF were unable to completely reverse the subsurface mineral loss promoted by bleaching on sound and demineralized enamels. The calcium/ phosphate (Ca/P) ratio of sound enamel decreased after HP treatment (p<0.001). Conclusion: Even though experimental bleaching agents with Ca or F reduced mineral loss for both sound and demineralized enamel surfaces, these agents were unable to reverse the enamel subsurface demineralization.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Calcium/chemistry , Tooth Demineralization/chemically induced , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Fluorides/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Phosphates/chemistry , Reference Values , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Materials Testing , Carbonates/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Hardness Tests , Microscopy, Polarization
9.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20160460, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893725

ABSTRACT

Abstract Besides the effects on the health of individuals, cigarette smoking can also interfere with the appearance of their teeth. Objective: To evaluate the effect of cigarette smoking-toothbrushing-cycling (CSTC) with whitening toothpastes on the roughness and optical behavior of bovine enamel for eight weeks. Material and Methods: Thirty bovine dentin/enamel discs, 8.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm thick, were randomly divided into three groups according to the toothpastes: whitening (Colgate Luminous White - CW and Oral B 3D White - OW), and a non-whitening (Colgate - C). The roughness, color (CIE L*a*b* system), translucency and gloss were measured before and after the specimens were submitted to CSTC. The topography of the specimens was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. During the first week, the specimens were daily subjected to the consumption of 20 cigarettes and brushed (40 strokes/100 g) with the toothpastes' slurries. Thereafter, the CSTC was weekly applied in an accumulated model (140 cigarettes/280 strokes) for seven weeks. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD test, and paired-t test (α=0.05). Results: The three toothpastes produced significant changes in roughness, color, translucency and gloss (p<0.05). After eight weeks, the roughness and the gloss produced by the three toothpastes were similar (p>0.05), while OW produced the lowest color change and the translucency of C was lower than that of CW (p<0.05). The three toothpastes produced a significant decrease in L* values and a significant increase in a* values after eight weeks (p<0.05). No significant difference in the b* coordinate was found for OW (p=0.13) There were topographic changes in the enamel surfaces. Conclusions: The whitening toothpastes increased the roughness, changed the topography and were not able to maintain the optical stability of enamel exposed over eight weeks.


Subject(s)
Animals , Pregnancy , Surface Properties/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Materials Testing , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dentifrices/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Time Factors , Toothbrushing/methods , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Smoking/adverse effects , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Color , Dental Enamel/chemistry
10.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(2): 234-242, Mar.-Apr. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-841184

ABSTRACT

Abstract Regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) has been proposed as a new approach to treat immature permanent teeth. However, materials used in REP for root canal disinfection or cervical sealing may induce tooth discoloration. Objectives To assess tooth crown’s color after intracanal treatment with triple antibiotic paste (TAP) or calcium hydroxide (CH); cervical sealing with glass ionomer cement (GIC) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA); and bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Material and Methods After pulp removal and color spectrophotometer measurement, 50 bovine incisors were divided into 4 experimental groups and one control (untreated). Experiments were performed in phases (Ph). Ph1: TAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, minocycline), TAPM (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, amoxicillin), DAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole), or CH treatment groups. After 1 and 3 days (d); 1, 2, 3 weeks (w); and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months (m), color was measured and medications were removed. Ph2: GIC or MTA cervical sealing, each using half of the specimens from each group. Color was assessed after 1d, 3d; 1w, 2w, 3w; 1m and 2m. Ph3: Two bleaching sessions, each followed by color measurement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc Holm-Sidak method. Results Ph1: Specimens of TAP group presented higher color alteration (ΔE) mean than those of TAPM group. No significant difference was found among TAP or TAPM and CH, DAP or Control groups. Ph2: cervical sealing materials showed no influence on color alteration. Ph3: Different ΔE means (from different groups), prior to bleaching, became equivalent after one bleaching session. Conclusions TAP induces higher color alteration than TAPM; color alteration increases over time; cervical sealing material has no influence on color alteration; and, dental bleaching was able to recover, at least partially, the tooth crown’s color.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Root Canal Therapy/methods , Tooth Discoloration/chemically induced , Tooth Crown/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Oxides/chemistry , Peroxides/chemistry , Reference Values , Spectrophotometry , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Urea/chemistry , Materials Testing , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Silicates/chemistry , Prosthesis Coloring , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Drug Combinations , Glass Ionomer Cements/chemistry
11.
Bauru; s.n; 2017. 131 p. tab, ilus, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-880413

ABSTRACT

Introdução: A alteração de cor dos dentes apresenta-se como um dos fatores que mais concorrem para o desequilíbrio do sorriso, sendo o clareamento dental amplamente difundido e solicitado pelos pacientes. Objetivo: Este estudo in situ teve como objetivo avaliar as mudanças morfológicas e químicas do esmalte quando submetido a três agentes clareadores à base de peróxido de hidrogênio ativados com fonte de luz híbrida e um agente placebo (gel sem peróxido de hidrogênio), por meio do uso da espectrometria de energia dispersiva de raios-X (EDS). Metodologia: Fragmentos de terceiros molares humanos foram divididos em quatro grupos (n=12), para a realização de uma sessão de clareamento com cinco aplicações de oito minutos dos géis clareadores: Placebo (Plac); Lase Peroxide Flex 35% e 15% (DMC) (LPF35LH e LPF15LH); Gel experimental a 10% (DMC) (EXP10LHV), e foram fotocatalizados com luz híbrida: LED azul/laser de diodo (LH) (Whitening Lase II, DMC) ou LED violeta/laser de diodo (LHV) (luz experimental, DMC). Após o clareamento, os espécimes foram fixados a dispositivos intraorais usados pelos participantes durante 15 dias. A composição inorgânica e topografia da superfície de esmalte foram analisadas antes e após o clareamento, e depois de 3, 7 e 15 dias de exposição à saliva. Os valores elementares da composição foram analisados por ANOVA a um critério de medidas repetidas e teste de Tukey. Para a topografia os escores foram determinados por três examinadores previamente calibrados pelo teste Kappa e foi aplicado o teste estatístico de Friedman e Kruskal-Wallis, e as comparações individuais foram realizadas pelo teste de Dunn ( = 0,05). Resultados: De maneira geral, não houve alterações significativas na porcentagem elementar do esmalte nos diferentes períodos estudados. Ao analisar os dois principais elementos, o grupo LPF35HL obteve o menor valor de cálcio (Ca), possuindo diferença estatisticamente significante quando comparado com o grupo EXP10LHV, enquanto os valores de fosfato (P) permaneceram constantes. Morfologicamente somente o grupo EXP10LHV demostrou maior planificação da superfície quando comparado o período de 7 dias com 15 dias. Conclusão: Os diferentes protocolos clareadores empregados, demonstraram alterações pontuais na variação dos elementos químicos e na morfologia do esmalte dental ao longo do período de avaliação.(AU)


Introduction: The tooth color change is one of the factors that contributes most to the smile imbalance, and dental bleaching is widely diffused and requested by the patients. Objective: The aimed of this in situ study is to evaluate the morphological and chemical changes of the enamel when submitted to three activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents with hybrid light source and a placebo agent (gel without hydrogen peroxide), using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Methodology: Fragments of human third molars were divided into four groups (n = 12) to perform a bleaching session with five eight minute applications of bleaching gels: Placebo (Plac); Lase Peroxide Flex 35% and 15% (DMC) (LPF35LH and LPF15LH); 10% experimental gel (DMC) (EXP10LHV), and photocatalyzed with hybrid light: blue LED / diode laser (LH) (Whitening Lase II, DMC) or violet LED / diode laser (LHV). After bleaching, the specimens were fixed to intraoral devices used by participants for 15 days. The inorganic composition and topography of the enamel surface were analyzed before and after bleaching, and after 3, 7 and 15 days of exposure to saliva. The elementary values of the composition were analyzed by one-way ANOVA at a repeated measures and Tukey's test. For the topography the scores were determined by three examiners previously calibrated by the Kappa test and the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis statistical test were applied, and the individual comparisons were performed by the Dunn test ( = 0.05). Results: In general, there were no significant changes in the elemental percentage of enamel in the different periods studied. When analyzing the two main elements, the LPF35HL group had the lowest calcium (Ca) value, which had a statistically significant difference when compared to the EXP10LHV group, while the phosphate (P) values remained constant. Morphologically, only the EXP10LHV group showed greater surface planning when compared to the period of 7 days with 15 days. Conclusion: The different bleaching protocols employed showed specific alterations in the variation of the chemical elements and the morphology of the dental enamel during the evaluation period.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Analysis of Variance , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Microscopy, Electrochemical, Scanning , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Titanium/chemistry
12.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(1): 24-30, Jan.-Feb. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-777364

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Acid Etching, Dental/methods , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Wear/chemically induced , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Toothbrushing , Materials Testing , Random Allocation , Analysis of Variance , Gels , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
13.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e69, 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952012

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C)). The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10): G2 (CR), consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR), consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR), which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR), which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05). G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05). No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Tooth Fractures/prevention & control , Vitamins/chemistry , Tooth, Nonvital/drug therapy , alpha-Tocopherol/chemistry , Dental Restoration, Permanent/adverse effects , Ascorbic Acid/chemistry , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Composite Resins/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Gels , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
14.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e33, 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951972

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Dentifrices/chemistry , Isoindoles/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Metalloporphyrins/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties/radiation effects , Time Factors , Toothbrushing , Random Allocation , Single-Blind Method , Color , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
15.
Bauru; s.n; 2016. 106 p. tab, ilus, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-881838

ABSTRACT

Este estudo in vitro avaliou a influência do tempo de aplicação do bicarbonato de sódio a 10% na qualidade da união de um sistema adesivo universal unido ao esmalte bovino clareado por meio de testes de resistência de união (microtração imediata e após 6 meses) e grau de conversão na interface adesiva (espectroscopia micro-Raman). Cento e dez blocos de esmalte bovino (4x4 mm) foram planificados e distribuídos aleatoriamente em 5 grupos: C: controle, sem clareamento; B: clareamento com peróxido de hidrogênio 35% (HP); BS3: clareamento com HP seguido de tratamento com a solução de bicarbonato de sódio 10% (BS) por 3 min; BS5: clareamento com HP seguido de tratamento com BS por 5 min; BS10: clareamento com HP seguido de tratamento com BS por 10 min. O HP foi aplicado duas vezes (20 minutos cada, com exceção do grupo C) e em seguida as restaurações adesivas foram realizadas. Após 24 horas, 20 espécimes de cada grupo foram seccionados em palitos (1x1 mm) e submetidos ao teste de resistência de união (imediato e após 6 meses) em máquina de ensaios universal com velocidade de 0,5 mm/min (n=10). Os dados foram analisados por ANOVA a dois critérios (p <0,05). As médias das análises imediata e após 6 meses foram: C: 26,77 / 25,32; B: 26,42 / 26,42; BS3: 23,95 / 22,98; BS5: 23,65 / 26,64; BS10: 23,42 / 29,30. Nenhum dos fatores testados apresentou significância: tratamento (p=0,349) e tempo (p=0,234), não havendo interação entre estes (p=0,198). Falhas adesivas foram predominantes nos dois períodos de avaliação. Para a análise do grau de conversão, após 24 horas da restauração, 2 espécimes de cada grupo foram seccionados em fatias de 1mm, sendo apenas 3 fatias selecionadas. Os seguintes parâmetros foram utilizados: excitação dos espécimes com laser de argônio operando a 538 nm, espectro obtido a uma resolução ~4cm-1, sob uma região de espectro entre 1580-1660cm-1, verificando a altura dos picos 1608cm-1 e 1637cm-1. Os dados foram analisados por ANOVA a um critério (p <0,05) e as médias do grau de conversão foram: C: 71,10%; B: 72,11%; BS3: 73,98%; BS5: 69,25%; BS10: 70,56%. O fator de estudo tratamento não apresentou significância estatística (p=0,808). A adesão no esmalte clareado parece não ter sido afetada negativamente quando restaurações adesivas foram feitas imediatamente após o clareamento, independente da aplicação ou não da substância antioxidante. Mais estudos que avaliem a adesão em esmalte clareado, principalmente no que diz respeito ao grau de conversão e aos diferentes tipos de sistemas adesivos universais se fazem necessários para fins comparativos e para que possamos indicar seguramente as restaurações imediatas (quando necessárias) na prática clínica.(AU)


The present in vitro study evaluated the influence of the application time of 10% sodium bicarbonate in the adhesion quality of a universal adhesive system bonded to bleached enamel through microtensile bond strength testing (immediate and after 6 months) and the degree conversion (micro-Raman spectroscopy). One hundred and ten bovine enamel blocks (4x4mm) were flattened and randomly allocated into 5 groups: C: control, without bleaching; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP); BS3: bleached and treated with 10% sodium bicarbonate solution (BS) for 3 min; BS5: bleached and treated with BS for 5 min; BS10: bleached and treated with BS for 10 min. HP was applied twice (20 minutes each, except in group C) and the adhesive restorations were performed. After 24 hours, 20 specimens from each group were sectioned into sticks (1x1 mm) and submitted to microtensile bond strength testing (immediately and after 6 months) in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (n = 10). Data was analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p <0.05). The means of the immediate and 6 months analysis were: C 26.77 / 25.32; B: 26.42 / 26.42; BS3: 23.95 / 22.98; BS5: 23.65 / 26.64; BS10: 23.42 / 29.30. None of the tested factors showed significance: treatment (p = 0.349) and time (p = 0.234), with no interaction between them (p = 0.198). Adhesive failures were predominant in both evaluation periods. For the degree of conversion analysis, 2 specimens of each group were sectioned into 1 mm slices after 24 hours of the restorative procedure, and 3 slices were selected. The following parameters were used: excitation of specimens with argon laser operating at 538 nm, spectrum obtained at a resolution of ~4cm-1, under a spectrum region between 1580-1660cm-1, evaluating the height of the peaks at 1608cm-1 and 1637cm-1. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA (p <0.05). The means of degree of conversion were: C: 71.10%; B: 72.11%; BS3: 73.98%; BS5: 69.25%; BS10: 70.56%. The study factor "treatment" was not statistically significant (p = 0.808). The results of bonding to bleached enamel was not negatively affected when adhesive restorations were made immediately after bleaching, regardless of the application of the antioxidant substance. Further studies to evaluate the adhesion on bleached enamel, mainly with regard to the degree of conversion and different types of universal adhesive systems are needed for comparative purposes. Only after this, the immediate restoration (if necessary) in clinical practice can be safely and indicated.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Sodium Bicarbonate/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Materials Testing , Phosphoric Acids/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Resin Cements/chemistry , Spectrum Analysis, Raman/methods , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Time Factors
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 23(6): 609-613, Nov.-Dec. 2015. tab
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-769821

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.


Subject(s)
Humans , Isoindoles/chemistry , Metalloporphyrins/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Analysis of Variance , Color , Colorimetry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Peroxides/chemistry , Reference Values , Reproducibility of Results , Single-Blind Method , Spectrophotometry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Time Factors , Toothbrushing , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Urea/chemistry
17.
Braz. dent. j ; 26(2): 135-140, Mar-Apr/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-741208

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the demineralization and hydrogen peroxide (HP) penetration in teeth with incipient lesions submitted to bleaching treatment. For analysis of HP penetration, sound and demineralized enamel/dentin discs were placed in artificial pulp chambers containing acetate buffer solution. After bleaching treatment, this solution was subjected for analysis of optical density by spectrophotometry and the disc surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The remaining discs were subjected for cross-sectional hardness analysis at different depths. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and PLSD Fisher test (a=0.05). It was observed that previously demineralized teeth showed greater HP penetration (p<0.05). The bleaching treatment caused changes to a depth of 20 µm in sound enamel and up to 90 µm in demineralized enamel. SEM and PLM images revealed that the bleaching treatment caused superficial changes that were considerably more accentuated in previously demineralized teeth. It may be concluded that the enamel mineralization level influences HP penetration and the bleaching agent contributed to increase the demineralization depth.


O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a desmineralização e a penetração do peróxido de hidrogênio (HP) em dentes com lesões incipientes submetidos ao tratamento clareador. Para analisar a penetração do peróxido de hidrogênio, discos de esmalte/dentina hígidos e desmineralizados foram posicionados em câmaras pulpares artificiais contendo solução tampão de acetato. Após o tratamento clareador, esta solução foi submetida à análise da densidade óptica no espectrofotômetro e as superfícies dos discos foram analisadas por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV) e microscopia de luz polarizada (MLP). Os discos restantes foram submetidos à análise de microdureza transversal em diferentes profundidades. Os dados foram submetidos aos testes ANOVA e teste PLSD Fisher (= 5%). Observou-se que os dentes previamente desmineralizados mostraram maior penetração de HP (p<0,05). O tratamento clareador causou alterações em uma profundidade de 20 μm em esmalte hígido e até 90 μm em esmalte desmineralizado. As imagens obtidas em PLM e MEV mostraram que o tratamento clareador promove alterações superficiais no esmalte, sendo mais pronunciadas em dentes previamente desmineralizados. Foi concluído que o nível de mineralização do esmalte influencia a penetração do PH e que o agente clareador contribuiu para o aumento da profundidade de desmineralização.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dentin Permeability/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Demineralization , Dental Pulp Cavity , Hardness , In Vitro Techniques , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
18.
Bauru; s.n; 2015. 126 p. ilus, tab, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-867749

ABSTRACT

O objetivo deste estudo in vivo, internacional, randomizado e duplo cedo foiavaliar comparativamente a efetividade e o pH de diferentes géis clareadores natécnica de clareamento em consultório, com e sem o emprego de fonte de luzhíbrida em função do grau de alteração de cor, sensibilidade e manutenção dotratamento ao longo de 12 meses de acompanhamento. Foram selecionados 48voluntários de acordo com os critérios de inclusão e exclusão. Os pacientes foramdivididos, de forma randomizada, em 4 grupos de 12 participantes cada, onde:Grupo EXP10 –5 aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio a 10% (GelExperimental – DMC Equipamentos) e ativação de luz híbrida de LED (violeta)/Laser(Experimental – DMC Equipamentos) com 7’ e 30” por aplicação, com tempo total de37’30; Grupo LP15 – 5 aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio 15% (LasePeroxide Lite – DMC Equipamentos) seguindo mesmo protocolo do grupo EXP10;Grupo TB35LH – 3 aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio a 35% (Total BlancOffice - DFL) e ativação de luz híbrida de LED (azul)/Laser (Whitening Lase II – DMCEquipamentos) de 7’ e 30” por aplicação, com tempo total de 22’30”; Grupo TB35 – 3aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio a 35% (Total Blanc Office - DFL) semativação com fonte de luz, totalizando 45”. A determinação dos valores de pH foirealizada com o peagômetro digital (Sentron Model 1001, Sentron) nos temposinicial e após o término do protocolo clareador. A aferição da cor foi feita comespectofotômetro VITA Easyshade antes do clareamento, após 24 horas, 1 semana,1, 6 e 12 meses. A sensibilidade dentária e grau de satisfação dos pacientes foramavaliados por meio do questionário VAS e IPS antes, imediatamente após oclareamento, 24 horas e uma semana após. Os resultados da alteração do pHreceberam tratamento estatístico pela ANOVA e teste de Bonferroni a 0,05%...


The aim of the present in vivo study, international, randomized and doubleearly was to comparatively evaluate the effectiveness and pH of different bleachingagents for in office bleaching techniques, with and without the use of a hybrid lightsource depending on the degree of color change, sensitivity and maintenancetreatment over a 12-month follow-up. Selected were 48 volunteers according to theinclusion and exclusion criteria. The patients were randomly divided into 4 groups of12 participants each, where: EXP Group10- 5 applications of 10% hydrogen peroxidegel (Experimental Gel - Equipment DMC) and activation of hybrid LED light (violet) /Laser (Experimental - Equipment DMC) with 7 "and 30" per application, with a totaltime of 37'30; LP15 Group- 5 applications of 15% hydrogen peroxide gel (LasePeroxide Lite - Equipment DMC) following the same protocol of the EXP10 Group;TB35LH Group- 3 applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (of Blanc Office - DFL)and activation of hybrid LED light (blue) / Laser (Whitening Lase II - DMC Equipment)7 "and 30" per application, with a total time of 22'30; TB35 Group - 3 applications of35% hydrogen peroxide gel (of Blanc Office - DFL) without light activation, totaling45 ". The determination of pH was carried out with a digital pH meter (Sentron Model1001, Sentron) in the initial times and after the bleaching protocol. The colormeasurement was made with a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer before thetreatment, after 24 hours, 1 week, 1, 6 and 12 months. Tooth sensitivity and degreeof patient satisfaction were assessed by the VAS IPS questionnaire before,immediately after bleaching, 24 hours and one week after. The pH change resultswere statistically processed by the ANOVA and Bonferroni tests at 0.05%...


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Analysis of Variance , Dentin Sensitivity , Gels , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
19.
Bauru; s.n; 2015. 126 p. ilus, tab, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-871407

ABSTRACT

O objetivo deste estudo in vivo, internacional, randomizado e duplo cedo foiavaliar comparativamente a efetividade e o pH de diferentes géis clareadores natécnica de clareamento em consultório, com e sem o emprego de fonte de luzhíbrida em função do grau de alteração de cor, sensibilidade e manutenção dotratamento ao longo de 12 meses de acompanhamento. Foram selecionados 48voluntários de acordo com os critérios de inclusão e exclusão. Os pacientes foramdivididos, de forma randomizada, em 4 grupos de 12 participantes cada, onde:Grupo EXP10 –5 aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio a 10% (GelExperimental – DMC Equipamentos) e ativação de luz híbrida de LED (violeta)/Laser(Experimental – DMC Equipamentos) com 7’ e 30” por aplicação, com tempo total de37’30; Grupo LP15 – 5 aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio 15% (LasePeroxide Lite – DMC Equipamentos) seguindo mesmo protocolo do grupo EXP10;Grupo TB35LH – 3 aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio a 35% (Total BlancOffice - DFL) e ativação de luz híbrida de LED (azul)/Laser (Whitening Lase II – DMCEquipamentos) de 7’ e 30” por aplicação, com tempo total de 22’30”; Grupo TB35 – 3aplicações do gel de peróxido de hidrogênio a 35% (Total Blanc Office - DFL) semativação com fonte de luz, totalizando 45”. A determinação dos valores de pH foirealizada com o peagômetro digital (Sentron Model 1001, Sentron) nos temposinicial e após o término do protocolo clareador. A aferição da cor foi feita comespectofotômetro VITA Easyshade antes do clareamento, após 24 horas, 1 semana,1, 6 e 12 meses. A sensibilidade dentária e grau de satisfação dos pacientes foramavaliados por meio do questionário VAS e IPS antes, imediatamente após oclareamento, 24 horas e uma semana após. Os resultados da alteração do pHreceberam tratamento estatístico pela ANOVA e teste de Bonferroni a 0,05%...


The aim of the present in vivo study, international, randomized and doubleearly was to comparatively evaluate the effectiveness and pH of different bleachingagents for in office bleaching techniques, with and without the use of a hybrid lightsource depending on the degree of color change, sensitivity and maintenancetreatment over a 12-month follow-up. Selected were 48 volunteers according to theinclusion and exclusion criteria. The patients were randomly divided into 4 groups of12 participants each, where: EXP Group10- 5 applications of 10% hydrogen peroxidegel (Experimental Gel - Equipment DMC) and activation of hybrid LED light (violet) /Laser (Experimental - Equipment DMC) with 7 "and 30" per application, with a totaltime of 37'30; LP15 Group- 5 applications of 15% hydrogen peroxide gel (LasePeroxide Lite - Equipment DMC) following the same protocol of the EXP10 Group;TB35LH Group- 3 applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (of Blanc Office - DFL)and activation of hybrid LED light (blue) / Laser (Whitening Lase II - DMC Equipment)7 "and 30" per application, with a total time of 22'30; TB35 Group - 3 applications of35% hydrogen peroxide gel (of Blanc Office - DFL) without light activation, totaling45 ". The determination of pH was carried out with a digital pH meter (Sentron Model1001, Sentron) in the initial times and after the bleaching protocol. The colormeasurement was made with a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer before thetreatment, after 24 hours, 1 week, 1, 6 and 12 months. Tooth sensitivity and degreeof patient satisfaction were assessed by the VAS IPS questionnaire before,immediately after bleaching, 24 hours and one week after. The pH change resultswere statistically processed by the ANOVA and Bonferroni tests at 0.05%...


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Analysis of Variance , Dentin Sensitivity , Gels , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
20.
J. appl. oral sci ; 22(6): 534-540, Nov-Dec/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-732591

ABSTRACT

There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. .


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Carbonated Beverages , Coffee/chemistry , Cola/chemistry , Pigmentation/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth/drug effects , Analysis of Variance , Color , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Reference Values , Spectrophotometry , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Discoloration
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