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3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762478

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Breast , Genetic Testing
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762477

ABSTRACT

Biological drugs, such as proteins and immunogens, are increasingly used to treat various diseases, including tumors and autoimmune diseases, and biological molecules have almost completely replaced synthetic drugs in rheumatology. Although biological treatments such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs seem to be quite safe, they cause some undesirable effects, such as the onset of infections due to weakening of the immune system. Given the biological nature of these drugs, they might be recognized as extraneous; this would induce an immune reaction that neutralizes their effectiveness or lead to more serious consequences. Laboratories play a pivotal role in appropriate therapeutic management. The aim of this review was to underline the production of anti-drug antibodies during treatment with biological drugs and highlight the role of laboratories in ensuring appropriate use of these drugs.


Subject(s)
Antibodies , Autoimmune Diseases , Biological Therapy , Immune System , Necrosis , Rheumatology
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762476

ABSTRACT

Hereditary breast cancer is known for its strong tendency of inheritance. Most hereditary breast cancers are related to BRCA1/BRCA2 pathogenic variants. The lifelong risk of breast cancer in pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant carriers is approximately 65% and 45%, respectively, whereas that of ovarian cancer is estimated to be 39% and 11%, respectively. Therefore, understanding these variants and clinical knowledge on their occurrence in breast cancers and carriers are important. BRCA1 pathogenic variant breast cancer shows more aggressive clinicopathological features than the BRCA2 pathogenic variant breast cancer. Compared with sporadic breast cancer, their prognosis is still debated. Treatments of BRCA1/BRCA2 pathogenic variant breast cancer are similar to those for BRCA-negative breast cancer, mainly including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recently, various clinical trials have investigated poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor treatment for advanced-stage BRCA1/BRCA2 pathogenic variant breast cancer. Among the various PARP inhibitors, olaparib and talazoparib, which reached phase III clinical trials, showed improvement of median progression-free survival around three months. Preventive and surveillance strategies for BRCA pathogenic variant breast cancer to reduce cancer recurrence and improve treatment outcomes have recently received increasing attention. In this review, we provide an information on the clinical features of BRCA1/BRCA2 pathogenic variant breast cancer and clinical recommendations for BRCA pathogenic variant carriers, with a focus on treatment and prevention strategies. With this knowledge, clinicians could manage the BRCA1/BRCA2 pathogenic variant breast cancer patients more effectively.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Breast , Disease-Free Survival , Drug Therapy , Humans , Ovarian Neoplasms , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors , Prognosis , Radiotherapy , Recurrence , Wills
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Automated cellular analyzers are expected to improve the analytical performance in body fluid (BF) analysis. We evaluated the analytical performance of three automated cellular analyzers and established optimum reflex analysis guidelines. METHODS: A total of 542 BF samples (88 cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] samples and 454 non-CSF samples) were examined using manual counting and three automated cellular analyzers: UniCel DxH 800 (Beckman Coulter), XN-350 (Sysmex), and UF-5000 (Sysmex). Additionally, 2,779 BF analysis results were retrospectively reviewed. For malignant cell analysis, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used, and the detection of high fluorescence-BF cells (HF-BFs) using the XN-350 analyzer was compared with cytology results. RESULTS: All three analyzers showed good agreement for total nucleated cell (TNC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, except for the RBC count in CSF samples using the UniCel DxH 800. However, variable degrees of differences were observed during differential cell counting. For malignant cell analysis, the area under the curve was 0.63 for the XN-350 analyzer and 0.76 for manual counting. We established our own reflex analysis guidelines as follows: HF-BFs 83.4/100 WBCs or eosinophils >3.8% are the criteria for mandatory double check confirmation with 1,000× magnification examination. CONCLUSIONS: The three automated analyzers showed good analytical performances. Application of reflex analysis guidelines is recommended for eosinophils and HF-BFs, and manual confirmation is warranted.


Subject(s)
Body Fluids , Cell Count , Cerebrospinal Fluid , Eosinophils , Erythrocytes , Leukocytes , Reflex , Retrospective Studies , ROC Curve
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762474

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ability of urinary biomarkers to complement established clinical risk prediction models for postoperative adverse kidney events is unclear. We assessed the effect of urinary biomarkers linked to suspected pathogenesis of cardiac surgery-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) on the performance of the Cleveland Score, a risk assessment model for postoperative adverse kidney events. METHODS: This pilot study included 100 patients who underwent open-heart surgery. We determined improvements to the Cleveland Score when adding urinary biomarkers measured using clinical laboratory platforms (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL], interleukin-6) and those in the preclinical stage (hepcidin-25, midkine, alpha-1 microglobulin), all sampled immediately post-surgery. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events (MAKE), and the secondary endpoint was AKI. We performed ROC curve analysis, assessed baseline model performance (odds ratios [OR], 95% CI), and carried out statistical reclassification analyses to assess model improvement. RESULTS: NGAL (OR [95% CI] per 20 concentration-units wherever applicable): (1.07 [1.01–1.14]), Interleukin-6 (1.51 [1.01–2.26]), midkine (1.01 [1.00–1.02]), 1-hepcidin-25 (1.08 [1.00–1.17]), and NGAL/hepcidin-ratio (2.91 [1.30–6.49]) were independent predictors of MAKE and AKI (1.38 [1.03–1.85], 1.08 [1.01–1.15], 1.01 [1.00–1.02], 1.09 [1.01–1.18], and 3.45 [1.54–7.72]). Category-free net reclassification improvement identified interleukin-6 as a model-improving biomarker for MAKE and NGAL for AKI. However, only NGAL/hepcidin-25 improved model performance for event- and event-free patients for MAKE and AKI. CONCLUSIONS: NGAL and interleukin-6 measured immediately post cardiac surgery may complement the Cleveland Score. The combination of biomarkers with hepcidin-25 may further improve diagnostic discrimination.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Biomarkers , Complement System Proteins , Discrimination, Psychological , Hepcidins , Humans , Interleukin-6 , Kidney , Lipocalins , Pilot Projects , Risk Assessment , ROC Curve , Thoracic Surgery
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762473

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) is decreasing, cases of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB continue to increase. As conventional phenotype drug susceptibility testing (pDST) takes six to eight weeks, molecular assays are widely used to determine drug resistance. we developed QuantaMatrix Multiplexed Assay Platform (QMAP) MDR/XDR assay (QuantaMatrix Inc., Seoul, Korea) that can simultaneously detect mutations related to both first- and second-line drug resistance (rifampin, isoniazid, ethambutol, fluoroquinolones, second-line injectable drugs, and streptomycin). METHODS: We used 190 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains isolated from Myanmar, compared QMAP and pDST results, and determined concordance rates. Additionally, we performed sequence analyses for discordant results. RESULTS: QMAP results were 87.9% (167/190) concordant with pDST results. In the 23 isolates with discordant results, the QMAP and DNA sequencing results completely matched. CONCLUSIONS: The QMAP MDR/XDR assay can detect all known DNA mutations associated with drug resistance for both MDR- and XDR-MTB strains. It can be used for molecular diagnosis of MDR- and XDR-TB to rapidly initiate appropriate anti-TB drug therapy.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , DNA , Drug Resistance , Drug Therapy , Ethambutol , Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis , Fluoroquinolones , Incidence , Isoniazid , Myanmar , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Phenotype , Seoul , Sequence Analysis , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Tuberculosis , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762472

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) is caused by pathogenic variants in BRCA and other cancer-related genes. We analyzed variants in BRCA gene and other cancer-related genes in HBOC patients to evaluate the clinical validity of next-generation sequencing (NGS) multi-gene panel testing. METHODS: The BRCA1/2 NGS testing was conducted for 262 HBOC patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and direct Sanger sequencing were performed for confirmation. Multi-gene panel testing was conducted for 120 patients who did not possess BRCA1/2 pathogenic variants but met the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. RESULTS: Pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 were detected in 30 HBOC patients (11.5%). Additionally, four out of the 120 patients possessed pathogenic variants by multi-gene panel testing (3.3%): MSH2 (c.256G>T, p.Glu86*), PMS2 (c.1687C>T, p.Arg563*), CHEK2 (c.546C>A, p.Tyr182*), and PALB2 (c.3351-1G>C). All the four patients had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-gene panel testing could be a significant screening tool for HBOC patients, especially for those with a family history of cancer.


Subject(s)
Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome , Humans , Mass Screening , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: LINC01234, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), is overexpressed in several cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the role of LINC01234 in CRC development and confirmed its correlation with Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6), a tumor suppressor gene that is dysregulated in CRC. METHODS: We tested mRNA levels using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Tissue samples from patients with CRC, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hyperplastic polyp, and adenoma were included. Correlations between clinicopathological parameters, overall survival (OS) rate, and LINC01234 were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis H test. Additionally, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumor formation in nude mice were tested to investigate the mechanism of LINC01234. Western blotting was used to determine protein levels. RESULTS: LINC01234 expression was significantly upregulated in CRC tissues and CRC cell lines than in non-tumor tissues and normal epithelial cells, respectively. LINC01234 was associated with high tumor stage, larger tumor size, and metastasis. Patients with higher LINC01234 expression showed reduced OS. Cell proliferation was inhibited by LINC01234 knockdown, whereas apoptosis was enhanced. Mice injected with SW480 cells with LINC01234 knockdown displayed decreased tumor volume, weight, and Ki-67 levels compared with those injected with control cells. KLF6 was negatively regulated by LINC01234. Overexpression of KLF6 showed effects similar to those observed following LINC01234 knockdown on cell proliferation and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: LINC01234 could be a prognostic biomarker in CRC patients. Upregulation of LINC01234 in CRC promotes tumor development through negative regulation of KLF6.


Subject(s)
Adenoma , Animals , Apoptosis , Blotting, Western , Cell Line , Cell Proliferation , Colorectal Neoplasms , Epithelial Cells , Genes, Tumor Suppressor , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Mice , Mice, Nude , Neoplasm Metastasis , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polyps , Prognosis , Reverse Transcription , RNA, Long Noncoding , RNA, Messenger , Tumor Burden , Up-Regulation
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762470

ABSTRACT

Active surveillance culture (ASC) can help detect hidden reservoirs, but the routine use of ASC for extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae is controversial in an endemic situation. We aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (EBSL-Kpn) colonization among intensive care unit (ICU)-admitted patients. Prospective screening of ESBL-Kpn colonization was performed for ICU-admitted patients within 48 hours for two months. A perirectal swab sample was inoculated on MacConkey agar supplemented with 2 µg/mL ceftazidime. ESBL genotype was determined by PCR-sequencing, and clonal relatedness was evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The risk factors of ESBL-Kpn colonization were evaluated. The ESBL-Kpn colonization rate among the 281 patients at ICU admission was 6.4% (18/281), and bla(CTX-M-15) was detected in all isolates. ESBL producers also showed resistance to fluoroquinolone (38.9%, 7/18). All isolates had the same ESBL genotype (bla(CTX-M-15)) and a highly clustered PFGE pattern, suggesting cross-transmission without a documented outbreak. In univariate analysis, the risk factor for ESBL-Kpn colonization over the control was the length of hospital stay (odds ratio=1.062; P=0.019). Routine use of ASC could help control endemic ESBL–Kpn for ICU patients.


Subject(s)
Agar , Ceftazidime , Colon , Critical Care , Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field , Enterobacteriaceae , Genotype , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Klebsiella , Length of Stay , Mass Screening , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762469

ABSTRACT

The GENEDIA MTB/NTM Detection Kit (GENEDIA MTB/NTM; Green Cross Medical Science Corp., Chungbuk, Korea) is a multiplex real-time PCR assay used for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). While the importance of differential identification of MTB/NTM is recognized, there is limited data on the performance of GENEDIA MTB/NTM assay to date. A total of 687 consecutive sputum specimens were cultured and analyzed with the GENEDIA MTB/NTM and GENEDIA MTB assays. Nineteen specimens (2.8%) were MTBC-positive, and 69 (10.0%) were NTM-positive based on mycobacterial culture. All specimens showed concordant results for MTBC using both assays, with a kappa value of 1.00, overall sensitivity of 63.2% (12/19), and specificity of 100% (668/668). The overall NTM sensitivity and specificity were 23.2% (16/69) and 99.7% (616/618) for GENEDIA MTB/NTM. The association between NTM-positivity using GENEDIA MTB/NTM and the diagnosis of NTM pulmonary disease was not statistically significant. In conclusion, the two real-time PCR assays showed similar diagnostic performance for MTBC detection. However, the sensitivity for NTM detection was lower than that for MTBC detection.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , Lung Diseases , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Mycobacterium , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity , Sputum
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762468

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Primary Myelofibrosis
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762467

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Candida , Fungemia
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762462

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: JL1, a CD43 epitope and mucin family cell surface glycoprotein, is expressed on leukemic cells. An anti-JL1 antibody combined with a toxic substance can have targeted therapeutic effects against JL1-positive leukemia; however, JL1 expression on bone marrow (BM) lymphoma cells has not been assessed using flow cytometry. We investigated JL1 expression on BM lymphoma cells from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) to assess the potential of JL1 as a therapeutic target. METHODS: Patients with BM involvement of mature B-cell (N=44) or T- and natural killer (NK)-cell (N=4) lymphomas were enrolled from May 2015 to September 2016. JL1 expression on BM lymphoma cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Clinical, pathological, and cytogenetic characteristics, and treatment responses were compared according to JL1 expression status. RESULTS: Of the patients with NHL and BM involvement, 37.5% (18/48) were JL1-positive. Among mature B-cell lymphomas, 100%, 38.9%, 33.3%, 100%, and 25.0% of Burkitt lymphomas, diffuse large B-cell leukemias, mantle cell leukemias, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, and other B-cell lymphomas, respectively, were JL1-positive. Three mature T- and NK-cell NHLs were JL1-positive. JL1 expression was associated with age (P=0.045), complete response (P=0.004), and BM involvement at follow-up (P=0.017), but not with sex, performance status, the B symptoms, packed marrow pattern, cytogenetic abnormalities, or survival. CONCLUSIONS: JL1 positivity was associated with superior complete response and less BM involvement in NHL following chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes , Bone Marrow , Burkitt Lymphoma , Chromosome Aberrations , Cytogenetics , Drug Therapy , Flow Cytometry , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Leukemia , Leukemia, B-Cell , Lymphoma , Lymphoma, B-Cell , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin , Membrane Glycoproteins , Mucins , Therapeutic Uses , Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid and accurate diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is critical for initiating effective treatment and achieving better prognosis. We investigated the performance of copeptin for early diagnosis of AMI, in comparison with creatine kinase myocardial band (CK-MB) and troponin I (TnI). METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 271 patients presenting with chest pain (within six hours of onset), suggestive of acute coronary syndrome, at an emergency department (ED). Serum CK-MB, TnI, and copeptin levels were measured. The diagnostic performance of CK-MB, TnI, and copeptin, alone and in combination, for AMI was assessed by ROC curve analysis by comparing the area under the curve (AUC). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of each marker were obtained, and the characteristics of each marker were analyzed. RESULTS: The patients were diagnosed as having ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI; N=43), non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI; N=25), unstable angina (N=78), or other diseases (N=125). AUC comparisons showed copeptin had significantly better diagnostic performance than TnI in patients with chest pain within two hours of onset (AMI: P=0.022, ≤1 hour; STEMI: P=0.017, ≤1 hour and P=0.010, ≤2 hours). In addition, TnI and copeptin in combination exhibited significantly better diagnostic performance than CK-MB plus TnI in AMI and STEMI patients. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of TnI and copeptin improves AMI diagnostic performance in patients with early-onset chest pain in an ED setting.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , Angina, Unstable , Area Under Curve , Chest Pain , Creatine Kinase , Diagnosis , Early Diagnosis , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Myocardial Infarction , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Sensitivity and Specificity , Troponin I
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