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1.
Am J Infect Control ; 50(5): 563-571, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557001

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hand hygiene (HH) is a cost-effective measure to reduce health care-associated infections. The overall characteristics and changes of hand hygiene compliance (HHC) among health care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic provided evidence for targeted HH intervention measures. AIM: To systematically review the literature and conduct a meta-analysis of studies investigating the rate of HHC and the characteristics of HH during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI, WanFang Data, VIP, and CBM databases were searched. All the original articles with valid HHC data among health care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic (from January 1, 2020 to October 1, 2021) were included. Meta-analysis was performed using a DerSimonian and Laird model to yield a point estimate and a 95% CI for the HHC rate. The heterogeneity of the studies was evaluated using the Cochrane Q test and I2 statistics and a random-effects model was used to contrast between different occupations, the WHO 5-moments of HH and different observation methods. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) reporting guidelines were followed. FINDINGS: Seven studies with 2,377 health care providers reporting HHC were identified. The estimated overall HHC was 74%, which was higher than that reported in previous studies (5%-89%). Fever clinic has become a new key place for HHC observation. Nurses had the highest HHC (80%; 95% CI:74%-87%) while auxiliary workers (70%; 95%CI:62%-77%) had the lowest. For the WHO 5-moments, the health care providers had the highest HHC after contact with the body fluids of the patients (91%; 95% CI:88%-94%), while before contact with patient's health care providers had the lowest HHC (68%; 95% CI:62%-74%) which was consistent with before the pandemic. There existed great HHC differences among different monitoring methods (automatic monitoring system:53%; 95% CI:44%-63% versus openly and secretly observation: 91%; 95% CI: 90%-91%). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the compliance of health care providers' HH showed a great improvement. The fever clinics have become the focused departments for HH monitoring. The HHC of auxiliary workers and the HH opportunity for "before contact with patients" should be strengthened. In the future, it will be necessary to develop standardized HH monitoring tools for practical work.

2.
Pharmacological Research - Modern Chinese Medicine ; : 100007, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1401788

ABSTRACT

Targeted therapeutics for SARS-CoV-2 virus caused COVID-19 are in urgent need. Cinobufacini has been reported to have broad-spectrum antiviral effects and widely used in Southeast Asian countries. This study aims to assess the efficacy of Cinobufacini injection in treating patients with severe COVID-19. A randomized preliminary clinical trial was conducted and eligible patients were allocated to receive general treatment plus Cinobufacini injection or only general treatment as control for 7 days. The primary outcomes of the oxygenation index PaO2/FiO2 and ROX, secondary outcomes of white blood cell count, respiratory support step-down time (RSST), safety indicators, etc were monitored. After 7 days of treatment, the oxygenation index was improved in 95.2% patients in the treatment group compared with 68.4% in the control group. The PaO2/FiO2 and ROX indices in the treatment group (mean, 226.27±67.35 and 14.01±3.99 respectively) were significantly higher than the control group (mean, 143.23±51.29 and 9.64±5.54 respectively). The RSST was 1 day shorter in the treatment group. Multivariate regression analysis suggested that Cinobufacini injection contributed the most to the outcome of PaO2/FiO2. No obvious adverse effects were observed. The preliminary data showed that Cinobufacini injection had apparent efficacy in improving the respiratory function of patients with severe COVID-19.

3.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e045454, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398649

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This phenomenological study aimed to examine intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' experiences of caring for patients with COVID-19, and understand better their everyday experiences of patient' management in the ICU. DESIGN: A descriptive phenomenological research design was used. Individual interviews were conducted. The data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Colaizzi's seven-step framework. SETTING: An ICU with 16 beds in a tertiary hospital in Wuhan, China. PARTICIPANTS: Nurses who had more than 1 year of experience and had provided care to patients with COVID-19 in ICU for more than 1 week were identified as participants. A total of 13 nurses were interviewed. RESULTS: An analysis of these significant statements yielded four distinct stages of feelings, thereby revealing the essence of this phenomenon. Worry about being infected and infecting family members was present across in all four stages. The themes associated with the four stages were as follows: initial contradictory feelings, quick adaption to the 'new working environment' in the first 1-2 weeks in the ICU, desperation after adaption, holding on and survive. CONCLUSIONS: The nurses reported distinct experiences of providing care to patients with COVID-19 in ICUs. Interventions, such as providing information about the disease, simulation training, emotional support and follow-up care, are needed to help nurses manage patients with COVID-19 and maintain nurses' health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(5): 5146-5155, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reduning injection is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with known efficacy against a variety of viral infections, but there is no data about its efficacy against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: To explore the efficacy and safety of Reduning injection in the treatment of COVID-19, a randomized, open-labeled, multicenter, controlled trial was conducted from 12 general hospitals between 2020.02.06 and 2020.03.23. Patients with COVID-19 who met the diagnostic criteria of the "Diagnosis and Treatment Program for Novel Coronavirus Infection Pneumonia (Trial Fifth Edition)". Patients were randomized to routine treatment with or without Reduning injection (20 mL/day for 14 days) (ChiCTR2000029589). The primary endpoint was the rate of achieving clinical symptom recovery on day 14 of treatment. RESULTS: There were 77 and 80 participants in the Reduning and control groups. The symptom resolution rate at 14 days was higher in the Reduning injection than in controls [full-analysis set (FAS): 84.4% vs. 60.0%, P=0.0004]. Compared with controls, the Reduning group showed shorter median time to resolution of the clinical symptoms (143 vs. 313.5 h, P<0.001), shorter to nucleic acid test turning negative (146.5 vs. 255.5 h, P<0.001), shorter hospital stay (14.1 vs. 18.1 days, P<0.001), and shorter time to defervescence (29 vs. 71 h, P<0.001). There was no difference in AEs (3.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.383). CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary trial suggests that Reduning injection might be effective and safe in patients with symptomatic COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
6.
Mil Med Res ; 7(1): 4, 2020 02 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-405

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a new type viral pneumonia cases occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province; and then named "2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)" by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 12 January 2020. For it is a never been experienced respiratory disease before and with infection ability widely and quickly, it attracted the world's attention but without treatment and control manual. For the request from frontline clinicians and public health professionals of 2019-nCoV infected pneumonia management, an evidence-based guideline urgently needs to be developed. Therefore, we drafted this guideline according to the rapid advice guidelines methodology and general rules of WHO guideline development; we also added the first-hand management data of Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University. This guideline includes the guideline methodology, epidemiological characteristics, disease screening and population prevention, diagnosis, treatment and control (including traditional Chinese Medicine), nosocomial infection prevention and control, and disease nursing of the 2019-nCoV. Moreover, we also provide a whole process of a successful treatment case of the severe 2019-nCoV infected pneumonia and experience and lessons of hospital rescue for 2019-nCoV infections. This rapid advice guideline is suitable for the first frontline doctors and nurses, managers of hospitals and healthcare sections, community residents, public health persons, relevant researchers, and all person who are interested in the 2019-nCoV.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Cross Infection , Infection Control , Mass Screening , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Diagnosis, Differential , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Evidence-Based Medicine , Fluid Therapy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Molecular Epidemiology , Nursing Care , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
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