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1.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 103: 108463, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587490

ABSTRACT

Therapeutics that impair the innate immune responses of the liver during the inflammatory cytokine storm like that occurring in COVID-19 are greatly needed. Much interest is currently directed toward Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors as potential candidates to mitigate this life-threatening complication. Accordingly, this study investigated the influence of the novel JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib (RXB) on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and systemic hyperinflammation in mice to simulate the context occurring in COVID-19 patients. Mice were orally treated with RXB (75 and 150 mg/kg) 2 h prior to the intravenous administration of Con A (20 mg/kg) for a period of 12 h. The results showed that RXB pretreatments were efficient in abrogating Con A-instigated hepatocellular injury (ALT, AST, LDH), necrosis (histopathology), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) and nuclear proliferation due to damage (PCNA). The protective mechanism of RXB were attributed to i) prevention of Con A-enhanced hepatic production and systemic release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17A, which coincided with decreasing infiltration of immune cells (monocytes, neutrophils), ii) reducing Con A-induced hepatic overexpression of IL-1ß and CD98 alongside NF-κB activation, and iii) lessening Con A-induced consumption of GSH and GSH peroxidase and generation of oxidative stress products (MDA, 4-HNE, NOx) in the liver. In summary, JAK inhibition by RXB led to eminent protection of the liver against Con A-deleterious manifestations primarily via curbing the inflammatory cytokine storm driven by TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17A.


Subject(s)
Concanavalin A/toxicity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/chemically induced , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Nitriles/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Aldehydes/metabolism , Animals , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation/chemically induced , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Male , Malondialdehyde/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nitrates/metabolism , Nitriles/administration & dosage , Nitrites/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Peroxidase/metabolism , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
2.
Molecules ; 26(21)2021 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488679

ABSTRACT

Zinc is the second most abundant trace element in the human body, and it plays a fundamental role in human physiology, being an integral component of hundreds of enzymes and transcription factors. The discovery that zinc atoms may compete with copper for their absorption in the gastrointestinal tract let to introduce zinc in the therapy of Wilson's disease, a congenital disorder of copper metabolism characterized by a systemic copper storage. Nowadays, zinc salts are considered one of the best therapeutic approach in patients affected by Wilson's disease. On the basis of the similarities, at histological level, between Wilson's disease and non-alcoholic liver disease, zinc has been successfully introduced in the therapy of non-alcoholic liver disease, with positive effects both on insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Recently, zinc deficiency has been indicated as a possible factor responsible for the susceptibility of elderly patients to undergo infection by SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Here, we present the data correlating zinc deficiency with the insurgence and progression of Covid-19 with low zinc levels associated with severe disease states. Finally, the relevance of zinc supplementation in aged people at risk for SARS-CoV-2 is underlined, with the aim that the zinc-based drug, classically used in the treatment of copper overload, might be recorded as one of the tools reducing the mortality of COVID-19, particularly in elderly people.


Subject(s)
Liver/drug effects , Liver/injuries , Zinc/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chelating Agents/metabolism , Copper/metabolism , Hepatolenticular Degeneration/complications , Hepatolenticular Degeneration/drug therapy , Hepatolenticular Degeneration/metabolism , Humans , Liver/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Zinc/deficiency , Zinc/metabolism
3.
BMC Pharmacol Toxicol ; 22(1): 61, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477468

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence and rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) in thelate 2019 has caused a devastating global pandemic of the severe pneumonia-like disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although vaccines have been and are being developed, they are not accessible to everyone and not everyone can receive these vaccines. Also, it typically takes more than 10 years until a new therapeutic agent is approved for usage. Therefore, repurposing of known drugs can lend itself well as a key approach for significantly expediting the development of new therapies for COVID-19. METHODS: We have incorporated machine learning-based computational tools and in silico models into the drug discovery process to predict Adsorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity (ADMET) profiles of 90 potential drugs for COVID-19 treatment identified from two independent studies mainly with the purpose of mitigating late-phase failures because of inferior pharmacokinetics and toxicity. RESULTS: Here, we summarize the cardiotoxicity and general toxicity profiles of 90 potential drugs for COVID-19 treatment and outline the risks of repurposing and propose a stratification of patients accordingly. We shortlist a total of five compounds based on their non-toxic properties. CONCLUSION: In summary, this manuscript aims to provide a potentially useful source of essential knowledge on toxicity assessment of 90 compounds for healthcare practitioners and researchers to find off-label alternatives for the treatment for COVID-19. The majority of the molecules discussed in this manuscript have already moved into clinical trials and thus their known pharmacological and human safety profiles are expected to facilitate a fast track preclinical and clinical assessment for treating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/toxicity , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Drug Repositioning , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Captopril/therapeutic use , Cardiotoxins/toxicity , Catechols/therapeutic use , Computational Biology , Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/metabolism , Drug Discovery/methods , Humans , Indomethacin/therapeutic use , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Liver/drug effects , Mice , Models, Biological , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Rats , Reproduction/drug effects , Software , Valproic Acid/therapeutic use
4.
Lipids Health Dis ; 20(1): 126, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448237

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At present, the COVID-19 has been prevalent worldwide for more than a year and caused more than four million deaths. Liver injury was frequently observed in patients with COVID-19. Recently, a new definition of metabolic dysfunction associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed by a panel of international experts, and the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 has been actively investigated. Several previous studies indicated that the patients with MAFLD had a higher prevalence of COVID-19 and a tendency to develop severe type of respiratory infection, and others indicated that liver injury would be exacerbated in the patients with MAFLD once infected with COVID-19. The mechanism underlying the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 infection has not been thoroughly investigated, and recent studies indicated that multifactorial mechanisms, such as altered host angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor expression, direct viral attack, disruption of cholangiocyte function, systemic inflammatory reaction, drug-induced liver injury, hepatic ischemic and hypoxic injury, and MAFLD-related glucose and lipid metabolic disorders, might jointly contribute to both of the adverse hepatic and respiratory outcomes. In this review, we discussed the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 based on current available literature, and summarized the recommendations for clinical management of MAFLD patients during the pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/complications , Hypoxia/complications , Liver/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/pathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dipeptides/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Glucose/metabolism , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19458, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447326

ABSTRACT

Efficacious therapeutics for Ebola virus disease are in great demand. Ebola virus infections mediated by mucosal exposure, and aerosolization in particular, present a novel challenge due to nontypical massive early infection of respiratory lymphoid tissues. We performed a randomized and blinded study to compare outcomes from vehicle-treated and remdesivir-treated rhesus monkeys in a lethal model of infection resulting from aerosolized Ebola virus exposure. Remdesivir treatment initiated 4 days after exposure was associated with a significant survival benefit, significant reduction in serum viral titer, and improvements in clinical pathology biomarker levels and lung histology compared to vehicle treatment. These observations indicate that remdesivir may have value in countering aerosol-induced Ebola virus disease.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Ebolavirus/drug effects , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Administration, Intravenous , Aerosols , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/blood , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Liver/drug effects , Liver/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lymph Nodes/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymph Nodes/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Random Allocation , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Viral Load/drug effects , Viremia/drug therapy
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17810, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402118

ABSTRACT

Transporters in the human liver play a major role in the clearance of endo- and xenobiotics. Apical (canalicular) transporters extrude compounds to the bile, while basolateral hepatocyte transporters promote the uptake of, or expel, various compounds from/into the venous blood stream. In the present work we have examined the in vitro interactions of some key repurposed drugs advocated to treat COVID-19 (lopinavir, ritonavir, ivermectin, remdesivir and favipiravir), with the key drug transporters of hepatocytes. These transporters included ABCB11/BSEP, ABCC2/MRP2, and SLC47A1/MATE1 in the canalicular membrane, as well as ABCC3/MRP3, ABCC4/MRP4, SLC22A1/OCT1, SLCO1B1/OATP1B1, SLCO1B3/OATP1B3, and SLC10A1/NTCP, residing in the basolateral membrane. Lopinavir and ritonavir in low micromolar concentrations inhibited BSEP and MATE1 exporters, as well as OATP1B1/1B3 uptake transporters. Ritonavir had a similar inhibitory pattern, also inhibiting OCT1. Remdesivir strongly inhibited MRP4, OATP1B1/1B3, MATE1 and OCT1. Favipiravir had no significant effect on any of these transporters. Since both general drug metabolism and drug-induced liver toxicity are strongly dependent on the functioning of these transporters, the various interactions reported here may have important clinical relevance in the drug treatment of this viral disease and the existing co-morbidities.


Subject(s)
ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 11/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Liver-Specific Organic Anion Transporter 1/metabolism , Liver/drug effects , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 11/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Comorbidity , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Liver-Specific Organic Anion Transporter 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Lopinavir/chemistry , Lopinavir/metabolism , Lopinavir/pharmacology , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Ritonavir/chemistry , Ritonavir/metabolism , Ritonavir/pharmacology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Substrate Specificity
7.
Sci Adv ; 7(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388432

ABSTRACT

Using AI, we identified baricitinib as having antiviral and anticytokine efficacy. We now show a 71% (95% CI 0.15 to 0.58) mortality benefit in 83 patients with moderate-severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with few drug-induced adverse events, including a large elderly cohort (median age, 81 years). An additional 48 cases with mild-moderate pneumonia recovered uneventfully. Using organotypic 3D cultures of primary human liver cells, we demonstrate that interferon-α2 increases ACE2 expression and SARS-CoV-2 infectivity in parenchymal cells by greater than fivefold. RNA-seq reveals gene response signatures associated with platelet activation, fully inhibited by baricitinib. Using viral load quantifications and superresolution microscopy, we found that baricitinib exerts activity rapidly through the inhibition of host proteins (numb-associated kinases), uniquely among antivirals. This reveals mechanistic actions of a Janus kinase-1/2 inhibitor targeting viral entry, replication, and the cytokine storm and is associated with beneficial outcomes including in severely ill elderly patients, data that incentivize further randomized controlled trials.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Azetidines/pharmacology , COVID-19/mortality , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Liver/virology , Purines/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokines/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Interferon alpha-2/metabolism , Italy , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Liver/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Safety , Platelet Activation , Proportional Hazards Models , RNA-Seq , Spain , Virus Internalization/drug effects
8.
Biochimie ; 179: 266-274, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326918

ABSTRACT

Obese patients who often present metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) are at risk of severe presentation of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These patients are more likely to be hospitalized and receive antiviral agents and other drugs required to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome and systemic inflammation, combat bacterial and fungal superinfections and reverse multi-organ failure. Among these pharmaceuticals, antiretrovirals such as lopinavir/ritonavir and remdesivir, antibiotics and antifungal agents can induce drug-induced liver injury (DILI), whose mechanisms are not always understood. In the present article, we hypothesize that obese COVID-19 patients with MAFLD might be at higher risk for DILI than non-infected healthy individuals or MAFLD patients. These patients present several concomitant factors, which individually can favour DILI: polypharmacy, systemic inflammation at risk of cytokine storm, fatty liver and sometimes nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) as well as insulin resistance and other diseases linked to obesity. Hence, in obese COVID-19 patients, some drugs might cause more severe (and/or more frequent) DILI, while others might trigger the transition of fatty liver to NASH, or worsen pre-existing steatosis, necroinflammation and fibrosis. We also present the main mechanisms whereby drugs can be more hepatotoxic in MAFLD including impaired activity of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered lipid homeostasis and oxidative stress. Although comprehensive investigations are needed to confirm our hypothesis, we believe that the current epidemic of obesity and related metabolic diseases has extensively contributed to increase the number of cases of DILI in COVID-19 patients, which may have participated in presentation severity and death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/physiopathology , Humans , Liver/drug effects , Liver/physiopathology
9.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 43(8): 472-480, 2020 Oct.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1235898

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has proven to be a serious challenge for the Spanish healthcare system. The impact of the virus on the liver is not well known, but in patients with chronic liver disease, mostly in advanced stages, it can critically compromise survival and trigger decompensation. Treatment in this subpopulation is complex due to the potential hepatotoxicity of some of the medicinal products used. Moreover, the pandemic has also negatively impacted patients with liver disease who have not contracted COVID-19, since the reallocation of human and material resources to the care of patients with the virus has resulted in a decrease in the treatment, diagnosis and follow-up of patients with liver disease, which will surely have negative consequences in the near future. Efficient reorganization of hepatology units is a priority to minimise the impact of the pandemic on a population as vulnerable as liver disease patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Age Factors , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bile Ducts/virology , COVID-19 , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Disease Susceptibility , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Hepatitis, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis, Chronic/epidemiology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Liver Function Tests , Liver Transplantation , Obesity/epidemiology , Resource Allocation , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Biochem Mol Toxicol ; 35(7): e22795, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222632

ABSTRACT

The world is currently facing an unprecedented pandemic caused by a newly recognized and highly pathogenic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19; induced by SARS-CoV-2 virus), which is a severe and ongoing threat to global public health. Since COVID-19 was officially declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020, several drug regimens have rapidly undergone clinical trials for the management of COVID-19. However, one of the major issues is drug-induced organ injury, which is a prominent clinical challenge. Unfortunately, most drugs used against COVID-19 are associated with adverse effects in different organs, such as the kidney, heart, and liver. These side effects are dangerous and, in some cases, they can be lethal. More importantly, organ injury is also a clinical manifestation of COVID-19 infection. These adverse reactions are increasingly recognized as outcomes of COVID-19 infection. Therefore, the differential diagnosis of drug-induced adverse effects from COVID-19-induced organ injury is a clinical complication. This review highlights the importance of drug-induced organ injury, its known mechanisms, and the potential therapeutic strategies in COVID-19 pharmacotherapy. We review the potential strategies for the differential diagnosis of drug-induced organ injury. This information can facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies, not only against COVID-19 but also for future outbreaks of other emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/metabolism , Cardiovascular System/drug effects , Cardiovascular System/injuries , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Inflammation , Kidney/drug effects , Kidney/injuries , Liver/drug effects , Liver/injuries , Oxidative Stress
11.
J Clin Invest ; 131(6)2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172783

ABSTRACT

Monocyte homing to the liver and adhesion to the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are key elements in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) pathogenesis. We reported previously that VCAM-1 mediates monocyte adhesion to LSECs. However, the pathogenic role of VCAM-1 in NASH is unclear. Herein, we report that VCAM-1 was a top upregulated adhesion molecule in the NASH mouse liver transcriptome. Open chromatin landscape profiling combined with genome-wide transcriptome analysis showed robust transcriptional upregulation of LSEC VCAM-1 in murine NASH. Moreover, LSEC VCAM-1 expression was significantly increased in human NASH. LSEC VCAM-1 expression was upregulated by palmitate treatment in vitro and reduced with inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase (MAP3K) mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3). Likewise, LSEC VCAM-1 expression was reduced in the Mlk3-/- mice with diet-induced NASH. Furthermore, VCAM-1 neutralizing Ab or pharmacological inhibition attenuated diet-induced NASH in mice, mainly via reducing the proinflammatory monocyte hepatic population as examined by mass cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF). Moreover, endothelium-specific Vcam1 knockout mice were also protected against NASH. In summary, lipotoxic stress enhances the expression of LSEC VCAM-1, in part, through MLK3 signaling. Inhibition of VCAM-1 was salutary in murine NASH and might serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for human NASH.


Subject(s)
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/etiology , Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Disease Models, Animal , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/genetics , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , Palmitates/toxicity , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Up-Regulation/drug effects , Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/genetics
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7132, 2021 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159001

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of ivermectin for the treatment of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a type 2 family RNA coronavirus similar to SARS-CoV-2. Female BALB/cJ mice were infected with 6,000 PFU of MHV-A59 (group infected, n = 20) or infected and then immediately treated with a single dose of 500 µg/kg ivermectin (group infected + IVM, n = 20) or were not infected and treated with PBS (control group, n = 16). Five days after infection/treatment, the mice were euthanized and the tissues were sampled to assess their general health status and infection levels. Overall, the results demonstrated that viral infection induced typical MHV-caused disease, with the livers showing severe hepatocellular necrosis surrounded by a severe lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory infiltration associated with a high hepatic viral load (52,158 AU), while mice treated with ivermectin showed a better health status with a lower viral load (23,192 AU; p < 0.05), with only a few having histopathological liver damage (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the group infected + IVM and control group mice (P = NS). Furthermore, serum transaminase levels (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) were significantly lower in the treated mice than in the infected animals. In conclusion, ivermectin diminished the MHV viral load and disease in the mice, being a useful model for further understanding this therapy against coronavirus diseases.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Ivermectin/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Body Weight/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Ivermectin/administration & dosage , Kidney/drug effects , Kidney/metabolism , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Monocytes/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , Neutrophils/drug effects , Proteins/metabolism , Transaminases/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Viral Load/drug effects
13.
Toxicology ; 455: 152765, 2021 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152677

ABSTRACT

Liver damage is observed in up to half of hospitalized COVID-19 patients and can result either from actions of SARS-CoV-2 as such or from pharmacological treatment. The present paper introduces an adverse outcome pathway construct that mechanistically describes the pathways induced by SARS-CoV-2 leading to liver injury. This can be caused by direct binding of the virus and local actions in cholangiocytes, but may also indirectly result from the general state of hypoxia and systemic inflammation in COVID-19 patients. Further research is urgently needed to fill remaining knowledge gaps. This will be anticipated to create a solid basis for future and more targeted development of vaccines and, in particular, therapies.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Liver Diseases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/metabolism , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Liver Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
14.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2227, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148855

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of Covid-19 which was classified as a global pandemic in March 2020. The increasing global health and economic burden of SARS-CoV-2 has necessitated urgent investigations into the pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic and vaccination regimens. Human trials of vaccine and antiviral candidates have been undertaken, but basic pathogenetic studies are still required to inform these trials. Gaps in understanding of cellular infection by, and immunity to, SARS-CoV-2 mean additional models are required to assist in improved design of these therapeutics. Human organoids are three-dimensional models that contain multiple cell types and mimic human organs in ex vivo culture conditions. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has been implicated in causing not only respiratory injury but also injury to other organs such as the brain, liver and kidneys. Consequently, a variety of different organoid models have been employed to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of disease due to SARS-CoV-2. Data on these models have not been systematically assembled. In this review, we highlight key findings from studies that have utilised different human organoid types to investigate the expression of SARS-CoV-2 receptors, permissiveness, immune response, dysregulation of cellular functions, and potential antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Models, Biological , Organoids/immunology , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Brain/drug effects , Brain/immunology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Culture Techniques , Colon/drug effects , Colon/immunology , Colon/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Liver/drug effects , Liver/immunology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
15.
J Pharm Biomed Anal ; 194: 113806, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065380

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is a prodrug of the nucleotide analogue and used for COVID-19 treatment. However, the bioanalysis of the active metabolites remdesivir nucleotide triphosphate (RTP) and its precursor remdesivir nucleotide monophosphate (RMP) is very challenging. Herein, we established a novel method to separate RTP and RMP on a BioBasic AX column and quantified them by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in positive electrospray ionization mode. Stepwise, we optimized chromatographic retention on an anion exchange column, improved stability in matrix through the addition of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2nitrobenzoic acid) and PhosSTOP EASYpack, and increased recovery by dissociation of tight protein binding with 2 % formic acid aqueous solution. The method allowed lower limit of quantification of 20 nM for RMP and 10 nM for RTP. Method validation demonstrated acceptable accuracy (93.6%-103% for RMP, 94.5%-107% for RTP) and precision (RSD < 11.9 % for RMP, RSD < 11.4 % for RTP), suggesting that it was sensitive and robust for simultaneous quantification of RMP and RTP. The method was successfully applied to analyze RMP and RTP in mouse tissues. In general, the developed method is suitable to monitor RMP and RTP, and provides a useful approach for exploring more detailed effects of remdesivir in treating diseases.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Prodrugs/analysis , Prodrugs/metabolism , Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods , Adenosine Monophosphate/analysis , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analysis , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/analysis , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Chromatography, Liquid/methods , Humans , Liver/chemistry , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Male , Mice , Prodrugs/pharmacology
17.
Drug Deliv ; 28(1): 325-342, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1057773

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of matrine in treatment of COVID-19 combined with liver injury. Potential targets related to matrine, COVID-19 and liver injury were identified from several databases. We constructed PPI network and screened the core targets according to the degree value. Then, GO and KEGG enrichment were carried out. Molecular docking technology was used to verify the affinity between matrine and the crystal structure of core target protein. Finally, real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the effects of matrine on hub gene expression in liver tissue of liver injury mice and lung tissue of lung injury mice to further confirm the results of network pharmacological analysis. The results show that six core targets including AKT1, TP53, TNF, IL6, BCL2L1 and ATM were identified. The potential therapeutic mechanism of matrine on COVID-19 combined with liver injury is closely related to regulate antiviral process, improve immune system and regulate the level of inflammatory factors. Molecular docking showed that matrine could spontaneously bind to the receptor protein and had strong binding force. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that matrine could significantly reduce the expression of AKT1, TP53, TNF, IL6 and ATM in mice with liver injury or lung injury (P < 0.05), and increase the expression of BCL2L1 to a certain extent (P > 0.05). Our results indicate that matrine can achieve simultaneous intervention of COVID-19 combined with liver injury by multi-dimensional pharmacological mechanism.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/epidemiology , Molecular Docking Simulation/methods , Quinolizines/pharmacology , Alkaloids/administration & dosage , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Liver/drug effects , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Quinolizines/administration & dosage , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/drug effects
18.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(3): 2429-2438, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029919

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) is the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Lung lesions are considered to be the main damage caused by SARSCoV-2 infection. In addition, liver injury has also been reported to occur during the course of the disease in severe cases. However, the effect of antiviral treatment on liver injury in critically ill patients is not yet clear. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the effect of antiviral treatment and antiviral drug arbidol on liver injury in COVID-19 critically ill patients. Baseline characteristics were collected from patients who were admitted to intensive care units of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, and confounders were balanced by propensity score matching (PSM) and inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) analyses. RESULTS: Both the PSM (OR=2.77; 95% CI: 1.03, 7.48; P=0.045) and the IPTW-adjusted (OR=2.33; 95% CI: 1.02, 5.34; P=0.047) results showed that COVID-19 critically ill patients receiving antiviral treatment had a significantly higher risk of liver injury. However, arbidol treatment did not have a significant effect on liver injury (IPTW: OR=2.11; 95% CI: 0.79, 5.67; P=0.14). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that although arbidol treatment does not seem to be significantly associated with liver injury complications, the overall use of antiviral drugs increases the risk of liver injury for critically ill patients with COVID-19. Antiviral drugs are widely used to treat COVID-19, but we recommend that for critically ill patients, antiviral treatment should be used with caution considering both effectiveness and potential adverse effects.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indoles/adverse effects , Liver/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury , China , Critical Illness , Humans , Indoles/therapeutic use , Liver/pathology , Retrospective Studies
19.
Immunol Lett ; 217: 25-30, 2020 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-888577

ABSTRACT

In a previous work we demonstrated that inhibition of mouse indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by methyltryptophan (MT) exacerbated the pathological actions of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) infection, suggesting that tryptophan (TRP) catabolism was involved in viral effects. Since there is a second enzyme that dioxygenates TRP, tryptophan-2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO), which is mainly located in liver, we decided to study its role in our model of MHV-infection. Results showed that in vivo TDO inhibition by LM10, a derivative of 3-(2-(pyridyl) ethenyl) indole, resulted in a decrease of anti- MHV Ab titers induced by the virus infection. Besides, a reduction of some alarmin release, i.e, uric acid and high-mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), was observed. Accordingly, since alarmin liberation was related to the expression of autoantibodies (autoAb) to fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), these autoAb also diminished. Moreover, PCR results indicated that TDO inhibition did not abolish viral replication. Furthermore, histological liver examination did not reveal strong pathologies, whereas mouse survival was hundred percent in control as well as in MHV-infected mice treated with LM10. Data presented in this work indicate that in spite of the various TDO actions already described, specific TDO blockage could also restrain some MHV actions, mainly suppressing autoimmune reactions. Such results should prompt further experiments with various viruses to confirm the possible use of a TDO inhibitor such as LM-10 to treat either viral infections or even autoimmune diseases triggered by a viral infection.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/enzymology , Autoimmunity/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Liver/enzymology , Murine hepatitis virus/immunology , Tryptophan Oxygenase/antagonists & inhibitors , Tryptophan Oxygenase/metabolism , Alarmins/metabolism , Animals , Autoantibodies/drug effects , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , HMGB1 Protein/blood , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Hydrolases/immunology , Indoles/therapeutic use , Liver/drug effects , Liver/immunology , Liver/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/growth & development , Tryptophan/metabolism , Tryptophan Oxygenase/genetics , Uric Acid/blood , Uric Acid/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/immunology
20.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 54(1): 109-112, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813695

ABSTRACT

No specific therapy is available for COVID-19. We report the effectiveness and adverse effects of triple therapy with hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and ciclesonide in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. The clinical condition of the patients improved within 5 days in response to the therapy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pregnenediones/therapeutic use , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Liver/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tokyo/epidemiology
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