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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(3)2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736042

ABSTRACT

Although neurological manifestations such as headache and myalgias have been observed with COVID-19, presentation with more serious neurological illness is uncommon and rare. We report a case of a middle-aged woman who presented to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital. Her clinical presentation was primarily neurological rather than the more common presentation with respiratory manifestations. She presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures, along with history of undocumented low-grade fever and generalised body aches. The positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR nasal swab, the cerebrospinal fluid analysis (lymphocytic pleocytosis) and electroencephalogram were consistent with viral encephalitis; brain imaging was unremarkable. This case highlights the variable presenting features of COVID-19 infection as patients can primarily present with neurological manifestations in the absence of significant respiratory symptoms. We believe it is important to recognise neurological disease associated with SARS-CoV-2 in patients with asymptomatic respiratory infection.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Brain Diseases/complications , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/etiology , Status Epilepticus/complications
2.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 22(1): 11-17, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653759

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Seizures, including status epilepticus, have been reported in association with acute COVID-19 infection. People with epilepsy (PWE) have suffered from seizure exacerbations during the pandemic. This article reviews the data for clinical and electrographic seizures associated with COVID-19, technical EEG considerations for reducing risk of transmission, and factors contributing to seizure exacerbations in PWE as well as strategies to address this issue. RECENT FINDINGS: An increasing number of studies of larger cohorts, accounting for a variety of variables and often utilizing EEG with standardized terminology, are assessing the prevalence of seizures in hospitalized patients with acute COVID-19 infections, and gaining insight into the prevalence of seizures and their effect on outcomes. Additionally, recent studies are evaluating the effect of the pandemic on PWE, barriers faced, and the usefulness of telehealth. Although there is still much to learn regarding COVID-19, current studies help in assessing the risk of seizures, guiding EEG utilization, and optimizing the use of telehealth during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Status Epilepticus , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Seizures/complications , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/therapy , Status Epilepticus/epidemiology , Status Epilepticus/etiology , Status Epilepticus/therapy
3.
Neurol Sci ; 43(4): 2277-2283, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640871

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The disease was declared a pandemic on March 11th, 2020, by the World Health Organization (WHO). There has been a substantial increase in the epileptic seizures and status epilepticus reported in the pandemic period. In this context, it is aimed with this study to identify the electroencephalography (EEG) features of patients admitted to the intensive care unit with the diagnosis of COVID-19 and to look for any specific patterns in these features. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The material of this study primarily comprised the neurological evaluations and continuous EEG recordings of 87 intensive care patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19. In addition, demographic and clinical features and comorbid conditions of these patients were also analyzed, and any correlation thereof was investigated. RESULTS: The EEG data of 87 patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and were followed up in the intensive care unit were recorded and then analyzed. Abnormal EEG findings were detected in 93.1% (n = 81) of the patients, which were found to increase significantly with age (p < 0.001). The mean age of patients with specific epileptiform abnormalities on EEG was found to be significantly higher than those with non-specific abnormalities. Epileptiform discharges were seen in 37.9% (n = 33) of the patients. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) was detected in 5.7% of the patients, and antiepileptic drugs were started in 25 (28.7%) of the patients. DISCUSSION: Statistically significant EEG changes were observed in the continuous EEGs of the patients followed up in the intensive care unit due to COVID-19 infection. However, further studies are needed to associate the EEG changes observed in the COVID-19 patients with the epileptogenesis of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Critical Care , Electroencephalography , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/epidemiology
5.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(2): 626-647, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518031

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a clinical presentation, neither a specific diagnosis nor a clinical entity. It refers to a patient without active epilepsy or other pre-existing relevant neurological disorder, with a NORSE without a clear acute or active structural, toxic or metabolic cause. This study reviews the currently available evidence about the aetiology of patients presenting with NORSE and NORSE-related conditions. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for clinical trials, observational studies, case series and case reports including patients who presented with NORSE, febrile-infection-related epilepsy syndrome or the infantile hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia and epilepsy syndrome. RESULTS: Four hundred and fifty records were initially identified, of which 197 were included in the review. The selected studies were retrospective case-control (n = 11), case series (n = 83) and case reports (n = 103) and overall described 1334 patients both of paediatric and adult age. Aetiology remains unexplained in about half of the cases, representing the so-called 'cryptogenic NORSE'. Amongst adult patients without cryptogenic NORSE, the most often identified cause is autoimmune encephalitis, either non-paraneoplastic or paraneoplastic. Infections are the prevalent aetiology of paediatric non-cryptogenic NORSE. Genetic and congenital disorders can have a causative role in NORSE, and toxic, vascular and degenerative conditions have also been described. CONCLUSIONS: Far from being a unitary condition, NORSE is a heterogeneous and clinically challenging presentation. The development and dissemination of protocols and guidelines to standardize diagnostic work-up and guide therapeutic approaches should be implemented. Global cooperation and multicentre research represent priorities to improve the understanding of NORSE.


Subject(s)
Drug Resistant Epilepsy , Encephalitis , Epileptic Syndromes , Status Epilepticus , Adult , Child , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/etiology , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/therapy , Encephalitis/complications , Epileptic Syndromes/complications , Epileptic Syndromes/diagnosis , Epileptic Syndromes/therapy , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/etiology , Status Epilepticus/therapy
6.
Am J Emerg Med ; 54: 328.e1-328.e2, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514111

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Status Epilepticus is the most common non-traumatic neurologic emergency in childhood. Current algorithms prioritize the use of benzodiazepines as first line treatment followed by Levetiracetam or Valproic Acid, possibly Fosphenytoin and eventually high dose Propofol and intubation. CASE REPORT: A 9-month old girl was brought to the emergency department with a continuous seizure involving the right upper and lower extremity for 45 min prior to arrival. Patient received a dose of rectal Diazepam, intramuscular Midazolam, 2 doses of Lorazepam, Levetiracetam, Fosphenytoin and 2 additional doses of Lorazepam. The seizure remained refractory and generalized. In anticipation of intubation, and because of its action on the NMDA receptor, Ketamine (1 mg/kg IV) was administered. The clonic movements and eye deviations stopped. Patient was intubated for airway protection, sedated with Propofol, then admitted to the PICU. EEG showed no evidence of a seizure pattern. Labs (CBC, CMP, COVID) were unremarkable except for WBC 24.5, blood glucose of 346 and CO2 of 17 with normal anion gap. Urinalysis showed a urinary tract infection. Patient was at her baseline on 1 week post-discharge re-evaluation. Ketamine theoretically may abort seizures through blockade of NMDA receptors which are unregulated in status epilepticus. To date, no randomized controlled trials have been reported. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Ketamine may have a role in treating status epilepticus. It may be considered for induction for rapid sequence intubation and possibly as a third or fourth line agent in refractory cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ketamine , Propofol , Status Epilepticus , Aftercare , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Infant , Ketamine/adverse effects , Levetiracetam , Lorazepam/therapeutic use , Patient Discharge , Propofol/therapeutic use , Seizures/drug therapy , Status Epilepticus/drug therapy
7.
Acta Biomed ; 92(5): e2021208, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504536

ABSTRACT

Respiratory involvement is the most common clinical manifestation of COVID-19, but neurological symptoms and complications are increasingly being recognized. Seizures and status epilepticus (SE) have been described as possible consequences of hypoxia and metabolic derangements during SARS-CoV-2 infection, direct viral invasion of the central nervous system, or as para or post-infectious complications. Single episodes of SE have been described, occurring during the acute phase of COVID-19 or once the patients have been recovered. Herein, we present the case of a patient with a positive serology test for SARS-CoV-2 (IgG+, IgM-) and recurrent SE occurring within 36 days. Diagnostic work-up ruled out other known causes of SE. A post-COVID-19 infectious inflammatory/immune response is hypothesized as the possible trigger of SE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Serologic Tests , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/etiology
10.
Seizure ; 92: 89-93, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373266

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the rate, characteristics, risk factors, and prognosis of children presenting with seizures as the main symptom of acute COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). METHODS: We conducted a systematic retrospective study to identify all children who presented to the emergency departments of a tertiary academic medical center between March 1st and December 31st 2020 and had a SARS-CoV-2 infection based on RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) from nasopharyngeal swab. Clinical and demographic data were extracted from the electronic medical records and reviewed. RESULTS: Total of 175 children were diagnosed with acute SARS-CoV-2 infection in the emergency departments during the study period. Of those, 11 presented with seizures. Age ranged from six months to 17 years and 4 were girls. Five presented with status epilepticus and responded to loading doses of anti-seizure medications. Six had fever. Seven had prior history of neurological disorder. Full recovery was the rule. SIGNIFICANCE: Unlike in adults, seizures occur early and may be the main manifestation of acute COVID-19 in children. Seizures, including status epilepticus, may occur without fever even in children with no history of epilepsy and are not associated with severe disease. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis thus infection control measures can be taken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/drug therapy , Seizures/epidemiology
11.
Neurol Sci ; 43(3): 2015-2020, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358105

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological manifestations of COVID-19 infection are well recognized. Seizures and status epilepticus (SE) have been reported as possible manifestations and/or complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection at different disease stages, but few data are known about the type, severity, treatment response, and recurrence. METHODS: Single-center retrospective case series. RESULTS: This case series describes four COVID-19-positive patients admitted to an Italian University Hospital, who developed status epilepticus during the active phase of disease, independently from the severity of respiratory symptoms. Two of them presented a relapse after resolution of the acute viral infection, a feature that has not been previously reported. CONCLUSIONS: Although a possible association between SE and COVID-19 has been reported, the exact etiopathogenetic mechanism remains still not understood. Our series adds new insights to shed further light on this controversial issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/etiology
12.
Neuropediatrics ; 52(4): 242-251, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287846

ABSTRACT

Neurological emergencies account for about one-third of the highest severity codes attributed in emergency pediatric departments. About 75% of children with acute neurological symptoms presents with seizures, headache, or other paroxysmal events. Life-threatening conditions involve a minor proportion of patients (e.g., less than 15% of children with headache and less than 5% of children with febrile seizures). This review highlights updated insights about clinical features, diagnostic workup, and therapeutic management of pediatric neurological emergencies. Particularly, details will be provided about the most recent insights about headache, febrile seizures, status epilepticus, altered levels of consciousness, acute motor impairment, acute movement disorders, and functional disorders, as well as the role of diagnostic tools (e.g., neuroimaging, lumbar puncture, and electroencephalography), in the emergency setting. Moreover, the impact of the current novel coronavirus disease2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the evaluation of pediatric neurologic emergencies will also be analyzed.


Subject(s)
Acute Disease , Headache/diagnosis , Seizures/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Child , Emergencies , Headache/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Seizures/therapy , Status Epilepticus/therapy
13.
J Neuroimmunol ; 357: 577629, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260802

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus is a novel human pathogen causing fulminant respiratory syndrome (COVID-19). Developing an effective and reliable vaccine was emergently pursued to control the dramatic spread of the global pandemic. The standard stages for vaccine development were unprecedentedly accelerated over a few months. We report a case of new-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) after receiving the first dose of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. We attribute the occurrence of NORSE to the vaccine due to the temporal relationship and the lack of risk factors for epilepsy in the patient. This report adds to the literature a possible rare side effect of a COVID-19 vaccine and contributes to the extremely limited literature on potential neurological side effects of viral vector vaccines. Healthcare providers should be aware of the possibility of post-vaccination epilepsy. The patient had recurrent seizures that were refractory to conventional antiepileptic drug therapy with a dramatic response to immunotherapy with pulse steroids and plasmapheresis. This likely reflects an underlying autoimmune mechanism in the genesis of post-vaccination generalized seizures without fever. Further research is needed to probe and study the exact mechanism at a more molecular level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/chemically induced , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/diagnostic imaging , Status Epilepticus/chemically induced , Status Epilepticus/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/therapy , Female , Humans , Status Epilepticus/therapy
14.
Seizure ; 89: 99-106, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230773

ABSTRACT

We reviewed the literature on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies in patients who had a seizure in the setting of COVID-19 infection to evaluate for evidence of viral neuroinvasion. We performed a systematic review of Medline and Embase to identify publications that reported one or more patients with COVID-19 who had a seizure and had CSF testing preformed. The search ranged from December 1st 2019 to November 18th 2020. We identified 56 publications which described 69 unique patients who met our inclusion criteria. Of the 54 patients whose past medical history was provided, 2 (4%) had epilepsy and 1 (2%) had a prior seizure in the setting of hyperglycemia, but the remaining 51 (94%) had no history of seizures. Seizure was the initial symptom of COVID-19 for 15 (22%) patients. There were 26 (40%) patients who developed status epilepticus. SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing was performed in the CSF for 45 patients; 6 (13%) had a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR, only 1 (17%) of whom had status epilepticus. The cycle thresholds were not reported. Evaluation for CSF SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (directly or indirectly, via testing for CSF oligoclonal bands or immunoglobulins) was performed in 26 patients, only 2 (8%) of whom had evidence of intrathecal antibody synthesis. Of the 11 patients who had CSF autoimmune antibody panels tested, 1 had NMDA antibodies and 1 had Caspr-2 antibodies. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of patients with seizures who have COVID-19 is uncommon. Our review suggests that seizures in this patient population are not likely due to direct viral invasion of the brain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
16.
Neurol Sci ; 42(7): 2611-2614, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188106

ABSTRACT

Amongst the neurologic complications of COVID-19 disease, very few reports have shown the presence of the virus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Seizure and rarely status epilepticus can be associated with COVID-19 disease. Here we present a 73-year-old male with prior history of stroke who has never experienced seizure before. He had no systemic presentation of COVID-19 disease. The presenting symptoms were two consecutive generalized tonic-clonic seizures that after initial resolution turned into a nonconvulsive status epilepticus despite antiepileptic treatment (a presentation similar to NORSE (new-onset refractory status epilepticus)). There was no new lesion in the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CSF analysis only showed an increased protein levels and positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of 2019-nCoV. Patient recovered partially after anesthetic, IVIG, steroid, and remdesivir. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a refractory status epilepticus with the presence of SARS-CoV-2 ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the CSF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Aged , Humans , Male , RNA , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/complications , Seizures/diagnostic imaging , Seizures/drug therapy , Status Epilepticus/complications , Status Epilepticus/diagnostic imaging , Status Epilepticus/drug therapy
17.
Epilepsy Behav ; 118: 107887, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142315

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the SARS-CoV-2 infection-related coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) a pandemic. During the first and second waves of the pandemic spread, there have been several reports of COVID-19-associated neurological manifestations, including acute seizures and status epilepticus (SE). In this systematic review, we summarized the available data on clinical features, diagnosis, and therapy of COVID-19-related SE. METHODS: We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify data on demographics, clinical, neurophysiological, and neuroradiological data of patients with COVID-19-related SE. We used regression models (linear or logistic) with a stepwise forward method to identify features associated with mortality or severity of SE. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles were included with a total of 47 cases of SE associated with COVID-19. Age, time between the acute respiratory phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection and SE onset, and hospitalization correlated with a higher SE severity as assessed by quantitative validated scales. CONCLUSIONS: SE can be a neurological manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although a possible association between SE and COVID-19 has been reported, the exact mechanisms are still not fully understood. Systemic inflammatory syndrome due to cytokine release could play a role in COVID-19-related SE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/epidemiology , Status Epilepticus/etiology
18.
J Neurol ; 268(10): 3569-3573, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130772

ABSTRACT

Neurological manifestations may be common in COVID-19 patients. They may include several syndromes, such as a suggested autoimmune abnormal response, which may result in encephalitis and new-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE). Quickly recognizing such cases and starting the most appropriate therapy is mandatory due to the related rapid worsening and bad outcomes. This case series describes two adult patients admitted to the university hospital and positive to novel coronavirus 2019 (SARS-CoV-2) infection who developed drug-resistant status epilepticus. Both patients underwent early electroencephalography (EEG) assessment, which showed a pathological EEG pattern characterized by general slowing, rhythmic activity and continuous epileptic paroxysmal activity. A suspected autoimmune etiology, potentially triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection, encouraged a rapid work-up for a possible autoimmune encephalitis diagnosis. Therapeutic approach included the administration of 0.4 g/kg intravenous immunoglobulin, which resulted in a complete resolution of seizures after 5 and after 10 days, respectively, without adverse effects and followed by a normalization of the EEG patterns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Adult , Electroencephalography , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures , Status Epilepticus/drug therapy
19.
Epilepsy Behav ; 118: 107923, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has a myriad of neurological manifestations and its effects on the nervous system are increasingly recognized. Seizures and status epilepticus (SE) are reported in the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), both new onset and worsening of existing epilepsy; however, the exact prevalence is still unknown. The primary aim of this study was to correlate the presence of seizures, status epilepticus, and specific critical care EEG patterns with patient functional outcomes in those with COVID-19. METHODS: This is a retrospective, multicenter cohort of COVID-19-positive patients in Southeast Michigan who underwent electroencephalography (EEG) from March 12th through May 15th, 2020. All patients had confirmed nasopharyngeal PCR for COVID-19. EEG patterns were characterized per 2012 ACNS critical care EEG terminology. Clinical and demographic variables were collected by medical chart review. Outcomes were divided into recovered, recovered with disability, or deceased. RESULTS: Out of the total of 4100 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 110 patients (2.68%) had EEG during their hospitalization; 64% were male, 67% were African American with mean age of 63 years (range 20-87). The majority (70%) had severe COVID-19, were intubated, or had multi-organ failure. The median length of hospitalization was 26.5 days (IQR = 15 to 44 days). During hospitalization, of the patients who had EEG, 21.8% had new-onset seizure including 7% with status epilepticus, majority (87.5%) with no prior epilepsy. Forty-nine (45%) patients died in the hospital, 46 (42%) recovered but maintained a disability and 15 (14%) recovered without a disability. The EEG findings associated with outcomes were background slowing/attenuation (recovered 60% vs recovered/disabled 96% vs died 96%, p < 0.001) and normal (recovered 27% vs recovered/disabled 0% vs died 1%, p < 0.001). However, these findings were no longer significant after adjusting for severity of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: In this large multicenter study from Southeast Michigan, one of the early COVID-19 epicenters in the US, none of the EEG findings were significantly correlated with outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Although seizures and status epilepticus could be encountered in COVID-19, the occurrence did not correlate with the patients' functional outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Critical Illness , Electroencephalography , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures , Young Adult
20.
Seizure ; 83: 1-4, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023745

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Our objective is to describe the most prevalent electroencephalographic findings in COVID-19 hospitalized patients, and to determine possible predictors of mortality including EEG and clinical variables. METHODS: A multicentric prospective observational study in patients with COVID-19 requiring EEG during hospitalization. RESULTS: We found 94 EEG from 62 patients (55 % men, mean age 59.7 ± 17.8 years) were analyzed. Most frequent comorbidity was cardiac (52 %), followed by metabolic (45 %) and CNS disease (39 %). Patients required ICU management by 60 %, with a mortality of 27 % in the whole cohort. The most frequent EEG finding was generalized continuous slow-wave activity (66 %). Epileptic activity was observed in 19 % including non-convulsive status epilepticus, seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges. Periodic patterns were observed in 3 patients (3.2 %). Multivariate analysis found that cancer comorbidity and requiring an EEG during the third week of evolution portended a higher risk of mortality CONCLUSION: We observed that the most prevalent EEG finding in this cohort was generalized continuous slow-wave activity, while epileptic activity was observed in less than 20 % of the cases. Mortality risk factors were comorbidity with cancer and requiring an EEG during the third week of evolution, possibly related to the hyperinflammatory state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Electroencephalography , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Seizures/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Electroencephalography/methods , Epilepsy/physiopathology , Epilepsy/virology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Seizures/virology , Status Epilepticus/mortality , Status Epilepticus/physiopathology , Status Epilepticus/virology
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