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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 59, 2021 Jan 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1031065

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 caused some worries among pregnant women. Worries during pregnancy can affect women's well-being. We investigated worry and well-being and associated factors among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 484 pregnant women using an online questionnaire. Sampling was performed in a period between May 5 and Aug 5, 2020. Inclusion criteria were having a single healthy fetus and having no significant psychological disorder. We collected the data using the Persian versions of the World Health Organization's Well-Being Index (WHO-5 Well-Being Index) and the Cambridge Worry Scale. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of women's worry and well-being. RESULTS: The mean total scores of the WHO-5 Well-Being Index and the percentage of WHO-5 score < 50 were 64.9 ± 29.0 and 24.4%, respectively. Predictors of women's worry are the increased level of fear of COVID-19 (OR = 6.40, p <  0.001), a low family income (OR = 3.41, p <  0.001), employment status (OR = 1.86, p = 0.019), nulliparity (OR = 1.68, p = 0.024), having a COVID-19 infected person among relatives (OR = 2.45, p = 0.036), having a history of abortion (OR = 1.86, p = 0.012), having participated in the study after the first wave of COVID-19 outbreak (OR = 2.328, p = 0.003), and women's age < 30 year (OR = 2.11, p = 0.002). Predictors of low level of well-being in pregnant women are worry about their own health and relationships (OR = 1.789, p = .017), worry about fetus health (OR = 1.946, p = 0.009), and having at least one infected person with COVID-19 among relatives (OR = 2.135, p = 0.036). CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of women experiencing a low well-being state was relatively high. This result is worthy of attention by health care providers and policy makers. Providing care and support to pregnant women should have high priority during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; : 102064, 2021 Jan 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030911

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Data about obstetric complications of maternal infection by SARS-CoV-2 remain sparse. CASE: A 40-year-old pregnant woman, gravida 3 para 1 with no previous obstetric complications, presented a late miscarriage at 16 weeks of gestation on day 9 of COVID-19 disease. The results of her nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2, tested the same day, were negative, but the placenta was infected by SARS-CoV-2 and serology was positive 11 days later. No other obstetric or infectious cause was found to explain this outcome. CONCLUSION: This case strongly suggests that SARS-CoV-2 may lead to a late miscarriage.

3.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 2021 Jan 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030732

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of the initial ASRM COVID-19 recommendations for infertility treatment held by women's health providers within varying subspecialties, as well as their attitudes toward pregnancy and fertility during this time. METHODS: An electronic survey was sent to all women's healthcare providers, including physicians, mid-level providers and nurses, in all subspecialties of obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) at a large tertiary care university-affiliated hospital. RESULTS: Of the 278 eligible providers, the survey response rate was 45% (n = 127). Participants represented 8 Ob/Gyn subspecialties and all professional levels. Participants age 18-30 years were significantly more likely to feel that women should have access to infertility treatment despite the burden level of COVID-19 in respective community/states (p = 0.0058). Participants within the subspecialties of general Ob/Gyn, maternal foetal medicine and gynecologic oncology were significantly more likely to disagree that all women should refrain from planned conception during the COVID-19 pandemic, in comparison to those in urogynecology and reproductive endocrinology and infertility (p = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Considering the immediate and unknown long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fertility care delivery, a better understanding of perceptions regarding infertility management during this time is important. Our study shows overall support for the initial ASRM recommendations, representing a wide spectrum of women's health providers.

4.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(3): 763-767, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030363

RESUMEN

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and is an emerging disease. There has been a rapid increase in cases and deaths since it was identified in Wuhan, China, in early December 2019, with over 4,000,000 cases of COVID-19 including at least 250,000 deaths worldwide as of May 2020. However, limited data about the clinical characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 have been reported. Given the maternal physiologic and immune function changes during pregnancy, pregnant women may be at a higher risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and developing more complicated clinical events. Information on severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) may provide insights into the effects of COVID-19's during pregnancy. Even though SARS and MERS have been associated with miscarriage, intrauterine death, fetal growth restriction and high case fatality rates, the clinical course of COVID-19 pneumonia in pregnant women has been reported to be similar to that in non-pregnant women. In addition, pregnant women do not appear to be at a higher risk of catching COVID-19 or suffering from more severe disease than other adults of similar age. Moreover, there is currently no evidence that the virus can be transmitted to the fetus during pregnancy or during childbirth. Babies and young children are also known to only experience mild forms of COVID-19. The aims of this systematic review were to summarize the possible symptoms, treatments, and pregnancy outcomes of women infected with COVID-19 during pregnancy.

5.
Sex Med ; 9(1): 100290, 2020 Dec 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029905

RESUMEN

AIM: Cancellation of university classes during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic challenges teaching inperson sexual history-taking skills to medical, physician assistant, and nursing students. We used commercial online electronic services for medical students to learn sexual history-taking skills. METHODS: A total of 174 medical students viewed a lecture on sexual history taking and the PLISSIT model (Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestion, Intensive Therapy) and were then randomized into dyads. They arranged a time to meet online on Zoom with their partner, chose a simple sexual history case-history (male or female) from a small selection, and recorded the 5- to 6-minute sexual history within a 1-week time frame. Each student played a "provider" or "patient" and then switched roles with a new case. One of the course tutors, all sexual health practitioners, downloaded 10 videos randomly assigned to them asynchronously and viewed and commented on the interaction of each "provider" along with comments on what to improve in the sexual history. 2 weeks later after the remainder of the lectures in the course, a second, more complex set of 8 cases were provided, so students could move at their comfort pace and choose 1. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Students were required to make 1 online post and 1 comment on another student's post for each case, on the experience, and associated issues arising, positive or negative. All comments were downloaded and analyzed by theme. RESULTS: Major themes included developing comfort in using sexual language, using simpler sexual terms suitable for patients, feeling confidence and mastery, excitement using technology developing clinical skills, surprise watching their performances and body language, observation of how they appeared to the "patient," organizing sexual histories and incorporating PLISSIT model, ability to ask about context and relationships, and seeing the exercise as building on existing clinical skills training. Some expressed anxiety and nervousness, which by the second case had largely or completely dissipated. CONCLUSION: A readily replicable, secure, cheap cloud-based model to integrate sexual history training asynchronously was provided, with tutors' comments, and student skills development, and performance evaluated. MW Ross, N Newstrom, E Coleman. Teaching Sexual History Taking in Health Care Using Online Technology: A PLISSIT-Plus Zoom Approach During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Shutdown. Sex Med 2020;XX:XXX-XXX.

6.
Acta Paediatr ; 2021 Jan 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029314

RESUMEN

Although COVID-19 tends to affect older people more severely, women of reproductive age are not spared. Based on perinatal COVID-19 data we express concerns about theoretical adverse consequences particularly to the offspring, in the framework of non-communicable diseases, which develop slowly across the life-course. The trajectory of risk commences early, in adolescence and the pre/peri-conceptional period to the first years of life.

8.
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can ; 40(11-12): 342-349, 2020 12 09.
Artículo en Inglés, Francés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028502

RESUMEN

As the effects of COVID-19 have been unfolding, growing attention has been paid to the intersection of COVID-19 and substance use and the related harms. However, there are few theories and little empirical evidence to guide investigations in this area. To advance this emerging area of inquiry, we present a conceptual model that synthesizes evidence, information and knowledge on substance use and related harms in the context of the pandemic. The conceptual model offers a visual representation of the connections between the pandemic and substance use and related harms, and can be used to identify areas for future research.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Modelos Teóricos , Pandemias , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/complicaciones , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Adaptación Psicológica , /transmisión , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Salud Mental , Servicios de Salud Mental , Factores de Riesgo , Estigma Social , Apoyo Social , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/terapia
9.
Menopause ; Publish Ahead of Print2021 Jan 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028141

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the rates of COVID-19 infection and death in women versus men differ with age. METHODS: From data provided by the Italian National Institute of Statistics, we calculated the respective proportions of women among COVID-infected versus noninfected populations and male versus female infection and death rates, stratifying the results into 10-year age groups. RESULTS: The prevalence of COVID-19 infection was 3.6% higher in women than in the general population from 20 to 59 years of age, then decreased to -13.3% below that of the general population between 60 and 89 years of age. Death rates among infected women showed the opposite age-related trend. In infected women, the mortality rate was -77.4% lower than that of men aged 20 to 59 years. Between 60 and 89 years of age, the difference in women decreases to -34.5% below that of men. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate opposing age-related trends among women in infection and death rates due to COVID-19. Further studies are needed to examine the contribution of the phases of the female reproductive cycle to the observed variations.

10.
Seminars in Perinatology ; 44:7, 2020.
Artículo | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1028640

RESUMEN

The rapid rise of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases led the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) to recommend immediate cessation of all new fertility treatment cycles on March 17, 2020 Controversial from the start, providers and patients expressed their opposition through online petitions, surveys, and other forums While the impact of a delay in access to reproductive care is unknown, previous studies are reassuring that a delay in the timespan of months may not affect clinical outcomes However, dropout from care during this pandemic remains a serious concern Effective therapies against the virus and a vaccine are not on the immediate horizon Accepting COVID-19 will likely be a part of our lives for the near future necessitates the modification of fertility protocols to keep patients, providers, and staff as safe as possible We believe fertility treatment is an urgent, essential service that can be performed safely and responsibly during this pandemic

11.
Mathematical Biology and Bioinformatics ; 15(2):338-356, 2020.
Artículo | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1027712

RESUMEN

An incidence curve of acute respiratory infections in Moscow hasthree picks between September and April and reaches its maximum in January-February The emergence of new strains of influenza A could account for onlyone pick a year The most cases of common cold are caused by ubiquitous lowpathogenic viruses In order to simulate weekly fluctuation of incidence rate ofacute respiratory illnesses we developed an agent-based model It contains 10 millions agents with such attributes as sex, age, social status, levels of specific immune memory and lists of contacts Each agent can contact with members of its household, colleagues or classmates Through such contacts susceptible agent can be infected with one of seven circulating respiratory viruses Viruses differ in their immunologic properties and assume to present influenza A virus, influenza B virus, parainfluenza, adenovirus, coronavirus, rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus The rate of transmission depends on duration of contact, vulnerability of susceptible agent, infectivity of infected agent and air temperature Proposed network of social interactions proved to be sufficiently detailed as it provided good fitting for observed incidence rate including periods of school holidays and winter public holidays Additionally, the estimates of basic reproductive rate for the viruses confirm that all these viruses except new strains of influenza A are relatively harmless and unable to cause significant growth of acute respiratory infections morbidity © 2020 All Rights Reserved

12.
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum ; 30(4):38-46, 2020.
Artículo | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1027587

RESUMEN

Aim: To monitor the impact of the rst wave of the Covid-19 pandemic on use of maternal and reproductive health services, and maternal mortality Compared with the second quarter of 2019, but in many provinces there were discrepancies between DHIS and PPIP data so national still birth data is not presented in this report

13.
Gender & Behaviour ; 18(4):16974-16987, 2020.
Artículo | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1027566

RESUMEN

While some tend to conceived GBV as either violence against the women, and children or emphasized it (Government Communication and Information System (2017;South African Human Rights Commission, 2018), interactions eldis (2015) recognizes not only men, women, boys, girls and children, but also sexual orientation as there is a transition of sexuality amongst these groups [ ]the "heteronormative gender roles and identities - lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, queer and intersex (LGBTQI+) - is of critical concern in South Africa" in conceptualizing gender-based violence (Government Communication and Information System, 2017:1) [ ]men, women and people that transit genders in South Africa are impacted by violence in multiple and intersecting ways" (interactions eldis, 2015:1) [ ]GBV could be described as a term that is used generally to denote violent behaviour as a result of a person gender's normative or attached role expectations and attendant power relations that exist in a society, which is usually unequal amongst genders (KPMG Human and Social Services, 2014;Bloom cited in Saferspaces, 2017) At the root are (i) power and (ii) groups (Wathen, 2019), i e the power (political, economic, physical, etc) that a group or its members wield, and how it is exercised over another group and its members [ ]the configuration of the society in terms of the structural pattern of gender roles, cultural norms, power relations amongst genders and societal expectations in these arrangements are sustained and reinforced by historical antecedents The South African government has enacted and established the following legislations and institutions to tackle the menace: the Criminal Law Amendment (sexual and Related Matters) Act & Sexual and Domestic Violence Protocol for Magistrates' Court, Protection from Harassment Act, Domestic Violence Act & Guidelines for the Implementation of the Domestic Violence Act for the Magistrates, Children's Amendment Act, Gender Equality Bill, Commission on Gender Equality, Employment Equality Act, the Gender-Based Violence National Command Centre (Government Communication and Information System (2017)

14.
BMJ Sex Reprod Health ; 47(1): 67-68, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027136
15.
Andrologia ; : e13971, 2021 Jan 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027007

RESUMEN

Studies have shown that healthcare professionals struggling with epidemics develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. The aim of this study is to show how often and severely erectile dysfunction, one of the components of post-traumatic stress disorder, is seen among healthcare professionals during COVID-19 outbreak. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and the Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) were applied to 159 male healthcare professionals working in COVID-19 units and a control group of 200 people. Healthcare professional group was divided into subgroups according to occupation (physician, nurse), age-group (18-25, 26-30, >30), marital status and unit of work (Suspected Patient Area, Diagnosed Patient Area). Both stress disorder and erectile dysfunction were seen at higher rates in healthcare professionals group (p < .001). The median IIEF-5 scores of nurses, married subjects and those working in the Diagnosed Patient Area, were found to be higher (p < .001, p = .014, p = .011 respectively). During the COVID-19 outbreak, healthcare professionals are exposed to psychological trauma and their sexual function may be negatively affected. The measures to be taken are important to estimate which groups are more affected.

16.
Hum Fertil (Camb) ; : 1-6, 2021 Jan 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1026881

RESUMEN

Men show higher vulnerability to severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (COVID-19) and present with depleted testosterone levels. Reports pertaining to high luteinizing hormone (LH), while diminished levels of in COVID-19 patients negate the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis mediated lowering of testosterone. Although not evidenced, high testicular expression of angiotensin-converting enzymes-2 (ACE2), that aids viral entry into cells, may suggest direct viral-testicular invasion. However, secondary inflammation and oxidative stress (OS), owing to SARS-CoV-2 infection, are more likely to impair steroidogenesis. Moreover, blockage of ACE2 aided angiotensin II into angiotensin (1-7) conversion may also affect testosterone synthesis. SARS-CoV-2, by mimicking adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH) hormones, may trigger host antibodies against the ACTH molecules to suppress host stress response. This commentary concisely presents the possible mechanisms by which SARS-CoV-2 infection may affect testosterone levels, which possibly result in compromised male reproductive health.

17.
J Homosex ; : 1-16, 2021 Jan 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1026860

RESUMEN

Sexual minority women (SMW; e.g., lesbian, bisexual, queer) are at increased risk for heavy/hazardous drinking and marijuana use, which may be exacerbated by stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to mitigate its spread (e.g., sheltering at home). To explore their experiences and perceptions of alcohol and marijuana use in the context of COVID-19, qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of 16 SMW from a longitudinal study who previously reported being at least moderate drinkers to explore their experiences and perceptions of alcohol and marijuana use during the pandemic. We used descriptive phenomenological analysis to explore data from the interviews. Participants described how their alcohol/marijuana use intersected with the complex and changing context of the pandemic, revealing four themes: 1) losing and creating routine; 2) seeking recreation and relief; 3) connecting, reconnecting, and disconnecting; and 4) monitoring alcohol and marijuana use boundaries. Findings highlight the importance of fostering community supports and possible interventions informed by the experiences of SMW.

18.
J Homosex ; : 1-15, 2021 Jan 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1026859

RESUMEN

This special issue on the impacts of COVID-19 on LGBTQ+ health and well-being reports findings from nine articles with varied study designs, including data from multiple countries and all segments of LGBTQ+ communities. Key findings included the observation that pre-COVID mental health disparities predispose LGBTQ+ people to poorer outcomes; that technological communication aids are essential in maintaining some sense of community; and that substance use is perceived by sexual minority women as a means of coping with fears, stress, loneliness, and boredom. Studies in this special issue also document that community support is still a critical need, particularly among those who are sheltering at home with families of origin. Findings underscore the importance of addressing structural inequities, including advocating for rights; providing financial support for LGBTQ+ community organizations and networks; ensuring access to competent and affirming healthcare; and including vulnerable communities in disaster response and planning.

19.
Sex Med ; : 100292, 2020 Dec 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1025781

RESUMEN

Introduction: COVID-19 pandemic caused unprecedented restrictions in outpatient services and surgical practices in urology as in other medical branches as well as in all areas of life. Aim: To investigate whether there have been variations in the presentations of male patients with sexual and reproductive health problems to the outpatient urology clinics during the COVID-19 pandemic and to understand the underlying factors for these variations, if any. Methods: Male patients aged ≥18 years who presented to the outpatient urology clinics in 12 centers across Turkey from February 1, 2020 to June 1, 2020 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: those who presented to the outpatient clinic from February 1, 2020 to March 11, 2020 comprised the "pre-COVID-19 pandemic period" group, whereas those who presented to the outpatient clinic from March 12, 2020 to June 1, 2020 comprised the "COVID-19 pandemic period" group and compared with each other. Main Outcome Measures: Number and diagnose of patients presented to urology outpatient clinics. Results: Andrological problems were detected in 721 of 4,955 male patients included in the study. During the COVID-19 pandemic period, there was a significant increase in andrological diagnosis in these patients compared with the pre-COVID-19 pandemic period [n=293 (17%) vs. n=428 (13.2%), p<0.001, respectively]. Similarly, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of patients diagnosed with male reproductive or sexual health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic period [n=107 (6.2%) vs. n=149 (4.6%), p=0.016 and n=186 (10.8%) vs. n=279 (8.6%), p=0.013, respectively]. The number of patients diagnosed with erectile dysfunction during the pandemic was also significantly higher than the pre-COVID-19 pandemic period [n=150 (8.7%) vs. n=214 (6.6%), p=0.008]. Conclusion: Presentations to the outpatient urology clinics due to andrological problems markedly increased during the pandemic period. Although these problems are of multifactorial origin, psychogenic factors are also considered to significantly trigger these problems.

20.
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health ; 47(1):e1, 2021.
Artículo | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1027138

RESUMEN

BSACP serves its members by providing a forum for professional development and networking, as well as by raising the profile of the specialty and improving understanding amongst those responsible for abortion-related policy, guidance, commissioning, regulation and training 2 Utility of a routine ultrasound for detection of ectopic pregnancies amongst women requesting abortion: a retrospective review Clara I Duncan1* John J Reynolds-Wright2 Sharon T Cameron2,3 1The Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 2MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 3Chalmers Centre for Sexual and Reproductive Health, Edinburgh, UK Background Routine ultrasound may be used in abortion services to determine gestational age and confirm an intrauterine pregnancy The value of routine ultrasound in excluding ectopic pregnancy in symptom-free women without significant risk factors is questionable as it may aid detection of some cases but may give false reassurance that a pregnancy is intrauterine 3 Acceptability of early medical abortion delivered by telemedicine – preliminary data from an NHS community abortion service John Reynolds-Wright1* Anne Johnstone2 Karen McCabe3 Claire Nicol4 Sharon Cameron5 1Clinical Research Fellow, MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 2Clinical Research Nurse, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 3Clinical Research Midwife, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 4Advanced Sexual and Reproductive Health Practitioner, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, UK 5Consultant Gynaecologist, NHS Lothian and Honorary Professor of Sexual and Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Introduction In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the NHS Lothian abortion service (based at the Chalmers Centre for Sexual and Reproductive Health, Edinburgh) transferred wholly to telemedicine delivery of abortion care Continuing to provide the majority of EMA care via telemedicine would appear to be an effective approach, appreciated by patients 4 Do medication abortion complications increase when mifepristone is available without regulations restricting practice? A population-based study using linked health administrative data from Canada Laura Schummers1,2* Elizabeth K Darling2,3 Anastasia Gayowsky2 Sheila Dunn4 Kimberlyn McGrai5 Michael Law5 Tracey-Lea Laba6 Wendy V Norman1,7 1Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada 2ICES McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 4Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 5School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada 6Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia 7Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK Objective In January 2017, mifepristone became available in Canada, where abortion has been fully decriminalised since 1988

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