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Risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection among farmworkers in Monterey County, California
Ana M Mora; Joseph A Lewnard; Katherine Kogut; Stephen Rauch; Norma Morga; Samantha Hernandez; Marcus P Yong; Karen Huen; Cynthia Chang; Nicholas P Jewell; Nina Holland; Eva Harris; Maximiliano Cuevas; Brenda Eskenazi.
  • Ana M Mora; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Joseph A Lewnard; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Katherine Kogut; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • Stephen Rauch; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • Norma Morga; Clinica de Salud del Valle de Salinas
  • Samantha Hernandez; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Marcus P Yong; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Karen Huen; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • Cynthia Chang; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Nicholas P Jewell; Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
  • Nina Holland; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Eva Harris; Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Maximiliano Cuevas; Clinica de Salud del Valle de Salinas
  • Brenda Eskenazi; Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
Preprint Dans Anglais | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21250963
Journal article
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ABSTRACT
ImportanceEssential workers in agriculture and food production have been severely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. ObjectiveTo identify risk factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 shedding and antibody response in farmworkers in California. DesignThis cross-sectional study collected survey data and determined current SARS-CoV-2 shedding and seropositivity among 1,107 farmworkers in Californias Salinas Valley from 16 July to 30 November 2020. SettingFarmworkers receiving transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) tests for SARS-CoV-2 infection at federally qualified community clinics and community sites were invited to participate in our study. ParticipantsIndividuals were eligible if they were not pregnant, [≥]18 years old, had conducted farm work since the pandemic started, and were proficient in English or Spanish. ExposuresSociodemographic, household, community, and workplace characteristics. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s)Current (as indicated by TMA positivity) and historical (as indicated by IgG seropositivity) SARS-CoV-2 infection. ResultsMost farmworkers enrolled in the study were born in Mexico, had primary school or lower levels of educational attainment, and were overweight or obese. Current SARS-CoV-2 shedding was associated in multivariable analyses with attained only primary or lower educational levels (RR=1.32; 95% CI 0.99-1.76), speaking an indigenous language at home (RR=1.30; 0.97-1.73), working in the fields (RR=1.60; 1.03-2.50), and exposure to known or suspected COVID-19 case at home (RR=2.98; 2.06-4.32) or in the workplace (RR=1.59; 1.18-2.14). Antibody detection was associated with residential exposures including living in crowded housing (RR=1.23; 0.98-1.53), with children (RR=1.40; 1.1-1.76) or unrelated roommates (RR=1.40; 1.19-1.64), and with a known or suspected COVID-19 case (RR=1.59; 1.13-2.24). Those who were obese (RR=1.65; 1.01-2.70) or diabetic (RR=1.31; 0.98-1.75) were also more likely to be seropositive. Farmworkers who lived in rural areas other than Greenfield (RR=0.58; 0.47-0.71), worked indoors (RR=0.68; 0.61-0.77), or whose employer provided them with information on how to protect themselves at work (RR=0.59; 0.40-0.86) had lower risk of prior infection. Conclusions and RelevanceOur findings suggest both residential and workplace exposures are contributing to SARS-CoV-2 infection among farmworkers in California. Urgent distribution of COVID-19 vaccines is warranted given this populations increased risk of infection and the essential nature of their work.
Texte intégral: Disponible Collection: Preprints Base de données: medRxiv langue: Anglais Année: 2021 Type de document: Preprint
Texte intégral: Disponible Collection: Preprints Base de données: medRxiv langue: Anglais Année: 2021 Type de document: Preprint