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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913827

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#There remains controversy about relationship between obesity and gastric cancer. We aimed to examine the association using obesity-persistence. @*Materials and Methods@#We analyzed a nationwide population-based cohort which underwent health check-up between 2009 and 2012. Among them, those who had annual examinations during the last 5 years were selected. Gastric cancer risk was compared between those without obesity during the 5 years (never-obesity group) and those with obesity diagnosis during the 5 years (non-persistent obesity group; persistent obesity group). @*Results@#Among 2,757,017 individuals, 13,441 developed gastric cancer after median 6.78 years of follow-up. Gastric cancer risk was the highest in persistent obesity group (incidence rate [IR], 0.89/1,000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 1.197; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.117 to 1.284), followed by non-persistent obesity group (IR, 0.83/1,000 person-years; HR, 1.113; 95% CI, 1.056 to 1.172) compared with never-obesity group. In subgroup analysis, this positive relationship was true among those < 65 years old and male. Among heavy-drinkers, the impact of obesity-persistence on the gastric cancer risk far increased (non-persistent obesity: HR, 1.297; 95% CI, 1.094 to 1.538; persistent obesity: HR, 1.351; 95% CI, 1.076 to 1.698). @*Conclusion@#Obesity-persistence is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer in a dose-response manner, especially among male < 65 years old. The risk raising effect was much stronger among heavy-drinkers.

2.
Gut and Liver ; : 465-473, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925016

ABSTRACT

Background/aims@#Contradictory findings on the association between cholecystectomy and cancer have been reported. We aimed to investigate the risk of all types of cancers or site-specific cancers in patients who underwent cholecystectomy using a nationwide dataset. @*Methods@#Subjects who underwent cholecystectomy from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2014, who were older than 20 years and who underwent an initial baseline health check-up within 2 years were enrolled. Those who were diagnosed with any type of cancer before the enrollment or within 1 year after enrollment were excluded. Ultimately, patients (n=123,295) who underwent cholecystectomy and age/sex matched population (n=123,295) were identified from the database of the Korean National Health Insurance Service. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cancer were estimated, and Cox regression analysis was performed. @*Results@#The incidence of cancer in the cholecystectomy group was 9.56 per 1,000 person-years and that in the control group was 7.95 per 1,000 person-years. Patients who underwent cholecystectomy showed an increased risk of total cancer (adjusted HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.24; p<0.001), particularly leukemia and malignancies of the colon, liver, pancreas, biliary tract, thyroid, pharynx, and oral cavity. In the subgroup analysis according to sex, the risk of developing cancers in the pancreas, biliary tract, thyroid, lungs and stomach was higher in men than in women. @*Conclusions@#Physicians should pay more attention to the possibility of the occurrence of secondary cancers among patients who undergo cholecystectomy.

3.
Gut and Liver ; : 723-731, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890770

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#This study examined the long-term outcomes of undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (UD EGC) with positive horizontal margins (HMs) after endoscopic resection (ER) and compared them between additional surgery and nonsurgical management. @*Methods@#From 2005 to 2015, a total of 1,124 patients with UD EGC underwent ER at 18 tertiary hospitals in Korea. Of them, 92 patients with positive HMs as the only noncurative factor (n=25) or with both positive HMs and tumor size >2 cm (n=67) were included. These patients underwent additional surgery (n=40), underwent additional endoscopic treatment (n=6), or were followed up without further treatment (n=46). @*Results@#No lymph node (LN) metastasis was found in patients who underwent additional surgery. During a median follow-up of 57.7 months (interquartile range, 27.6 to 68.8 months), no LN or distant metastases or gastric cancer-related deaths occurred in the overall cohort. At baseline, the residual cancer rate was 57.8% (26/45) after additional surgery or ER. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 33.6% among patients who were followed up without additional treatment. The 5-year overall survival rates were 95.0% and 87.8% after additional surgery and nonsurgical management (endoscopic treatment or close follow-up), respectively (log-rank p=0.224). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, nonsurgical management was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. @*Conclusions@#UD EGC with positive HMs after ER may have favorable long-term outcomes and a very low risk of LN metastasis. Nonsurgical management may be suggested as an alternative, particularly for patients with old age or chronic illness.

4.
Gut and Liver ; : 723-731, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898474

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#This study examined the long-term outcomes of undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (UD EGC) with positive horizontal margins (HMs) after endoscopic resection (ER) and compared them between additional surgery and nonsurgical management. @*Methods@#From 2005 to 2015, a total of 1,124 patients with UD EGC underwent ER at 18 tertiary hospitals in Korea. Of them, 92 patients with positive HMs as the only noncurative factor (n=25) or with both positive HMs and tumor size >2 cm (n=67) were included. These patients underwent additional surgery (n=40), underwent additional endoscopic treatment (n=6), or were followed up without further treatment (n=46). @*Results@#No lymph node (LN) metastasis was found in patients who underwent additional surgery. During a median follow-up of 57.7 months (interquartile range, 27.6 to 68.8 months), no LN or distant metastases or gastric cancer-related deaths occurred in the overall cohort. At baseline, the residual cancer rate was 57.8% (26/45) after additional surgery or ER. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 33.6% among patients who were followed up without additional treatment. The 5-year overall survival rates were 95.0% and 87.8% after additional surgery and nonsurgical management (endoscopic treatment or close follow-up), respectively (log-rank p=0.224). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, nonsurgical management was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. @*Conclusions@#UD EGC with positive HMs after ER may have favorable long-term outcomes and a very low risk of LN metastasis. Nonsurgical management may be suggested as an alternative, particularly for patients with old age or chronic illness.

5.
Gut and Liver ; : 571-580, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833185

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Epigenetic change is one of the mecha-nisms that regulates the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and is known to play a role in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. We aimed to evaluate the epigen-etic changes ofmiR-200a/b in H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis and restoration after eradication. @*Methods@#The expression and methylation levels of miR-200a/b were evaluated in gastric cancer (GC) cell lines, human gastric mu-cosa of H. pylori-negative and -positive controls, and H. pyloripositive GC patients. Next, the changes in the expression and methylation levels of miR-200a/b were compared between H. pylori-eradication and H. pylori-persistence groups at 6 months. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was conducted to investigate the miRNA expression levels, and MethyLight was performed to assess the meth-ylation levels. @*Results@#In the GC cell lines, the level ofmiR-200a/b methylation decreased and the level of expression increased after demethylation. In the human gastric mucosa, the miR-200a/b methylation levels increased in the following group order: H. pylori-negative control group, H. pylori-positive control group, and H. pylori-positive GC group. Conversely, the miR-200a/b expression levels decreased in the same order.In the H. pylori-persistence group, no significant changes were observed in the methylation and expression levels of miR-200a/b after 6 months, whereas the level of methyla-tion decreased and the level of expression of miR-200a/b increased significantly 6 months in the H. pylori-eradication group. @*Conclusions@#Epigenetic alterations ofmiR-200a/bmay be implicated in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogen-esis. This field defect for cancerization is suggested to be improved by H. pylori eradication.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endoscopic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis can contribute to risk stratification and thereby tailored screening for gastric cancer. We aimed to evaluate the effect of training on inter-observer agreement in diagnosis and grading of endoscopic atrophic gastritis (EAG) according to the level of endoscopists' experience. METHODS: Twelve endoscopists (six less-experienced and six experienced) participated in this prospective study. The training session consisted of 1) four interventions with two-week intervals, and 2) a follow-up period (two follow-up assessments without feedback). EAG was categorized as C1 to O3 according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification. Kappa statistics were used to calculate inter-observer agreement. RESULTS: At baseline, kappa indexes were 0.18 in the less-experienced group and 0.32 in the experienced group, respectively. After four interventions with feedback, the kappa index improved in both groups and was sustained during the follow-up period. Overall diagnostic yields of EAG were 43.1% ± 10.7% in pre-intervention and 46.8% ± 5.9% in post-intervention. Variability in the rate of diagnosis of EAG significantly decreased in the less-experienced group (r = 0.04, P = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Irrespective of experience level, inter-observer agreement for diagnosis and grading of EAG improved after training and remained stable after intervention.

8.
Gut and Liver ; : 133-141, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713723

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia due to Helicobacter pylori infection are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of H. pylori eradication on the progression of precancerous lesions to metachronous cancer after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC). METHODS: Patients who underwent endoscopic resection of EGC were retrospectively reviewed. Changes in precancerous lesions and development of metachronous cancer were compared according to H. pylori eradication and final infection status. RESULTS: In total, 565 patients were followed for over 5 years after endoscopic resection of EGC. The grade of atrophy on corpus was significantly lower in the H. pylori-eradicated group than in the persistent group during follow-up (p=0.029). In patients < 70 years of age, the cumulative incidence rate of metachronous cancer was significantly lower in the H. pylori-eradicated group than in the persistent group (p=0.018). Age was an independent risk factor for metachronous cancer development. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori eradication might prevent the development of metachronous cancer in patients < 70 years of age by delaying the progression of precancerous lesions after endoscopic resection of EGC.


Subject(s)
Atrophy , Follow-Up Studies , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Incidence , Metaplasia , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stomach Neoplasms
9.
Gut and Liver ; : 393-401, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Current guidelines recommend withholding antiplatelets for 5–7 days before high-risk endoscopic procedures. We investigated whether this reduces post-endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) bleeding. METHODS: Gastric ESD cases with antiplatelets were retorospectively reviewed. Withholding antiplatelets for 5–7 days before ESD was defined as cessation and 0–4 days as continuation. The rate and risk of post-ESD bleeding according to the types and cessation of antiplatelets were assessed. RESULTS: Among the 215 patients (117 adenoma and 98 early gastric cancer), 161 patients were on single (94 aspirin, 56 thienopyridine, and 11 other agents), 51 on dual, and 3 on triple antiplatelets. Post-ESD bleeding rates were 12.8% in aspirin users, 3.6% in thienopyridine, 27.5% in dual, 33.3% in triple therapy, and 9.7% in the cessation and 15.0% in the continuation group. Multiple antiplatelets (odds ratio [OR], 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 5.76) and specimen size ≥ 5.5 cm (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.04 to 7.73) were the risk of bleeding, while continuation of thienopyridine (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.05 to 1.09) and antiplatelets (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 0.68 to 4.94) did not increase the risk of bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Continuing thienopyridine and aspirin did not increase the risk of post-ESD. Multiple antiplatelet therapy and a large specimen size were independent risk factors of post-ESD bleeding.


Subject(s)
Adenoma , Aspirin , Hemorrhage , Humans , Risk Factors
10.
Gut and Liver ; : 58-66, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori eradication can reverse epigenetic silencing of microRNAs (miRNAs) which are associated with H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: We examined expression and promoter methylation of miR-34b/c, miR-133a, let-7a, and let-7i in gastric cancer cell line, before/after demethylation. Among them, epigenetically controlled miRNAs were identified. Their expression and promoter methylation was examined in human tissues of H. pylori-positive gastric cancer (T), H. pylori-positive gastritis (H), and H. pylori-negative controls (C). We also compared changes of miRNA expression and promoter methylation in H. pylori-positive patients who were endoscopically treated for early gastric cancer, between baseline and 1 year later according to eradication status. RESULTS: In gastric cancer cell line, miR-34b/c and miR-133a showed epigenetic silencing. In human tissues, miR-34b/c and miR-133a showed serial increase of promoter methylation in order of C, H, and T (all, p < 0.01), and the miR-133a expression showed serial decrease (C vs H, p=0.02; H vs T, p=0.01; C vs T, p < 0.01) while miR-34b and miR-34c expressions did not. H. pylori eradication induced decrease of methylation (p < 0.01) and increase of miR-133a expression (p=0.03), compared with noneradication group. CONCLUSIONS: This result suggests H. pylori eradication could reverse methylation-silencing of miR-133a which is involved in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.


Subject(s)
Carcinogenesis , Cell Line , Epigenomics , Gastritis , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Methylation , MicroRNAs , Stomach Neoplasms
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738959

ABSTRACT

Amyloidosis is a disease in which amyloid is abnormally accumulated in the tissue. The kidney and heart are the most commonly involved organs. Gastric involvement is relatively common in systemic disease; however, localized gastric amyloidosis is rare. Here, we report a case of localized gastric amyloidosis with two separate lesions. A 56-year-old woman underwent a health surveillance checkup without any noticeable symptoms. She was under medication for diabetes and dyslipidemia, and was otherwise healthy. On surveillance upper endoscopy, an irregularly shaped hyperemic elevated erosion at the gastric fundus and a 1.5-cm, yellowish subepithelial tumor-like lesion with intact overlying mucosa at the lesser curvature of the lower body of the stomach were detected. Endoscopic biopsy revealed submucosal eosinophilic material deposition in both lesions. Congo-red staining showed amyloid deposit appearing as a yellow-green birefringence under polarizing microscopy. Echocardiography, abdominal sonography, and colonoscopy revealed no abnormality. The patient was diagnosed as having localized gastric amyloidosis and is now undergoing regular follow-up without any treatment. Localized gastric amyloidosis is a rare disease that may mimic nonspecific gastritis or subepithelial tumor. However, endoscopic biopsy with appropriate staining may be diagnostic and thorough evaluation for systemic involvement is important.


Subject(s)
Amyloid , Amyloidosis , Biopsy , Birefringence , Colonoscopy , Dyslipidemias , Echocardiography , Endoscopy , Eosinophils , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Gastric Fundus , Gastritis , Heart , Humans , Kidney , Microscopy , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane , Plaque, Amyloid , Rare Diseases , Stomach
12.
Gut and Liver ; : 226-231, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-194966

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The resistance rate of Helicobacter pylori is gradually increasing. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication in peptic ulcer disease. METHODS: Between 2002 and 2014, 110 patients in 14 medical centers received levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer disease. Of these, 88 were included in the study; 21 were excluded because of lack of follow-up and one was excluded for poor compliance. Their eradication rates, treatment regimens and durations, and types of peptic ulcers were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall eradiation rate was 71.6%. The adherence rate was 80.0%. All except one received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, and levofloxacin. One received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, and clarithromycin, and the eradication was successful. Thirty-one were administered the therapy for 7 days, 25 for 10 days, and 32 for 14 days. No significant differences were observed in the eradication rates between the three groups (7-days, 80.6% vs 10-days, 64.0% vs 14-days, 68.8%, p=0.353). Additionally, no differences were found in the eradiation rates according to the type of peptic ulcer (gastric ulcer, 73.2% vs duodenal/gastroduodenal ulcer, 68.8%, p=0.655). CONCLUSIONS: Levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication showed efficacy similar to that of previously reported first/second-line therapies.


Subject(s)
Amoxicillin , Clarithromycin , Compliance , Follow-Up Studies , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Levofloxacin , Peptic Ulcer , Ulcer
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-103587

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Endoscopy
14.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-10156

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is an important risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. Although several studies have investigated the effect of Hp eradication on the development of metachronous neoplasm after endoscopic resection of the gastric dysplasia, the evidence is still insufficient to make a clear conclusion. The aims of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for the development of metachronous neoplasm after endoscopic resection of gastric dysplasia and to investigate the effect of Hp eradication. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2011, a total of 887 patients underwent endoscopic resection for gastric dysplasia. Among them, 521 patients who had undergone tests for Hp infection and been followed-up for at least one year were included in the final analyses. Of the 292 Hp-positive patients, 116 patients were successfully eradicated, while 176 failed or did not undergo eradication. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 59.1 months (range 12–125 months), metachronous neoplasm had developed in 63 patients (12.1%, dysplasia in 38, carcinoma in 25). In multivariate analyses, age ≥65 (hazard ratio [HR]=2.247, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.297–3.895), tumor size (HR=1.283, 95% CI 1.038–1.585), synchronous lesion (HR=2.341, 95% CI 1.244–4.405), family history of gastric cancer (HR=3.240, 95% CI 1.776–5.912), and smoking (HR=1.016, 95% CI 1.003–1.029) were risk factors for metachronous neoplasm after endoscopic resection of gastric dysplasia. However, Hp eradication was not associated with metachronous neoplasm (HR=0.641, 95% CI 0.297–1.384). CONCLUSIONS: Hp eradication was not shown to be associated with the development of metachronous cancer after endoscopic resection of gastric dysplasia.


Subject(s)
Carcinogenesis , Follow-Up Studies , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Multivariate Analysis , Neoplasms, Second Primary , Precancerous Conditions , Risk Factors , Smoke , Smoking , Stomach Neoplasms
15.
Gut and Liver ; : 612-619, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140059

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Atrophic gastritis is considered a premalignant lesion. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors for gastric tumorigenesis in underlying mucosal atrophy. METHODS: A total of 10,185 subjects who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between 2003 and 2004 were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. Follow-up endoscopy was performed between 2005 and 2014. Atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia were assessed by endoscopy using the Kimura-Takemoto classification. Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated based on serum immunoglobulin G antibody levels, the rapid urease test, or the urea breath test. RESULTS: Atrophic gastritis was confirmed in 3,714 patients at baseline; 2,144 patients were followed up for 6.9 years, and 1,138 exhibited increased atrophy. A total of 69 subjects were diagnosed with gastric neoplasm during follow-up (35 adenoma and 34 carcinoma). Age ≥55 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.234), alcohol consumption (HR, 1.001), and H. pylori infection (HR, 1.580) were associated with increased mucosal atrophy. The risk factors for gastric neoplasm in underlying mucosal atrophy were age ≥55 years (HR, 2.582), alcohol consumption (HR, 1.003), extent of mucosal atrophy (HR, 2.285 in C3-O1; HR, 4.187 in O2–O3), and intestinal metaplasia (HR, 2.655). CONCLUSIONS: Extent of atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and alcohol consumption are significant risk factors for gastric neoplasm in underlying mucosal atrophy.


Subject(s)
Adenoma , Alcohol Drinking , Atrophy , Breath Tests , Carcinogenesis , Classification , Cohort Studies , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Gastritis, Atrophic , Helicobacter pylori , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Metaplasia , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stomach , Stomach Neoplasms , Urea , Urease
16.
Gut and Liver ; : 612-619, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Atrophic gastritis is considered a premalignant lesion. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors for gastric tumorigenesis in underlying mucosal atrophy. METHODS: A total of 10,185 subjects who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between 2003 and 2004 were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. Follow-up endoscopy was performed between 2005 and 2014. Atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia were assessed by endoscopy using the Kimura-Takemoto classification. Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated based on serum immunoglobulin G antibody levels, the rapid urease test, or the urea breath test. RESULTS: Atrophic gastritis was confirmed in 3,714 patients at baseline; 2,144 patients were followed up for 6.9 years, and 1,138 exhibited increased atrophy. A total of 69 subjects were diagnosed with gastric neoplasm during follow-up (35 adenoma and 34 carcinoma). Age ≥55 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.234), alcohol consumption (HR, 1.001), and H. pylori infection (HR, 1.580) were associated with increased mucosal atrophy. The risk factors for gastric neoplasm in underlying mucosal atrophy were age ≥55 years (HR, 2.582), alcohol consumption (HR, 1.003), extent of mucosal atrophy (HR, 2.285 in C3-O1; HR, 4.187 in O2–O3), and intestinal metaplasia (HR, 2.655). CONCLUSIONS: Extent of atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and alcohol consumption are significant risk factors for gastric neoplasm in underlying mucosal atrophy.


Subject(s)
Adenoma , Alcohol Drinking , Atrophy , Breath Tests , Carcinogenesis , Classification , Cohort Studies , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Gastritis, Atrophic , Helicobacter pylori , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Metaplasia , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stomach , Stomach Neoplasms , Urea , Urease
17.
Intestinal Research ; : 333-342, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-139343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: A percutaneous gastrostomy can be placed either endoscopically (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, PEG) or radiologically (radiologically-inserted gastrostomy, RIG). However, there is no consistent evidence of the safety and efficacy of PEG compared to RIG. Recently, 30-day mortality has become considered as the most important surrogate index for evaluating the safety and efficacy of percutaneous gastrostomy. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the 30-day mortality rates between PEG and RIG. METHODS: Major electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane library) were queried for comparative studies on the two insertion techniques of gastrostomy among adults with swallowing disturbance. The primary outcome was the 30-day mortality rate after gastrostomy insertion. Forest and funnel plots were generated for outcomes using STATA version 14.0. RESULTS: Fifteen studies (n=2,183) met the inclusion criteria. PEG was associated with a lower risk of 30-day mortality after tube placement compared with RIG (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38–0.94; P=0.026). The pooled prevalence of 30-day mortality of PEG was 5.5% (95% CI, 4.0%–6.9%) and that of RIG was 10.5% (95% CI, 6.8%–14.3%). No publication bias was noted. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis demonstrated that PEG is associated with a lower probability of 30-day mortality compared to RIG, suggesting that PEG should be considered as the first choice for long-term enteral tube feeding. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to evaluate and compare the safety of these two different methods of gastrostomy.


Subject(s)
Adult , Deglutition , Endoscopy , Enteral Nutrition , Fluoroscopy , Forests , Gastrostomy , Humans , Mortality , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Publication Bias
18.
Intestinal Research ; : 333-342, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-139338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: A percutaneous gastrostomy can be placed either endoscopically (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, PEG) or radiologically (radiologically-inserted gastrostomy, RIG). However, there is no consistent evidence of the safety and efficacy of PEG compared to RIG. Recently, 30-day mortality has become considered as the most important surrogate index for evaluating the safety and efficacy of percutaneous gastrostomy. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the 30-day mortality rates between PEG and RIG. METHODS: Major electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane library) were queried for comparative studies on the two insertion techniques of gastrostomy among adults with swallowing disturbance. The primary outcome was the 30-day mortality rate after gastrostomy insertion. Forest and funnel plots were generated for outcomes using STATA version 14.0. RESULTS: Fifteen studies (n=2,183) met the inclusion criteria. PEG was associated with a lower risk of 30-day mortality after tube placement compared with RIG (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38–0.94; P=0.026). The pooled prevalence of 30-day mortality of PEG was 5.5% (95% CI, 4.0%–6.9%) and that of RIG was 10.5% (95% CI, 6.8%–14.3%). No publication bias was noted. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis demonstrated that PEG is associated with a lower probability of 30-day mortality compared to RIG, suggesting that PEG should be considered as the first choice for long-term enteral tube feeding. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to evaluate and compare the safety of these two different methods of gastrostomy.


Subject(s)
Adult , Deglutition , Endoscopy , Enteral Nutrition , Fluoroscopy , Forests , Gastrostomy , Humans , Mortality , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Publication Bias
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-110668

ABSTRACT

Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, especially among the elderly. However little is known about gastric cancer in elderly patients. This study was designed to evaluate the specific features of gastric cancer in elderly patients. Medical records of 1,107 patients who had radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2005 and December 2009 were reviewed. They were divided into young ( or =75 yr, n=99). Increased CA 19-9 (5.6%, 13.4%, 14.6%, P=0.001), advanced diseases (42.5%, 47.0%, and 57.6, P=0.014), and node metastasis (37.6%, 38.9%, 51.5%, P=0.029) were more common in the young-old and old-old age groups. There were no significant differences in Helicobacter pylori status (63.6%, 56.7%, 61.2%, P=0.324) between the three groups. Surgery-related complication rates were similar in the three groups (5.3%, 5.1%, 8.1%, P=0.497). Microsatellite instability (P<0.001) and p53 overexpression (P<0.001) were more common among the elderly. The elderly group had more synchronous tumors (7.5%, 10.2%, 17.2%; P=0.006). Surgery can be applied to elderly gastric cancer without significant risk of complications. However, considering the more advanced disease and synchronous tumors among the elderly, care should be taken while deciding the extent of surgery for elderly gastric cancer.


Subject(s)
Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Causality , Comorbidity , Female , Gastrectomy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Safety , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prevalence , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Sex Distribution , Stomach Neoplasms/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
20.
Gut and Liver ; : 371-376, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-158226

ABSTRACT

Common bile duct (CBD) cancer is a relatively rare malignancy that arises from the biliary epithelium and is associated with a poor prognosis. Here, we report a case of advanced metastatic CBD cancer successfully treated by chemotherapy with gemcitabine combined with S-1 (tegafur+gimeracil+oteracil). A 65-year-old male presented with pyogenic liver abscess. After antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage, follow-up computed tomography (CT) showed an enhanced nodule in the CBD. Biopsy was performed at the CBD via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which showed adenocarcinoma. Additional CT and magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple small nodules in the right hepatic lobe, which were confirmed as metastatic adenocarcinoma by sono-guided liver biopsy. The patient underwent combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and S-1. After nine courses of chemotherapy, the hepatic lesion disappeared radiologically. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed, and no residual tumor was found in the resected specimen. Three weeks after the operation, the patient was discharged with no complications. Through 3 months of follow-up, no sign of recurrence was observed on CT scan. Gemcitabine combined with S-1 may be a highly effective treatment for advanced cholangiocarcinoma.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Biopsy , Cholangiocarcinoma , Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde , Common Bile Duct , Deoxycytidine , Drainage , Drug Therapy, Combination , Epithelium , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Liver , Liver Abscess, Pyogenic , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Neoplasm, Residual , Pancreaticoduodenectomy , Prognosis , Recurrence , Silicates , Titanium
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