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1.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 51-63, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971605

ABSTRACT

RBM46 is a germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein required for gametogenesis, but the targets and molecular functions of RBM46 remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that RBM46 binds at specific motifs in the 3'UTRs of mRNAs encoding multiple meiotic cohesin subunits and show that RBM46 is required for normal synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis initiation. Using a recently reported, high-resolution technique known as LACE-seq and working with low-input cells, we profiled the targets of RBM46 at single-nucleotide resolution in leptotene and zygotene stage gametes. We found that RBM46 preferentially binds target mRNAs containing GCCUAU/GUUCGA motifs in their 3'UTRs regions. In Rbm46 knockout mice, the RBM46-target cohesin subunits displayed unaltered mRNA levels but had reduced translation, resulting in the failed assembly of axial elements, synapsis disruption, and meiotic arrest. Our study thus provides mechanistic insights into the molecular functions of RBM46 in gametogenesis and illustrates the power of LACE-seq for investigations of RNA-binding protein functions when working with low-abundance input materials.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , 3' Untranslated Regions/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Gametogenesis/genetics , Meiosis/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
2.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 1525-1547, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-981152

ABSTRACT

Cell cycle plays a crucial role in cell development. Cell cycle progression is mainly regulated by cyclin dependent kinase (CDK), cyclin and endogenous CDK inhibitor (CKI). Among these, CDK is the main cell cycle regulator, binding to cyclin to form the cyclin-CDK complex, which phosphorylates hundreds of substrates and regulates interphase and mitotic progression. Abnormal activity of various cell cycle proteins can cause uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells, which leads to cancer development. Therefore, understanding the changes in CDK activity, cyclin-CDK assembly and the role of CDK inhibitors will help to understand the underlying regulatory processes in cell cycle progression, as well as provide a basis for the treatment of cancer and disease and the development of CDK inhibitor-based therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the key events of CDK activation or inactivation, and summarizes the regulatory processes of cyclin-CDK at specific times and locations, as well as the progress of research on relevant CDK inhibitor therapeutics in cancer and disease. The review concludes with a brief description of the current challenges of the cell cycle process, with the aim to provide scientific references and new ideas for further research on cell cycle process.


Subject(s)
Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/metabolism , Cyclins/metabolism , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Cycle/physiology , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2
3.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 132-148, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-970364

ABSTRACT

The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (Bet) family are the regulators of the epigenome and also the pivotal driving factors for the expression of tumor related genes that tumor cells depend on for survival and proliferation. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4) is a member of the Bet protein family. Generally, Brd4 identifies acetylated histones and binds to the promoter or enhancer region of target genes to initiate and maintain expression of tumor related genes. Brd4 is closely related to the regulation of multiple transcription factors and chromatin modification and is involved in DNA damage repair and maintenance of telomere function, thus maintaining the survival of tumor cells. This review summarizes the structure and function of Brd4 protein and the application of its inhibitors in tumor research.


Subject(s)
Humans , Transcription Factors/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Histones , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , Protein Domains
4.
Frontiers of Medicine ; (4): 317-329, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-982568

ABSTRACT

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a critical role in the regulation of atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the role of the lncRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (lncR-GAS5) in atherogenesis. We found that the enforced expression of lncR-GAS5 contributed to the development of atherosclerosis, which presented as increased plaque size and reduced collagen content. Moreover, impaired autophagy was observed, as shown by a decreased LC3II/LC3I protein ratio and an elevated P62 level in lncR-GAS5-overexpressing human aortic endothelial cells. By contrast, lncR-GAS5 knockdown promoted autophagy. Moreover, serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 10 (SRSF10) knockdown increased the LC3II/LC3I ratio and decreased the P62 level, thus enhancing the formation of autophagic vacuoles, autolysosomes, and autophagosomes. Mechanistically, lncR-GAS5 regulated the downstream splicing factor SRSF10 to impair autophagy in the endothelium, which was reversed by the knockdown of SRSF10. Further results revealed that overexpression of the lncR-GAS5-targeted gene miR-193-5p promoted autophagy and autophagic vacuole accumulation by repressing its direct target gene, SRSF10. Notably, miR-193-5p overexpression decreased plaque size and increased collagen content. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that lncR-GAS5 partially contributes to atherogenesis and plaque instability by impairing endothelial autophagy. In conclusion, lncR-GAS5 overexpression arrested endothelial autophagy through the miR-193-5p/SRSF10 signaling pathway. Thus, miR-193-5p/SRSF10 may serve as a novel treatment target for atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Atherosclerosis/genetics , Autophagy/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelium/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Repressor Proteins/metabolism , RNA Splicing Factors , Serine-Arginine Splicing Factors/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism
5.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 202-216, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-982531

ABSTRACT

Although the mTOR-4E-BP1 signaling pathway is implicated in aging and aging-related disorders, the role of 4E-BP1 in regulating human stem cell homeostasis remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the expression of 4E-BP1 decreases along with the senescence of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Genetic inactivation of 4E-BP1 in hMSCs compromises mitochondrial respiration, increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and accelerates cellular senescence. Mechanistically, the absence of 4E-BP1 destabilizes proteins in mitochondrial respiration complexes, especially several key subunits of complex III including UQCRC2. Ectopic expression of 4E-BP1 attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities and alleviates cellular senescence in 4E-BP1-deficient hMSCs as well as in physiologically aged hMSCs. These f indings together demonstrate that 4E-BP1 functions as a geroprotector to mitigate human stem cell senescence and maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, particularly for the mitochondrial respiration complex III, thus providing a new potential target to counteract human stem cell senescence.


Subject(s)
Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Cellular Senescence , Homeostasis , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Mitochondria/metabolism , Electron Transport Complex III/metabolism , Cells, Cultured
6.
Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer ; (12): 310-318, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-982161

ABSTRACT

Spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a protective mechanism for cells to undergo accurate mitosis. SAC prevented chromosome segregation when kinetochores were not, or incorrectly attached to microtubules in the anaphase of mitosis, thus avoiding aneuploid chromosomes in daughter cells. Aneuploidy and altered expression of SAC component proteins are common in different cancers, including lung cancer. Therefore, SAC is a potential new target for lung cancer therapy. Five small molecule inhibitors of monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1), an upstream component protein of SAC, have entered clinical trials. This article introduces the biological functions of SAC, summarizes the abnormal expression of SAC component proteins in various cancers and the research progress of MPS1 inhibitors, and expects to provide a reference for the future development of lung cancer therapeutic strategies targeting SAC components.
.


Subject(s)
Humans , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Spindle Apparatus/metabolism , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , M Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism
7.
Biol. Res ; 51: 44, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-983945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence indicate that miRNAs play an important role on gastric cancer (GC) progression via regulating several downstream targets, but it is still partially uncovered. This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms of GC by comprehensive analysis of mRNAs and miRNA expression profiles. METHODS: The mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of GSE79973 and GSE67354 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus were used to analyze the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and DE-miRNAs among GC tissues and normal tissues. Then, targets genes of DE-miRNAs were predicted and the DE-miRNA-DEG regulatory network was constructed. Next, function enrichment analysis of the overlapped genes between the predicted DE-miRNAs targets and DEGs was performed and a protein-protein interactions network of overlapped genes was constructed. Finally, RT-PCR analysis was performed to detect the expression levels of several key DEGs and DE-miRNAs. RESULTS: A set of 703 upregulated and 600 downregulated DEGs, as well as 8 upregulated DE-miRNAs and 27 downregulated DE-miRNAs were identified in GC tissue. hsa-miR-193b-3p and hsa-miR-148a-3p, which targeted most DEGs, were highlighted in the DE-miRNA-DEG regulatory network, as well as hsa-miR-1179, which targeted KNL1, was newly predicted to be associated with GC. In addition, NCAPG, which is targeted by miR-193b-3p, and KNL1, which is targeted by hsa-miR-1179, had higher degrees in the PPI network. RT-qPCR results showed that hsa-miR-148a-3p, hsa-miR-193b-3p, and hsa-miR-1179 were downregulated, and NCAPG and KNL1 were upregulated in GC tissues; this is consistent with our bioinformatics-predicted results. CONCLUSIONS: The downregulation of miR-193b-3p might contribute to GC cell proliferation by mediating the upregulation of NCAPG; as additionally, the downregulation of miR-193b-3p might contribute to the mitotic nuclear division of GC cells by mediating the upregulation of KNL1.


Subject(s)
Humans , Stomach Neoplasms/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics , Up-Regulation/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Stomach Neoplasms/diagnosis , Stomach Neoplasms/genetics , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Disease Progression , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/metabolism
8.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(6): 1060-1067, Nov.-Dec. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892928

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: miR-483-5p has been identified as a miRNA oncogene in certain cancers. However, its role in prostate cancer has not been sufficiently investigated. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-483-5p in prostate cancer and examined RBM5 regulation by miR-483-5p. Material and methods: Expression levels of miR-483-5p were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The effect of miR-483-5p on proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell invasion was evaluated by trans-well invasion assays, and target protein expression was determined by western blotting in LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3 cells. Luciferase reporter plasmids were constructed to confirm the action of miR-483-5p on downstream target gene RBM5 in HEK-293T cells. Results: we observed that miR-483-5p was upregulated in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues. A miR-483-5p inhibitor inhibited prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in DU-145 and PC-3 cells. miR-483-5p directly bound to the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of RBM5 in HEK-293T cells. RBM5 overexpression inhibited prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in LNCaP cells. Enforced RBM5 expression alleviated miR-483-5p promotion of prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in LNCaP cells. Conclusion: The present study describes a potential mechanism underlying a miR-483-5p/RBM5 link that contributes to prostate cancer development.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Untranslated Regions/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/physiology , Cell Proliferation/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Prostatic Neoplasms/mortality , Down-Regulation , Up-Regulation , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/antagonists & inhibitors , Cell Line, Tumor , Neoplasm Invasiveness
9.
Cad. saúde pública ; 31(3): 620-632, 03/2015. tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-744835

ABSTRACT

O estudo descreve os pontos de venda de alimentos e sua associação com sobrepeso/obesidade em escolares de Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil. Desenho transversal com amostra probabilística de 2.506 escolares de escolas públicas (n = 19) e privadas (n = 11). O sobrepeso/obesidade foi classificado pela referência da Organização Mundial da Saúde de 2007. Foram realizadas análises brutas e ajustadas por meio de regressão de Poisson. A prevalência de sobrepeso/obesidade foi de 34,2%. Na rede pública, foram verificados 19,6% de sobrepeso e 13,5% de obesidade. Na rede privada, observaram-se 22,4% de sobrepeso e 11,1% de obesidade. Na rede pública, foi encontrada associação entre sobrepeso/obesidade e utilização da padaria (p = 0,004). Na rede privada, observou-se que os escolares de famílias que utilizaram o supermercado apresentaram 26% menos de sobrepeso/obesidade do que os escolares que não utilizam esses pontos de venda de alimentos (p = 0,003). Os dados encontrados evidenciam a existência de associação entre a utilização de alguns tipos de pontos de venda de alimentos (supermercado e padaria) e a prevalência de sobrepeso/obesidade na população escolar.


The study analyzes retail food outlets and their association with overweight/obesity in schoolchildren from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. The study used a cross-sectional design with a random sample of 2,506 schoolchildren from public (n = 19) and private schools (n = 11). Overweight and obesity were classified according to World Health Organization guidelines for 2007, and crude and adjusted analyses were performed using Poisson regression. Prevalence of overweight/obesity was 34.2%. In public schools, 19.6% of the children were overweight and 13.5% were obese, as compared to 22.4% and 11.1% in private schools. An association was found in the public school system between overweight/obesity and the use of bakeries for food purchases (p = 0.004). In the private school system, children of families that bought groceries at the supermarket showed 26% less overweight/obesity compared to those who did not (p = 0.003). The data show an association between some types of food outlets (supermarkets and bakeries) and prevalence of overweight/obesity in the school-age population.


El estudio describe los puntos de venta de alimentos y su asociación con el sobrepeso/obesidad en escolares de Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil. Se trata de un estudio transversal con una muestra aleatoria de 2.506 escolares de las escuelas públicas (n = 19) y privadas (n = 11). El sobrepeso/obesidad se clasifica, en función de la OMS en 2007, con análisis ajustados y crudos que se realizaron mediante la regresión de Poisson. La prevalencia de sobrepeso/obesidad fue de un 34,2%. En el sistema público el resultado fue de un 19,6% sobrepeso y un 13,5% obesidad. En el privado se observó un 22,4% de sobrepeso y 11,1% obesidad. En el primero se encontró una correlación entre el sobrepeso/obesidad y el consumo de bollería (p = 0,004). En las escuelas privadas se observó que los escolares de familias que habían utilizado el supermercado tenían un 26% menos de sobrepeso/ obesidad que los niños en edad escolar que no utilizaron este punto de venta de alimentos (p = 0,003). En el momento del estudio existe una asociación entre el uso de algunos tipos de punto de venta de alimentos (supermercado y panadería) y la prevalencia de sobrepeso/obesidad en escolares.


Subject(s)
DNA, Fungal/chemistry , HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism , Telomere/chemistry , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/genetics , Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/metabolism , DNA, Fungal/metabolism , Enzyme Activation , HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Telomerase/metabolism , Telomere-Binding Proteins/genetics , Telomere-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Telomere/metabolism
10.
Dental press j. orthod. (Impr.) ; 20(1): 45-51, Jan-Feb/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-741446

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The consensus about the relationship between TMD and orthodontic treatment has gone from a cause and effect association between TMD and orthodontic treatment to the idea that there is no reliable evidence supporting this statement. OBJECTIVE: To assess the beliefs, despite scientific evidence, of Brazilian orthodontists about the relationship between TMD and orthodontic treatment with regards to treatment, prevention and etiology of TMD. METHODS: A survey about the relationship between TMD and orthodontic treatment was prepared and sent to Brazilian orthodontists by e-mail and social networks. Answers were treated by means of descriptive statistics and strong associations between variables were assessed by qui-square test. RESULTS: The majority of orthodontists believe that orthodontic treatment not only is not the best treatment option for TMD, but also is not able to prevent TMD. Nevertheless, the majority of orthodontists believe that orthodontic treatment can cause TMD symptoms. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that orthodontists' beliefs about the relationship between orthodontic treatment and TMD are in accordance with scientific evidence only when referring to treatment and prevention of TMD. The majority of orthodontists believe that, despite scientific evidence, orthodontic treatment can cause TMD. .


INTRODUÇÃO: o consenso sobre a relação entre DTM e tratamento ortodôntico foi de uma associação de causa e efeito à ideia de que não há evidências confiáveis que suportem essa afirmação. OBJETIVO: avaliar as crenças, sem considerar as evidências, de ortodontistas brasileiros sobre a relação entre DTM e tratamento ortodôntico com relação ao tratamento, prevenção e etiologia da DTM. MÉTODOS: um questionário sobre a relação entre DTM e tratamento ortodôntico foi preparado e enviado a ortodontistas brasileiros por meio de e-mail e mídias sociais. As respostas foram analisadas por estatística descritiva, e fortes associações entre as variáveis foram verificadas pelo teste χ2. RESULTADOS: a maioria dos ortodontistas acredita que o tratamento ortodôntico não é o melhor tratamento para DTM. Além disso, acreditam que não é a melhor forma para sua prevenção. Também, a maioria dos ortodontistas acredita que o tratamento ortodôntico pode causar sintomas de DTM. CONCLUSÃO: este estudo sugere que as crenças dos ortodontistas sobre a relação entre tratamento ortodôntico e DTM estão de acordo com as evidências científicas apenas quando se trata do tratamento e da prevenção de DTM. A maioria dos ortodontistas acredita que, apesar das evidências científicas, o tratamento ortodôntico pode causar DTM. .


Subject(s)
Humans , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , DNA Replication/genetics , Forkhead Transcription Factors/metabolism , G1 Phase/physiology , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Replication Origin/genetics , Signal Transduction/genetics , Blotting, Western , Cell Fractionation , Cell Line , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , /metabolism , DNA Primers/genetics , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Forkhead Transcription Factors/genetics , Immunoblotting , Immunoprecipitation , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/metabolism , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA Interference
11.
Experimental & Molecular Medicine ; : e166-2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-30204

ABSTRACT

CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a highly conserved zinc finger protein and is best known as a transcription factor. It can function as a transcriptional activator, a repressor or an insulator protein, blocking the communication between enhancers and promoters. CTCF can also recruit other transcription factors while bound to chromatin domain boundaries. The three-dimensional organization of the eukaryotic genome dictates its function, and CTCF serves as one of the core architectural proteins that help establish this organization. The mapping of CTCF-binding sites in diverse species has revealed that the genome is covered with CTCF-binding sites. Here we briefly describe the diverse roles of CTCF that contribute to genome organization and gene expression.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Genome , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Maps , Repressor Proteins/analysis
12.
Biol. Res ; 47: 1-12, 2014. ilus, graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950760

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Interactions between genes and their products give rise to complex circuits known as gene regulatory networks (GRN) that enable cells to process information and respond to external stimuli. Several important processes for life, depend of an accurate and context-specific regulation of gene expression, such as the cell cycle, which can be analyzed through its GRN, where deregulation can lead to cancer in animals or a directed regulation could be applied for biotechnological processes using yeast. An approach to study the robustness of GRN is through the neutral space. In this paper, we explore the neutral space of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cell cycle network through an evolution strategy to generate a neutral graph, composed of Boolean regulatory networks that share the same state sequences of the fission yeast cell cycle. RESULTS: Through simulations it was found that in the generated neutral graph, the functional networks that are not in the wildtype connected component have in general a Hamming distance more than 3 with the wildtype, and more than 10 between the other disconnected functional networks. Significant differences were found between the functional networks in the connected component of the wildtype network and the rest of the network, not only at a topological level, but also at the state space level, where significant differences in the distribution of the basin of attraction for the G1 fixed point was found for deterministic updating schemes. CONCLUSIONS: In general, functional networks in the wildtype network connected component, can mutate up to no more than 3 times, then they reach a point of no return where the networks leave the connected component of the wildtype. The proposed method to construct a neutral graph is general and can be used to explore the neutral space of other biologically interesting networks, and also formulate new biological hypotheses studying the functional networks in the wildtype network connected component.


Subject(s)
Schizosaccharomyces/physiology , Cell Cycle/physiology , Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/metabolism , Gene Regulatory Networks/physiology , Models, Biological , Schizosaccharomyces/genetics , Computer Graphics , Computer Simulation , G1 Phase/physiology , Neural Networks, Computer , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Computational Biology
13.
Rev. méd. Chile ; 141(12): 1570-1577, dic. 2013. ilus, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-705577

ABSTRACT

Gastric cancer is the first cause of death for cancer in Chile. The recently identified genetic alterations in these tumors have not yielded new biomarkers for the disease. Epigenetics or the study of reversible genomic changes that do not affect protein codifying DNA sequences but cause phenotypic disturbances, is identifying new cancer biomarkers. Specifically, the loss of expression caused by the covalent link of a methyl group to carbon 5 of cytosine (DNA hypermethylation) is extensively evaluated. Performing an epigenetic evaluation of 24 genes, we have identified eight genes associated to the aggressive signet ring cell type gastric cancer, the association between APC hypermethylation and worse prognosis and BRCA1 hypermethylation association with early onset of gastric cancer. The most interesting findings are the hypermethylation of Reprimo gene in plasma as a population biomarker and the tissue over expression of p73 gene (as a consequence of hypomethylation) as a high risk indicator of progression to gastric cancer. All these findings are indicating an important role of epigenetics in the pathogenesis and early detection of gastric cancer.


Subject(s)
Humans , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , DNA Methylation/genetics , Epigenomics , Glycoproteins/genetics , Stomach Neoplasms/genetics , Biomarkers, Tumor , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Disease Progression , Early Diagnosis , Glycoproteins/metabolism , Stomach Neoplasms/diagnosis
14.
Clinics ; 68(6): 825-833, jun. 2013. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-676926

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: MiRNAs are intrinsic RNAs that interfere with protein translation. Few studies on the synergistic effects of miRNAs have been reported. Both miR-424 and miR-381 have been individually reported to be involved in carcinogenesis. They share a common putative target, WEE1, which is described as an inhibitor of G2/M progression. Here, we studied the synergistic effects of miR-424 and miR-381 on renal cancer cells. METHODS: The viability of 786-O cells was analyzed after transfection with either a combination of miR-424 and miR-381 or each miRNA alone. We investigated cell cycle progression and apoptosis with flow cytometry. To confirm apoptosis and the abrogation of G2/M arrest, we determined the level of pHH3, which is an indicator of mitosis, and caspase-3/7 activity. The expression levels of WEE1, Cdc25, γH2AX, and Cdc2 were manipulated to investigate the roles of these proteins in the miRNA-induced anti-tumor effects. To verify that WEE1 was a direct target of both miR-424 and miR-381, we performed a dual luciferase reporter assay. RESULTS: We showed that the combination of these miRNAs synergistically inhibited proliferation, abrogated G2/M arrest, and induced apoptosis. This combination led to Cdc2 activation through WEE1 inhibition. This regulation was more effective when cells were treated with both miRNAs than with either miRNA alone, indicating synergy between these miRNAs. WEE1 was verified to be a direct target of each miRNA according to the luciferase reporter assay. CONCLUSIONS: These data clearly demonstrate that these two miRNAs might synergistically act as novel modulators of tumorigenesis by down-regulating WEE1 expression in renal cell cancer cells. .


Subject(s)
Humans , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cyclin B/metabolism , Kidney Neoplasms/genetics , MicroRNAs/pharmacology , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism , Blotting, Western , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Physiological Phenomena , Cell Transformation, Neoplastic , Down-Regulation , Flow Cytometry , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Time Factors , Up-Regulation
15.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1037-1043, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-154187

ABSTRACT

The active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), inhibits the growth of several types of human cancer cells in vitro, but its therapeutic use is limited because it causes hypercalcemia. Among its analogs, 19-nor-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (paricalcitol), has fewer calcemic effects and exhibits an activity equipotent to that of calcitriol. We assessed the antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects of paricalcitol in gastric cancer cells, and evaluated the potential role of vitamin D in the treatment of peritoneal metastatic gastric cancer. In this study, treatment with paricalcitol inhibited gastric cancer cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest. Paricalcitol also induced apoptosis and showed anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, the growth of intraperitoneal metastases in vivo was reduced in mice treated with paricalcitol. 18F-FDG uptake was significantly lower in the paricalcitol group compared to control group (SUV; control group 13.2 +/- 5.3 vs paricalcitol group 4.5 +/- 3.0). Intraperitoneal tumor volume was significantly lower in paricalcitol treated mice (control group 353.2 +/- 22.9 mm3 vs paricalcitol group 252.0 +/- 8.4 mm3). These results suggest that the vitamin D analog, paricalcitol, has anticancer activity on gastric cancer cells by regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Apoptosis/drug effects , Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Disease Models, Animal , Ergocalciferols/chemistry , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/chemistry , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Peritoneal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Positron-Emission Tomography , Stomach Neoplasms/drug therapy , Transplantation, Heterologous
16.
Experimental & Molecular Medicine ; : 389-392, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-102685

ABSTRACT

Cellular senescence is a tumor-suppressive process instigated by proliferation in the absence of telomere replication, by cellular stresses such as oncogene activation, or by activation of the tumor suppressor proteins, such as Rb or p53. This process is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle exit, a unique morphology, and expression of senescence-associated-beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal). Despite the potential biological importance of cellular senescence, little is known of the mechanisms leading to the senescent phenotype. p41-Arc has been known to be a putative regulatory component of the mammalian Arp2/3 complex, which is required for the formation of branched networks of actin filaments at the cell cortex. In this study, we demonstrate that p41-Arc can induce senescent phenotypes when it is overexpressed in human tumor cell line, SaOs-2, which is deficient in p53 and Rb tumor suppressor genes, implying that p41 can induce senescence in a p53-independent way. p41-Arc overexpression causes a change in actin filaments, accumulating actin filaments in nuclei. Therefore, these results imply that a change in actin filament can trigger an intrinsic senescence program in the absence of p53 and Rb tumor suppressor genes.


Subject(s)
Humans , Actin Cytoskeleton/metabolism , Actin-Related Protein 2-3 Complex/metabolism , Cellular Senescence , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Nucleus/metabolism , Fibroblasts/physiology , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Retinoblastoma Protein/deficiency , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/deficiency
17.
Clinics ; 65(8): 757-762, June 2010. ilus, graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-557000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the expression of the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 protein in benign and malignant lesions of the thyroid gland by immunohistochemistry. INTRODUCTION: N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 encodes a protein whose expression is induced by various stimuli, including cell differentiation, exposure to heavy metals, hypoxia, and DNA damage. Increased N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression has been detected in various types of tumors, but the role of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression in thyroid lesions remains to be determined. METHODS: A tissue microarray paraffin block containing 265 tissue fragments corresponding to normal thyroid, nodular goiter, follicular adenoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma (classical pattern and follicular variant), follicular carcinoma, and metastases of papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal anti- N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 antibody. RESULTS: The immunohistochemical expression of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 was higher in carcinomas compared to normal thyroid glands and nodular goiters, with higher expression in classical papillary thyroid carcinomas and metastases of thyroid carcinomas (P < 0.001). A combined analysis showed higher immunohistochemical expression of NDRG1 in malignant lesions (classical pattern and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinomas, follicular carcinomas, and metastases of thyroid carcinomas) compared to benign thyroid lesions (goiter and follicular adenomas) (P = 0.043). In thyroid carcinomas, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression was significantly correlated with a more advanced TNM stage (P = 0.007) and age, metastasis, tumor extent, and size (AMES) high-risk group (P = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Thyroid carcinomas showed increased immunohistochemical N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression compared to normal and benign thyroid lesions and is correlated with more advanced tumor stages.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Adenoma/metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism , Thyroid Neoplasms/metabolism , Adenoma/pathology , Immunohistochemistry , Lymphatic Metastasis , Microarray Analysis , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Paraffin Embedding , Thyroid Neoplasms/pathology
18.
Korean Journal of Ophthalmology ; : 35-39, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-22609

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the cancer stem cell-vascular niche complex in human retinoblastoma tissue. METHODS: Six human retinoblastoma specimens primarily enucleated for Reese-Ellsworth classification stage 5a were stained to detect cancer stem cell markers, including ABCG2 for the stem cell marker and MCM2 for the neural stem cell marker, as well as to detect VEGF for the angiogenic cytokine. Using immunofluorescence, the expression of these proteins was analyzed, and their relative locations noted. RESULTS: In non-neoplastic retina of tumor-bearing eyes, ABCG2 and MCM2 were sporadically expressed in the ganglion cell layer and the inner nuclear layer, whereas VEGF was sporadically expressed in inner retina where retinal vessels are abundantly distributed. In the tumor, ABCG2 was strongly expressed out of Wintersteiner rosettes, whereas MCM2 and VEGF were strongly stained in the rosettes. Interestingly, the outer portion of the rosettes was positive for MCM2, and the inner portion of the rosettes was positive for VEGF. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrated that MCM2 and VEGF are strongly expressed in the rosettes of the tumor, which were far from the area of ABCG2-positive cells. Although VEGF might not directly contribute to the cancer stem cell-vascular niche complex, it could play some role in the differentiation of tumor cells to build up the rosettes.


Subject(s)
Humans , ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters/metabolism , Biomarkers/metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Organ Specificity , Retina/metabolism , Retinal Neoplasms/metabolism , Retinoblastoma/metabolism , Stem Cells/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism
19.
Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Medical Sciences) ; (6): 101-6, 2009.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-635061

ABSTRACT

The low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) in human lung cancer cell line A549 was investigated, the changes of ATM kinase, cell cycle and apoptosis of cells at different doses of radiation were observed, and the possible mechanisms were discussed. A549 cells in logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with (60)Co gamma-rays at doses of 0-2 Gy. Together with flow cytometry for precise cell sorting, cell survival fraction was measured by means of conventional colony-formation assay. The expression of ATM1981Ser-P protein was examined by Western blot 1 h after radiation. Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining, and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining flow cytometry 24 h after radiation. Cell cycle distribution was observed by flow cytometry 6, 12 and 24 h after radiation. The results showed that the expression of ATM1981Ser-P protein was observed at 0.2 Gy, followed by an increase at >0.2 Gy, and reached the peak at 0.5 Gy, with little further increase as the dose exceeded 0.5 Gy. Twenty-four h after radiation, partial cells presented the characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis, and the cell apoptosis curve was coincident with the survival curve. As compared with control group, the cell cycle almost had no changes after exposure to 0.1 and 0.2 Gy radiation (P>0.05). After exposure to 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy radiation, G(2)/M phase arrest occurred 6 and 12 h after radiation (P<0.05), and the ratio of G(2)/M phase cells was decreased 24 h after radiation (P<0.05). It was concluded that A549 cells displayed the phenomenon of HRS/IRR. The mode of cell death was mainly apoptosis. The activity of ATM and cell cycle change may take an important role in HRS/IRR.


Subject(s)
Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/physiology , Cell Line, Tumor , DNA-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/physiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Radiation Dosage , Radiation Tolerance/physiology , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism
20.
Arq. bras. endocrinol. metab ; 51(6): 1000-1006, ago. 2007. ilus, tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-464294

ABSTRACT

O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a histomorfometria e a taxa de proliferação e apoptose da glândula mamária de ratas tratadas com tiroxina pela imuno-expressão de CDC-47 e caspase-3, respectivamente. Também foi avaliado o desenvolvimento dos filhotes de ratas tratadas com tiroxina. Foram utilizadas 36 ratas distribuídas em dois grupos, tratado com tiroxina e controle. Após 60 dias de tratamento com tiroxina, as ratas foram acasaladas. Seis animais/grupo foram sacrificados no 2° e 21° dias de lactação e no 5° dia após o desmame. Houve diferença significativa entre grupos apenas no quinto dia após o desmame. O tratamento com tiroxina aumentou a taxa de apoptose caracterizada pela maior expressão de caspase-3 nas células do epitélio mamário. As mães tratadas com tiroxina apresentaram comportamento alterado, mas não houve diferença significativa no que se refere aos cuidados com o filhote quanto a higienização e aquecimento. Levando-se em consideração o sexo e o tamanho da ninhada, os filhotes das ratas tratadas com tiroxina e controle não apresentaram diferença significativa de peso ao desmame. Conclui-se que a administração de baixas doses de tiroxina aumenta a taxa de apoptose, caracterizada pelo aumento da expressão de caspase-3 no epitélio mamário cinco dias após o desmame, mas não altera a taxa de proliferação celular e o comportamento materno.


The purpose of this study was to evaluate mammary gland histomorphometry and proliferation rate and apoptosis of thyroxine-treated rats by CDC-47 and caspase-3 immunoexpression. The development of thyroxine-treated rats offspring was also evaluated. Thirty-six female rats were used, distributed in two groups, treated and non-treated with thyroxine. After 60 days of treatment, with thyroxine, rats were mated. Six animals/group were sacrificed on the 2nd and 21st days of lactation and on the 5th day after weaning. A significant difference was observed between groups only on the 5th day after weaning. Thyroxine treatment increased apoptosis rate, which was characterized by a higher caspase-3 expression in mammary epithelial cells. Thyroxine-treated mothers presented changed behavior, but there was no significant difference regarding taking care of offspring, as for cleaning offspring and keeping them warm. Taking into account sex and size of offspring, those from control and thyroxine-treated mothers presented no significant difference of weight and weaning. In conclusion, administering low doses of thyroxine increases apoptosis rate, which is characterized by the increased caspase-3 immunoexpression in mammary epithelial cells 5 days after weaning. But does not affect proliferation rate and development of thyroxine-treated rats offspring.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Male , Pregnancy , Rats , Apoptosis/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Lactation/drug effects , Mammary Glands, Animal/drug effects , Thyroxine/pharmacology , Weaning , Breast Feeding , Case-Control Studies , /drug effects , /metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/drug effects , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Mammary Glands, Animal/pathology , Maternal Behavior/drug effects , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Rats, Wistar , Thyroxine/administration & dosage
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