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1.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190023, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056577

ABSTRACT

Abstract When exposure of the pulp to external environment occurs, reparative dentinogenesis can be induced by direct pulp capping to maintain pulp tissue vitality and function. These clinical situations require the use of materials that induce dentin repair and, subsequently, formation of a mineralized tissue. Objective: This work aims to assess the effect of tricalcium silicate cements and mineral trioxide aggregate cements, including repairing dentin formation and inflammatory reactions over time after pulp exposure in Wistar rats. Methodology: These two biomaterials were compared with positive control groups (open cavity with pulp tissue exposure) and negative control groups (no intervention). The evaluations were performed in three stages; three, seven and twenty-one days, and consisted of an imaging (nuclear medicine) and histological evaluation (H&E staining, immunohistochemistry and Alizarin Red S). Results: The therapeutic effect of these biomaterials was confirmed. Nuclear medicine evaluation demonstrated that the uptake of 99mTc-Hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HMDP) showed no significant differences between the different experimental groups and the control, revealing the non-occurrence of differences in the phosphocalcium metabolism. The histological study demonstrated that in mineral trioxide aggregate therapies, the presence of moderate inflammatory infiltration was found after three days, decreasing during follow-ups. The formation of mineralized tissue was only verified at 21 days of follow-up. The tricalcium silicate therapies demonstrated the presence of a slight inflammatory infiltration on the third day, increasing throughout the follow-up. The formation of mineralized tissue was observed in the seventh follow-up day, increasing over time. Conclusions: The mineral trioxide aggregate (WhiteProRoot®MTA) and tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™) present slight and reversible inflammatory signs in the pulp tissue, with the formation of mineralized tissue. However, the exacerbated induction of mineralized tissue formation with the tricalcium silicate biomaterial may lead to the formation of pulp calcifications


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Oxides/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Dentinogenesis/drug effects , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Pulpitis/pathology , Pulpitis/drug therapy , Sialoglycoproteins/analysis , Time Factors , Immunohistochemistry , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Extracellular Matrix Proteins/analysis , Dental Pulp Exposure/pathology , Dental Pulp Exposure/drug therapy , Rats, Wistar , Dental Pulp/pathology , Dental Pulp Capping/methods , Drug Combinations , Molecular Imaging/methods , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/pharmacology , Odontoblasts/drug effects
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190105, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056578

ABSTRACT

Abstract Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been highlighted as a promising alternative for endodontic use aiming at periapical tissue repair. However, its effects on dental pulp cells have been poorly explored. Objective: This study assessed the impact of calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) or zinc oxide (ZnO) additives on odontoblast cell response to CAC. Methodology: MDPC-23 cells were exposed for up to 14 d: 1) CAC with 2.8% CaCl2 and 25% ZnO (CACz); 2) CAC with 2.8% CaCl2 and 25% Bi2O3 (CACb); 3) CAC with 10% CaCl2 and 25% Bi2O3 (CACb+); or 4) mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), placed on inserts. Non-exposed cultures served as control. Cell morphology, cell viability, gene expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1), ALP activity, and extracellular matrix mineralization were evaluated. Data were compared using ANOVA (α=5%). Results: Lower cell density was detected only for MTA and CACb+ compared with Control, with areas showing reduced cell spreading. Cell viability was similar among groups at days one and three (p>0.05). CACb+ and MTA showed the lowest cell viability values at day seven (p>0.05). CACb and CACb+ promoted higher ALP and BSP expression compared with CACz (p<0.05); despite that, all cements supported ALP activity. Matrix mineralization were enhanced in CACb+ and MTA. Conclusion: In conclusion, CAC with Bi2O3, but not with ZnO, supported the expression of odontoblastic phenotype, but only the composition with 10% CaCl2 promoted mineralized matrix formation, rendering it suitable for dentin-pulp complex repair.


Subject(s)
Humans , Mice , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Dental Cements/pharmacology , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Oxides/pharmacology , Oxides/chemistry , Time Factors , Zinc Oxide/pharmacology , Zinc Oxide/chemistry , Bismuth/pharmacology , Bismuth/chemistry , Materials Testing , Calcium Chloride/pharmacology , Calcium Chloride/chemistry , Gene Expression/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Silicates/pharmacology , Silicates/chemistry , Drug Combinations , Alkaline Phosphatase/analysis , Alkaline Phosphatase/drug effects , Odontoblasts/drug effects
3.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190384, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1134801

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives This study evaluated if the use of a bioactive glass-ceramic-based gel, named Biosilicate (BS), before, after or mixed with bleaching gel, could influence the inflammation of the dental pulp tissue of rats' molars undergoing dental bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methodology The upper molars of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus, albinus) were divided into Ble: bleached (35% H2O2, 30-min); Ble-BS: bleached and followed by BS-based gel application (20 min); BS-Ble: BS-based gel application and then bleaching; BS/7d-Ble: BS-based gel applications for 7 days and then bleaching; Ble+BS: blend of H2O2 with BS-based gel (1:1, 30-min); and control: placebo gel. After 2 and 30 days (n=10), the rats were euthanized for histological evaluation. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn statistical tests were performed (P<0.05). Results At 2 days, the Ble and Ble-BS groups had significant alterations in the pulp tissue, with an area of necrosis. The groups with the application of BS-based gel before H2O2 had moderate inflammation and partial disorganization in the occlusal third of the coronary pulp and were significantly different from the Ble in the middle and cervical thirds (P<0.05). The most favorable results were observed in the Ble+BS, which was similar to the control in all thirds of the coronary pulp (P>0.05). At 30 days, the pulp tissue was organized and the bleached groups presented tertiary dentin deposition. The Ble group had the highest deposition of tertiary dentin, followed by the Ble-BS, and both were different from control (P<0.05). Conclusion A single BS-based gel application beforehand or BS-based gel blended with a bleaching gel minimize the pulp damage induced by dental bleaching.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Pulpitis/prevention & control , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Glass/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Pulpitis/chemically induced , Pulpitis/pathology , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Dental Pulp/pathology , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Molar
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190215, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1056582

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the angiogenesis-enhancing potential of a tricalcium silicate-based mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot MTA), Biodentine, and a novel bioceramic root canal sealer (Well-Root ST) in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPLSCs), and human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs). Methodology: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium was conditioned for 24 h by exposure to ProRoot MTA, Biodentine, or Well-Root ST specimens (prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions). The cells were cultured in these conditioned media and their viability was assessed with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxy-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-sulfo-phenyl)-2H tetrazolium (MTS) on days 1, 3, 7, 10, and 14. Angiogenic growth factors [platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)] were assayed by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on days 1, 7, and 14. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration assays were used to evaluate the vascular effects of the tested materials at 6-8 h. Statistical analyses included Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: None of tricalcium silicate-based materials were cytotoxic and all induced a similar release of angiogenic growth factors (PDGF, FGF-2, and VEGF) (p>0.05). The best cell viability was observed for hDPSCs (p<0.05) with all tricalcium silicate-based materials at day 14. Tube formation by HUVECs showed a significant increase with all tested materials (p<0.05). Conclusion: The tricalcium silicate-based materials showed potential for angiogenic stimulation of all stem cell types and significantly enhanced tube formation by HUVECs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Stem Cells/drug effects , Ceramics/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Angiogenesis Inducing Agents/pharmacology , Periodontal Ligament/cytology , Periodontal Ligament/drug effects , Tooth Germ/cytology , Tooth Germ/drug effects , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Platelet-Derived Growth Factor/analysis , Platelet-Derived Growth Factor/drug effects , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Cell Survival/drug effects , Reproducibility of Results , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2/analysis , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2/drug effects , Statistics, Nonparametric , Neovascularization, Physiologic/drug effects , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/analysis , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/drug effects , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Flow Cytometry
5.
Rev. Asoc. Odontol. Argent ; 107(3): 110-115, jul.-sept. 2019.
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1048552

ABSTRACT

Este trabajo pretende actualizar los conocimientos acerca de los diversos materiales utilizados en las terapias pulpares (tanto en dientes primarios como en permanentes) que buscan una respuesta reparativa cada vez más conservadora, biológica y sustentable. Se trata de un recorrido por el uso de agentes como el agregado de trióxido mineral (MTA), el láser, Biodentine® y los concentrados de plasma rico en plaquetas, con sus características, sus posibles aplicaciones y su eficacia, evaluadas clínica y radiográficamente en múltiples trabajos de investigación, informes de casos, estudios comparativos (in vitro e in vivo) y ensayos experimentales en animales que documentan sus resultados (AU)


This literature review aims to update knowledge about the different materials used in pulp therapies (both in primary and permanent teeth) that seek for an increasingly conservative, biological and sustainable reparative response. It is a journey through the use of agents such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), lasers, biodentine and platelet rich plasma concentrates, their properties, applications and efficacy, clinically and radiographically evaluated in multiple research papers, case reports, comparative studies (in vitro and in vivo) and experimental studies in animals that document their results


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Biocompatible Materials/therapeutic use , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Platelet-Rich Plasma , Tooth, Deciduous , Dentition, Permanent , Laser Therapy
6.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180550, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012512

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose To compare, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the inflammatory cells, vascular density and IL-6 immunolabeled cells present in the pulp after pulpotomy with white MTA versus 15.5% ferric sulfate (FS). Methodology Forty-eight mandibular first molars from 24 Wistar rats were divided into MTA or FS groups and subdivided according to the period after pulpotomy procedure (24, 48 and 72 hours). Four teeth (sound and untreated) were used as controls. Histological sections were obtained and assessed through the descriptive analysis of morphological aspects of pulp tissue and the quantification of inflammatory cells, vascular density and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression. Data were statistically analyzed (p<0.05). Results The number of inflammatory cells was similar in both groups, being predominantly localized at the cervical radicular third. In the MTA group, increased inflammation was observed at 48 hours. Vascular density was similar in both groups and over time, being predominant in the medium radicular third. No correlation was found between the number of inflammatory cells and the vascular density. Pulp tissue was more organized in MTA-treated teeth. In both groups, a weak to moderate IL-6 expression was detected in odontoblasts and inflammatory cells. Comparing both groups, there was a greater IL-6 expression in the cervical radicular third of teeth treated with MTA at 24 hours and in the medium and apical thirds at 72 hours, while in the FS group a greater IL-6 expression was found in the apical third at 24 hours. Conclusion The MTA group presented better histological features and greater IL-6 expression than the FS group. However, no difference was observed between the groups regarding the inflammatory status and vascularization, suggesting the usefulness of FS as a low-cost alternative to MTA.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Oxides/pharmacology , Pulpotomy/adverse effects , Ferric Compounds/pharmacology , Interleukin-6/analysis , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Inflammation/immunology , Time Factors , Rats, Wistar , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dental Pulp/pathology , Drug Combinations
7.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180442, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1002405

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective To assess pulp oxygen saturation levels (SaO2) in maxillary central incisors after dental bleaching. Materials and Methods 80 participants (160 teeth) were randomly allocated to four groups: G1 In-office bleaching with two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (20 minutes), followed by at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (2 hours/day for 16 days); G2 - Same protocol as G1, plus desensitizing toothpaste; G3 - In-office bleaching with 35% HP and one application of placebo gel (20 minutes), followed by at-home bleaching with 10% CP (2 hours/day for 16 days); and G4 - Same protocol as G3, plus desensitizing toothpaste. Pulp SaO2 levels were measured before (T0) and immediately after (T1) in-office bleaching; on the 5th (T2), 8th (T3), 12th (T4), and 16th days of at-home bleaching (T5); and on the 7th (T6) and 30th (T7) days. Mean (SD) pulp SaO2 levels were compared within groups by generalized estimating equations (GEE) and Student's t-test (P<0.05). Results Mean pulp SaO2 at T0 was 84.29% in G1, 84.38% in G2, 84.79% in G3, and 85.83% in G4. At T1, these values decreased to 81.96%, 82.06%, 82.19%, and 81.15% in G1, G2, G3, and G4 respectively, with significant difference in G4 (P<0.05). During home bleaching, pulp SaO2 levels varied in all groups, with 86.55%, 86.60%, 85.71%, and 87.15% means at T7 for G1, G2, G3, and G4, respectively; G2 presented significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions Pulp SaO2 level in maxillary central incisors was similar at baseline, reducing immediately after in-office bleaching, regardless of using desensitizing toothpaste and increasing at 30 days after dental bleaching.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Oxygen/metabolism , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Dental Pulp/metabolism , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Incisor/metabolism , Reference Values , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/therapeutic use , Oximetry/methods , Treatment Outcome , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin Sensitivity/chemically induced , Dentin Sensitivity/prevention & control , Dentin Desensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , Carbamide Peroxide/adverse effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Incisor/drug effects
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180195, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975891

ABSTRACT

Abstract Pain due to administration of local anesthetics is the primary reason for patients' fear and anxiety, and various methods are used to minimize it. This study aimed to measure the degree of pain during administration of anesthesia and determine the latency time and duration of pulpal anesthesia using two anesthetic methods in the maxilla. Materials and Methods: A randomized, single-blind, split-mouth clinical trial was conducted with 41 volunteers who required class I restorations in the maxillary first molars. Local anesthesia was administered with a needleless jet injection system (experimental group) or with a carpule syringe (control) using a 30-gauge short needle. The method of anesthesia and laterality of the maxilla were randomized. A pulp electric tester measured the latency time and duration of anesthesia in the second molar. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the degree of pain during the anesthetic method. Data were tabulated and then analyzed by a statistician. The t-test was used to analyze the differences between the groups for basal electrical stimulation. Duration of anesthesia and degree of pain were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. A 5% significance level was considered. Results: There was no statistical difference in the basal electrical stimulation threshold (mA) and degree of pain between the two methods of anesthesia (p>0.05). Latency time was 2 minutes for all subjects. The duration of pulpal anesthesia showed no statistical difference (minutes) between the two methods (p<0.001), with a longer duration for the traditional method of anesthesia (median of 40 minutes). Conclusions: The two anesthetics methods did not differ concerning the pain experienced during anesthesia. Latency lasted 2 minutes for all subjects; the traditional infiltration anesthesia resulted in a longer anesthetic duration compared with the needleless jet injection.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Young Adult , Pain Measurement/methods , Injections, Jet/methods , Pain, Procedural/diagnosis , Anesthesia, Dental/methods , Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage , Time Factors , Single-Blind Method , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Pain Threshold , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dental Restoration, Permanent/methods , Electric Stimulation , Anesthesia, Dental/adverse effects , Needles
9.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180157, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975884

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of surfactants 0.2% or 0.1% cetrimide (Cet) or 0.008% benzalkonium chloride (BAK) on 2.5% calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)2), and compare to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), regarding the properties of pH, free chlorine content, surface tension, contact angle, pulp dissolution and antimicrobial activity. Material and Methods The pH and free chlorine content were evaluated by digital pHmeter and by titration, respectively. Surface tension was measured by the platinum ring technique with a Du Noüy tensiometer. The solution's contact angle in human dentin surfaces was checked by Drop Shape Analyzer software. Bovine pulps were used for pulp dissolution analysis and the dissolving capacity was expressed by percent weight loss. Antimicrobial activity over Enterococcus faecalis was evaluated by the agar diffusion method. Results Surfactants addition to Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl did not alter the pH, free chlorine content and pulp dissolution properties. Ca(OCl)2 had the highest surface tension among all tested solutions. When surfactants were added to Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl, there was a significant reduction of surface tension and contact angle values. The addition of 0.2% or 0.1% Cet enhanced antimicrobial activity of both Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl. Conclusion Surfactant addition to 2.5% Ca(OCl)2 has shown acceptable outcomes for pH, free chlorine content, surface tension, contact angle, pulp dissolution and antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the addition of 0.2% Cet showed better results for all tested properties.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Cattle , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Surface-Active Agents/chemistry , Benzalkonium Compounds/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Cetrimonium/chemistry , Reference Values , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Surface-Active Agents/pharmacology , Surface Properties , Benzalkonium Compounds/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Chlorine/analysis , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Cetrimonium/pharmacology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
10.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e117, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1132651

ABSTRACT

Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Brazilian propolis on the cell viability, mineralization, anti-inflammatory ability, and migration of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). The cell viability was evaluated with CCK-8 kit after 1, 5, 7, and 9 days. The deposition of calcified matrix and the expression of osteogenesis-related genes were evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and real-time PCR after incubation in osteogenic medium for 21 days. The expression of inflammation-related genes in cells was determined after exposure to 1 μg/mL LPS for 3 h. Finally, the numbers of cells that migrated through the permeable membranes were compared during 15 h. Propolis and MTA significantly increased the viability of hDPCscompared to the control group on days 7 and 9. In the propolis group, significant enhancement of osteogenic potential and suppressed expression of IL-1β and IL-6 was observed after LPS exposure compared to the MTA and control groups. The number of migration cells in the propolis group was similar to that of the control group, while MTA significantly promoted cell migration. Propolis showed comparable cell viability to that of MTA and exhibited significantly higher anti-inflammatory and mineralization promotion effects on hDPCs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Oxides/pharmacology , Propolis/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Brazil , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Anthraquinones , Interleukin-6/analysis , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Statistics, Nonparametric , Drug Combinations , Interleukin-1beta/analysis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Odontoblasts/drug effects
11.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e059, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1039303

ABSTRACT

Abstract We recently demonstrated that a co-culture system of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) could enhance angiogenesis ability in vitro. However, whether tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) could promote blood vessel formation during pulp regeneration remained unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TNF-α on the formation of endothelial tubules and vascular networks in a co-culture system of hDPSCs and HUVECs. hDPSCs were co-cultured with HUVECs at a ratio of 1:5. The Matrigel assay was performed to detect the total tubule branching lengths and numbers of branches, and the Cell-Counting Kit 8 assay was performed to examine the effect of TNF-α on cell proliferation. Real-time polymerase chain reactions and western blot were used to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expression. The Matrigel assay showed significantly greater total branching lengths and numbers of branches formed in the experimental groups treated with different concentrations of TNF-α compared with the control group. The decomposition times of the tubule structures were also significantly prolonged (P < 0.05). Treatment with 50 ng/ml TNF-α did not significantly change the proliferation of co-cultured cells, but it significantly increased the VEGF mRNA and protein expression levels (p < 0.05). In addition, the migration abilities of HUVECs and hDPSCs increased after co-culture with TNF-α (p < 0.05). TNF-α enhanced angiogenic ability in vitro in the co-culture system of hDPSCs and HUVECs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology , Neovascularization, Physiologic/drug effects , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Angiogenesis Inducing Agents/pharmacology , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Proteoglycans , Reference Values , Time Factors , Cell Count , Cells, Cultured , Blotting, Western , Reproducibility of Results , Collagen , Laminin , Neovascularization, Physiologic/physiology , Dental Pulp/physiology , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/analysis , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Drug Combinations , Cell Migration Assays , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/physiology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
12.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e013, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989479

ABSTRACT

Abstract Recent studies on functional tissue regeneration have focused on substances that favor cell proliferation and differentiation, including the bioactive phenolic compounds present in grape seed extract (GSE). The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the stimulatory potential of GSE in the functional activity of undifferentiated pulp cells and odontoblast-like cells. OD-21 and MDPC-23 cell lines were cultivated in odontogenic medium until subconfluence, seeded in 24-well culture plates in a concentration of 2x104/well and divided into: 1) OD-21 without GSE; 2) OD-21+10 µg/mL of GSE; 3) MDPC-23 without GSE; 4) MDPC-23+10 µg/mL of GSE. Cell proliferation, in situ detection of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total protein content were assessed after 3, 7 and 10 days, and mineralization was evaluated after 14 days. The data were analyzed by ANOVA statistical tests set at a 5% level of significance. Results revealed that cell proliferation increased after 10 days, and protein content, after 7 days of culture in MDPC-23 cells. In situ ALP staining intensity was higher in undifferentiated pulp cells and odontoblast-like cells after 7 and 10 days, respectively. A discrete increase in MDPC-23 mineralization after GSE treatment was observed despite OD-21 cells presenting a decrease in mineralized nodule deposits. Data suggest that GSE favors functional activity of differentiated cells more broadly than undifferentiated cells (OD-21). More studies with different concentrations of GSE must be conducted to confirm its benefits to cells regarding dentin regeneration.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Grape Seed Extract/pharmacology , Odontoblasts/drug effects , Reference Values , Time Factors , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Dentin/cytology , Dentin/drug effects , Odontogenesis/drug effects
13.
Braz. dent. j ; 29(6): 541-546, Nov.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974196

ABSTRACT

Abstract The present study assessed oxygen saturation (SaO2) levels before, during, and after at-home bleaching treatment in the pulps of healthy maxillary central incisors. SaO2 levels were measured in 136 healthy maxillary central incisors using a pulse oximeter. The bleaching protocol consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide gel placed in individual trays and used for four hours daily for 14 days. SaO2 levels were assessed before bleaching (T0), immediately after the first session (T1), on the 7th day of treatment (T2), on the 15th day (the day following the last session) (T3), and 30 days after completion of the bleaching protocol (T4). Data were statistically analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE), Student's t test (p<0.05) and Pearson's correlation. Mean pulp SaO2 levels were 85.1% at T0, 84.9% at T1, 84.7% at T2, 84.3% at T3, and 85.0% at T4. Gradual reductions in SaO2 levels were observed, with significant differences (p<0.001) during the course of home bleaching treatment. However, 30 days after the end of the bleaching protocol, SaO2 levels returned to baseline levels. Home bleaching caused a reversible transient decrease in SaO2 levels in the pulps.


Resumo Este estudo verificou o grau de saturação de oxigênio (SaO2) pulpar antes, durante e após o clareamento dental caseiro em incisivos centrais superiores hígidos. O nível de SaO2 foi verificado em 136 incisivos centrais superiores hígidos usando oxímetro de pulso. A técnica de clareamento empregou peróxido de carbamida 10% em moldeira individual por quatro horas diárias durante 14 dias. Os níveis de SaO2 foram analisados antes do clareamento (T0), imediatamente após a primeira sessão (T1), no sétimo dia de tratamento (T2), no décimo quinto dia (um dia após a última sessão) (T3) e 30 dias após o término do clareamento dental (T4). A análise estatística utilizou o modelo de equações de estimações generalizadas (GEE), teste t de Student (p<0,05) e correlação de Pearson. Os níveis médios de SaO2 pulpar foram 85,1% em T0, 84,9% em T1, 84,7% em T2, 84,3% em T3 e 85,0% em T4. Foi observada uma redução gradual dos níveis de SaO2, com diferenças significantes (p<0,001) durante o clareamento dental caseiro. No entanto, 30 dias após o término do clareamento dental, houve retorno aos valores iniciais. O clareamento dental caseiro provocou uma diminuição transitória reversível no grau de SaO2 pulpar.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Oxygen/metabolism , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dental Pulp/metabolism , Carbamide Peroxide/pharmacology , Incisor/drug effects , Oximetry , Prospective Studies , Dental Pulp Test , Tooth Bleaching Agents/pharmacology , Maxilla
14.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32(supl.1): e68, 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974474

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Endodontic medicine, which addresses the bidirectional relationship between endodontic infections and systemic diseases, has gained prominence in the field of endodontics. There is much evidence showing that while systemic disease may influence the pathogenesis of endodontic infection, endodontic infection can also cause systemic alterations. These alterations include more severe bone resorption and inflammation in the periapical area as well as enhanced systemic disease symptoms. Similarly, many reports have described the impact of systemic diseases on the tissue responses to dental materials. Conversely, the local use of dental materials may show systemic effects in the form of altered production of biomarkers. Thus, studies to better understand the mechanisms related to those connections are extremely important. In this context, the objective of this review was to analyze and discuss the current literature regarding the connections among these three factors—systemic diseases, endodontic infection, and endodontic dental materials—and determine how these connections may interfere in the systemic health status and the endodontic treatment outcomes, which are represented by periapical wound healing.


Subject(s)
Humans , Periapical Periodontitis/physiopathology , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Oxides/pharmacology , Risk Factors , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp Diseases/physiopathology , Drug Combinations , Metabolic Diseases/physiopathology
15.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(6): 680-688, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893667

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: Methylcellulose (MC) is a chemical compound derived from cellulose. MTA mixed with MC reduces setting time and increases plasticity. This study assessed the influence of MC as an anti-washout ingredient and CaCl2 as a setting time accelerator on the physical and biological properties of MTA. Material and Methods: Test materials were divided into 3 groups; Group 1(control): distilled water; Group 2: 1% MC/CaCl2; Group 3: 2% MC/CaCl2. Compressive strength, pH, flowability and cell viability were tested. The gene expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) was detected by RT-PCR and real­ time PCR. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineralization behavior were evaluated using an ALP staining and an alizarin red staining. Results: Compressive strength, pH, and cell viability of MTA mixed with MC/CaCl2 were not significantly different compared to the control group. The flowability of MTA with MC/CaCI2 has decreased significantly when compared to the control (p<.05). The mRNA level of BSP has increased significantly in MTA with MC/CaCl2 compared to the control (p<.05). This study revealed higher expression of ALP and mineralization in cells exposed to MTA mixed with water and MTA mixed with MC/CaCl2 compared to the control (p<.05). Conclusions: MC decreased the flowability of MTA and did not interrupt the physical and biological effect of MTA. It suggests that these cements may be useful as a root-end filling material.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Oxides/pharmacology , Oxides/chemistry , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Calcium Chloride/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Silicates/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Methylcellulose/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Cells, Cultured/drug effects , Compressive Strength , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Drug Combinations
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(6): 631-640, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893662

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) on odontoclastic differentiation in the dental pulp tissue. Material and Methods: The effects of different TEGDMA dosages on the odontoclastic differentiation capability of dental pulp cells were analyzed in vitro using the following methodologies: i) flow cytometry and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining; ii) apoptotic effects using Annexin V staining; iii) mRNA expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kB ligand (RANKL) genes by quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR); and iv) OPG and RANKL protein expression by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: TEGDMA caused relatively less odontoclastic differentiation in comparison with the control group; however, odontoclastic differentiation augmented with increasing doses of TEGDMA (p<0.05). The mRNA and protein expression of OPG was lower in TEGDMA treated pulp cells than in the control group (p<0.05). While the mRNA expression of RANKL remained unchanged compared to the control group (p>0.05), its protein expression was higher than the control group (p<0.05). In addition, TEGDMA increased the apoptosis of dental pulp cells dose dependently. Conclusions: TEGDMA reduced the odontoclastic differentiation ability of human dental pulp cells. However, odontoclastic differentiation ratios increased proportionally with the increasing dose of TEGDMA.


Subject(s)
Humans , Polyethylene Glycols/pharmacology , Polymethacrylic Acids/pharmacology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase/drug effects , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/metabolism , Dental Pulp/cytology , RANK Ligand/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Flow Cytometry
17.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(5): 515-522, Sept.-Oct. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893656

ABSTRACT

Abstract Hypersensitivity, local irritative and cytotoxic effects are known for the chemical components of Syzygium aromaticum and Cinnamomum zeylanicum contained in dental materials. However, there is no intimate data in dentistry using the whole extracts of these plants and introducing new ones. Salvia triloba is a well-known anti-inflammatory plant that correspondingly could be used in several dental traumas. Objectives: We aimed to show and compare the effect of S. aromaticum, C. zeylanicum, and S. triloba extracts on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses. Material and Methods: Using xCELLigence, a real time monitoring system, we obtained a growth curve of DPSCs with different concentrations of the Extracts. A dose of 10 μg/mL was the most efficient concentration for vitality. Osteogenic differentiation and anti-inflammatory activities were determined by using an ELISA Kit to detect early and late markers of differentiation. Results: The level of osteonectin (ON, early osteogenic marker) decreased, which indicated that the osteogenic differentiation may be accelerated with addition of extracts. However, the level of osteocalcin (OCN, late osteogenic marker and sign of calcium granulation) differed among the extracts, in which S. aromaticum presented the highest value, followed by S. triloba and C. zeylanicum. Surprisingly, the determined calcium granules were reduced in S. aromaticum and S. triloba. In response to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), S. triloba-treated DPSCs showed the most reduced level of IL-6 cytokine level. We suggest C. zeylanicum as a promising osteogenic inducer and S. triloba as a potent anti-inflammatory agent, which could be used safely in biocomposite or scaffold fabrications for dentistry. Conclusions: Because calcium granule formation and cell viability play a critical role in hard tissue formation, S. aromaticum in dentistry should be strictly controlled, and the mechanism leading to reduced calcium granule formation should be identified.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Cinnamomum zeylanicum/chemistry , Syzygium/chemistry , Dental Pulp/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/drug effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Time Factors , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Antigens, Differentiation/analysis , Osteocalcin/analysis , Osteonectin/analysis , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Calcium/analysis , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Cytokines/analysis , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Flow Cytometry
18.
Bauru; s.n; 2017. 103 p. ilus, tab, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-880031

ABSTRACT

O desenvolvimento de biomateriais com aplicações na área da saúde mostram-se cada vez mais importantes e a procura por novos polímeros com propriedades bioativas, biodegradabilidade, atoxicidade são o foco das principais pesquisas em diferentes aplicações médicas e odontológicas. Os materiais capeadores pulpares evoluíram rapidamente na ultima década, sendo que são disponibilizadas atualmente diversas alternativas para uso clínico odontológico. Este trabalho teve como objetivo o desenvolvimento de um novo produto bioestimulador e capeador dentino/pulpar que poderá ser base para o desenvolvimento e recobrimento de scaffolds para reparo das diferentes estruturas dentárias. O desenvolvimento das bandagens BBio e os resultados obtidos nos testes das propriedades físico-químicas (absorção de água, perda de massa e pH), bem como as análises biológicas da morfologia celular e viabilidade celular com MTT a BBio apresentaram dados favoráveis e desejáveis para sua aplicação clínica. A propriedade de liberação de cálcio foi bastante promissora, sendo esta uma condição que dará a diferenciação positiva da BBio como um produto bioestimulador pulpar. Com esses dados pode-se concluir que a mesma se encontra dentro dos parâmetros desejados para o produto final e com propriedades semelhantes aos produtos existentes no mercado, de qualidade e aprovados pelas agências reguladoras.(AU)


The development of biomaterials with applications in the health area are increasingly important and the search for new polymers with bioactive properties, biodegradability and toxicity are the focus of the main researches in different medical and dental applications. The pulp capping materials evolved rapidly in the last decade, and several alternatives are now available for clinical dental use. This project aimed to develop a new biostimulating and dentin / pulp capping product that could be the basis for the development and recoating of "scaffolds" for repair of different dental structures. The development of the BBio bandages and the results obtained in the physical-chemical properties tests (water absorption, loss of mass and pH), as well as the biological analyzes of the cellular morphology and cell viability with MTT to BBio presented favorable and desirable data for its clinical application. The calcium release property was quite promising, and this is a condition that will give BBio a positive differentiation as a pulp biostimulator product. With this data it can be concluded that it is within the parameters desired for the final product and with properties similar to the products on the market, of quality and approved by the regulatory agencies.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Biocompatible Materials/chemistry , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/chemistry , Analysis of Variance , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/standards , Cell Survival , Chitin/chemistry , Chitosan/chemistry , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electrochemical, Scanning , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/pharmacology , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/standards , Reproducibility of Results , Time Factors
19.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e101, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952124

ABSTRACT

Abstract: This study aimed to systematically review the literature to address the question regarding the influence of different materials in the clinical and radiographic success of indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth. A literature search was carried out for articles published prior to January 2017 in PubMed/MEDLINE, CENTRAL, Scopus, TRIP and ClinicalTrials databases; relevant articles included randomized clinical trials that compared materials used for indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth. Two reviewers independently selected the studies and extracted the data. The effects of each material on the outcome (clinical and radiographic failures) were analyzed using a mixed treatment comparisons meta-analysis. The ranking of treatments according to their probability of being the best choice was also calculated. From 1,088 potentially eligible studies, 11 were selected for full-text analysis, and 4 were included in the meta-analysis. In all papers, calcium hydroxide liner was used as the control group versus an adhesive system, resin-modified glass ionomer cement or placebo. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 48 months, with dropout rates of 0-25.7%. The material type did not significantly affect the risk of failure of the indirect pulp treatment. However, calcium hydroxide presented a higher probability of failure. In conclusion, there is no scientific evidence showing the superiority of any material used for indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tooth, Deciduous/drug effects , Calcium Hydroxide/therapeutic use , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dental Pulp Capping/methods , Glass Ionomer Cements/therapeutic use , Gutta-Percha/therapeutic use , Tooth, Deciduous/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Dental , Treatment Outcome , Publication Bias , Dental Caries/therapy
20.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(5): 481-486, Sept.-Oct. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-797986

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxic effects of Biodentine and MTA on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and to assess cell viability and adherence after material exposure to an acidic environment. Material and Methods: DPSCs were cultured either alone or in contact with either: Biodentine; MTA set for 1 hour; or MTA set for 24 hours. After 4 and 7 days, cell viability was measured using the MTT assay. Biodentine and MTA were also prepared and packed into standardized bovine dentin disks and divided into three groups according to the storage media (n=6/group): freshly mixed materials without storage medium (Group A); materials stored in saline (Group B); materials stored in citric acid buffered at pH 5.4 (Group C). After 24 hours, DPSCs were introduced in the wells and cell adherence, viability, and cellular morphology were observed via confocal microscopy after three days of culture. Cell viability was analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance test with Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). Results: Biodentine expressed significantly higher cell viability compared with all other groups after 4 days, with no differences after 7 days. Notably, cell viability was significantly greater in 24-hour set MTA compared with 1-hour set MTA and control groups after 7 days. Material exposure to an acidic environment showed an increase in cell adherence and viability in both groups. Conclusions: Biodentine induced a significantly accelerated cell proliferation compared with MTA. Setting of these materials in the presence of citric acid enhanced DPSC viability and adherence.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Cattle , Oxides/toxicity , Stem Cells/drug effects , Silicates/toxicity , Calcium Compounds/toxicity , Aluminum Compounds/toxicity , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Root Canal Filling Materials/toxicity , Time Factors , Cell Adhesion/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Analysis of Variance , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Microscopy, Confocal , Citric Acid/chemistry , Culture Media/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Drug Combinations
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