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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880097

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of domestic imatinib (made in China) in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia chronic phase(CML-CP).@*METHODS@#Fifty-seven newly diagnosed CML-CP patients who did not receive any other anti-CML treatment were treated by domestic imatinib 400 mg once a day. The hematological, cytogenetic and molecular reactions and safety were observed and evaluated after 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment.@*RESULTS@#Fifty-six patients were treated for ≥3 and 6 months, among which 50 patients were treated for ≥12 months. After 3 months of treatment, 49 patients underwent hematological examination, 47 patients (95.9%) achieved complete hematological response (CHR), 49 patients underwent cytogenetic examination, 39 patients (79.6%) achieved major cytogenetic response (MCyR), and 12 patients (24.5%) achieved complete cytogenetic response (CCyR). 49 patients underwent the level of BCR-ABL test, including 41 patients (83.7%) with BCR-ABL@*CONCLUSION@#In the real world, Domestics imatinib mesylate is effective and safe in the treatment of newly diagnosed CML-CP patients, but long-term follow-up data are still necessary to verify its long-term efficacy.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Benzamides/therapeutic use , China , Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl/genetics , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive/drug therapy , Piperazines , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
2.
Rev. méd. Chile ; 148(7): 1039-1043, jul. 2020. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1139408

ABSTRACT

Biological therapy dramatically changed the management of Ulcerative Colitis (UC). However, a significant number of these patients fail to respond or have secondary loss of response to this strategy. In this clinical situation, the options include intensification of anti-TNF therapy, the use of a second anti-TNF or being switched to another drug class. Among the later, tofacitinib, an oral small molecule directed against the JAK/STAT pathway, is safe and effective in inducing and maintaining remission in patients with moderate-severe UC. We report two patients with UC refractory to conventional treatment and biological therapy, who responded successfully to the use of tofacitinib.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Colitis, Ulcerative/diagnostic imaging , Colonoscopy , Treatment Outcome
3.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 723-739, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828747

ABSTRACT

Emerging and re-emerging RNA viruses occasionally cause epidemics and pandemics worldwide, such as the on-going outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Herein, we identified two potent inhibitors of human DHODH, S312 and S416, with favorable drug-likeness and pharmacokinetic profiles, which all showed broad-spectrum antiviral effects against various RNA viruses, including influenza A virus, Zika virus, Ebola virus, and particularly against SARS-CoV-2. Notably, S416 is reported to be the most potent inhibitor so far with an EC of 17 nmol/L and an SI value of 10,505.88 in infected cells. Our results are the first to validate that DHODH is an attractive host target through high antiviral efficacy in vivo and low virus replication in DHODH knock-out cells. This work demonstrates that both S312/S416 and old drugs (Leflunomide/Teriflunomide) with dual actions of antiviral and immuno-regulation may have clinical potentials to cure SARS-CoV-2 or other RNA viruses circulating worldwide, no matter such viruses are mutated or not.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antiviral Agents , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Betacoronavirus , Physiology , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections , Drug Therapy , Virology , Crotonates , Pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Gene Knockout Techniques , Humans , Influenza A virus , Leflunomide , Pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Drug Therapy , Oseltamivir , Therapeutic Uses , Oxidoreductases , Metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Drug Therapy , Virology , Protein Binding , Pyrimidines , RNA Viruses , Physiology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Toluidines , Pharmacology , Ubiquinone , Metabolism , Virus Replication
4.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 723-739, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828583

ABSTRACT

Emerging and re-emerging RNA viruses occasionally cause epidemics and pandemics worldwide, such as the on-going outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Herein, we identified two potent inhibitors of human DHODH, S312 and S416, with favorable drug-likeness and pharmacokinetic profiles, which all showed broad-spectrum antiviral effects against various RNA viruses, including influenza A virus, Zika virus, Ebola virus, and particularly against SARS-CoV-2. Notably, S416 is reported to be the most potent inhibitor so far with an EC of 17 nmol/L and an SI value of 10,505.88 in infected cells. Our results are the first to validate that DHODH is an attractive host target through high antiviral efficacy in vivo and low virus replication in DHODH knock-out cells. This work demonstrates that both S312/S416 and old drugs (Leflunomide/Teriflunomide) with dual actions of antiviral and immuno-regulation may have clinical potentials to cure SARS-CoV-2 or other RNA viruses circulating worldwide, no matter such viruses are mutated or not.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antiviral Agents , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Betacoronavirus , Physiology , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections , Drug Therapy , Virology , Crotonates , Pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Gene Knockout Techniques , Humans , Influenza A virus , Leflunomide , Pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Drug Therapy , Oseltamivir , Therapeutic Uses , Oxidoreductases , Metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Drug Therapy , Virology , Protein Binding , Pyrimidines , RNA Viruses , Physiology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Toluidines , Pharmacology , Ubiquinone , Metabolism , Virus Replication
5.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 723-739, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-827018

ABSTRACT

Emerging and re-emerging RNA viruses occasionally cause epidemics and pandemics worldwide, such as the on-going outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Herein, we identified two potent inhibitors of human DHODH, S312 and S416, with favorable drug-likeness and pharmacokinetic profiles, which all showed broad-spectrum antiviral effects against various RNA viruses, including influenza A virus, Zika virus, Ebola virus, and particularly against SARS-CoV-2. Notably, S416 is reported to be the most potent inhibitor so far with an EC of 17 nmol/L and an SI value of 10,505.88 in infected cells. Our results are the first to validate that DHODH is an attractive host target through high antiviral efficacy in vivo and low virus replication in DHODH knock-out cells. This work demonstrates that both S312/S416 and old drugs (Leflunomide/Teriflunomide) with dual actions of antiviral and immuno-regulation may have clinical potentials to cure SARS-CoV-2 or other RNA viruses circulating worldwide, no matter such viruses are mutated or not.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antiviral Agents , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Betacoronavirus , Physiology , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections , Drug Therapy , Virology , Crotonates , Pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Gene Knockout Techniques , Humans , Influenza A virus , Leflunomide , Pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Drug Therapy , Oseltamivir , Therapeutic Uses , Oxidoreductases , Metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Drug Therapy , Virology , Protein Binding , Pyrimidines , RNA Viruses , Physiology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Toluidines , Pharmacology , Ubiquinone , Metabolism , Virus Replication
6.
Cad. Saúde Pública (Online) ; 35(8): e00108218, 2019. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019622

ABSTRACT

Resumo: O câncer renal é a 13ª neoplasia mais frequente no mundo. Entre 2012 e 2016, representou 1,48% das mortes por câncer no Brasil. A terapia de escolha para o tratamento de câncer renal metastático são os inibidores de tirosina quinase (ITK), sunitinibe e pazopanibe. Este artigo avalia o custo-efetividade do pazopanibe comparado ao sunitinibe no tratamento de câncer renal metastático. Foi realizada uma análise de custo-efetividade sob a perspectiva de um hospital federal do Sistema Único de Saúde. No modelo de árvore de decisão foram aplicados os desfechos de efetividade e segurança dos ITK. Os dados clínicos foram extraídos de prontuários e os custos diretos consultados em fontes oficiais do Ministério da Saúde. O custo de 10 meses de tratamento, englobando o valor dos ITK, procedimentos e manejo de eventos adversos, foi de R$ 98.677,19 para o pazopanibe e R$ 155.227,11 para o sunitinibe. Os medicamentos apresentaram efetividade estatisticamente equivalente e diferença estatisticamente significativa para o desfecho de segurança, no qual o pazopanibe obteve o melhor resultado. O pazopanibe, nesse contexto, é a tecnologia dominante quando os custos de tratamento são associados aos de manejo de eventos adversos.


Abstract: Renal cancer is the 13th most frequent neoplasm in the world. From 2010 to 2014, renal cancer accounted for 1.43% of cancer deaths in Brazil. The treatment of choice for metastatic renal cancer is tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) sunitinib and pazopanib. This article assesses cost-effectiveness between pazopanib and sunitinib in the treatment of metastatic renal cancer. A cost-effectiveness study was performed from the perspective of a federal hospital under the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). TKI effectiveness and safety outcomes were applied to the decision tree model. Clinical data were extracted from patient charts, and direct costs were consulted from official Ministry of Health sources. The cost of 10 months of treatment, including the costs of the TKI, procedures and management of adverse events, was BRL 98,677.19 for pazopanib and BRL 155,227.11 for sunitinib. The drugs displayed statistically equivalent effectiveness and statistically different safety outcomes, with pazopanib displaying better results. In this setting, pazopanib is the dominant technology when the treatment costs are analyzed together with the costs of managing adverse events.


Resumen: El cáncer renal es la 13ª neoplasia más frecuente en el mundo. Entre 2010 y 2014, representó un 1,43% de las muertes por cáncer en Brasil. La terapia de elección para el tratamiento de cáncer renal metastásico son los inhibidores de tirosina quinasa (ITK), sunitinib y pazopanib. Este artículo evalúa el costo-efectividad entre pazopanib y sunitinib en el tratamiento de cáncer renal metastásico. Se realizó un análisis de costo-efectividad desde la perspectiva de un hospital federal del Sistema Único de Salud. En el modelo de árbol de decisión se aplicaron los desenlaces de efectividad y seguridad de los ITK. Los datos clínicos se extrajeron de registros médicos, y los costos directos consultados en fuentes oficiales del Ministerio de Salud. El costo de 10 meses de tratamiento, englobando el valor de los ITK, procedimientos y gestión de eventos adversos, fue de BRL 98.677,19 con el pazopanib y BRL 155.227,11 con el sunitinib. Los medicamentos presentaron efectividad estadísticamente equivalente y diferencia estadísticamente significativa para el desenlace de seguridad, en el que el pazopanib obtuvo el mejor resultado. El pazopanib, en este contexto, es la tecnología dominante cuando los costes de tratamiento están asociados a los de la gestión de eventos adversos.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Pyrimidines/economics , Sulfonamides/economics , Cost-Benefit Analysis/statistics & numerical data , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/economics , Sunitinib/economics , Kidney Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/economics , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Sunitinib/administration & dosage , Indazoles , Middle Aged , National Health Programs , Neoplasm Metastasis , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage
8.
Arq. gastroenterol ; 55(2): 198-200, Apr.-June 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1038706

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Janus kinases inhibitors have already been incorporated into the management of immune-mediated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and are being investigated for the treatment of psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases, both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Tofacitinib is an oral small-molecule drug that inhibits Janus kinases 1, Janus kinases 3, and, to a lesser extent, Janus kinases 2. This inhibition ends up blocking signals for several inflammatory cytokines that are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and play a role in many immune signaling routes, including lymphocyte activation, function, and proliferation. We report a patient with active ulcerative colitis with primary non-response to three biologics (infliximab, adalimumab and vedolizumab), with different mechanisms of action, who refused surgical treatment and had a favorable response to tofacitinib with clinical and endoscopic remission. No adverse events were observed with the use of the agent. This case illustrates the difficulties we may face regarding the identification of the expression of proper mechanism of action involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis patients and the importance of having another treatment option with different mechanism of action, like tofacitinib.


RESUMO Os inibidores das Janus kinases (JAK) têm sido incorporados ao tratamento de doenças imunomediadas, como artrite reumatoide e, além disso, têm sido testados no tratamento da psoríase e doenças inflamatórias intestinais, tanto na retocolite ulcerativa quanto na doença de Crohn. Tofacitinibe é uma droga do grupo das pequenas moléculas de uso oral que inibe as Janus kinases 1 e 3 e, em menor grau, a Janus kinases 2. Esta inibição promove o bloqueio de uma série de citocinas pró-inflamatórias que estão envolvidas na patogênese das doenças inflamatórias intestinais e desempenham importante papel nos processos imunes, tais como ativação, função e proliferação linfocitária. Nesta presente comunicação, relatamos um caso de um paciente portador de retocolite ulcerativa refratária a três agentes biológicos (infliximabe, adalimumabe e vedolizumabe), com diferentes mecanismos de ação, que recusou o tratamento cirúrgico, porém, apresentou boa resposta com o uso de tofacitinibe, com remissão clínica e endoscópica. Não foram evidenciados efeitos colaterais com a droga. O presente caso ilustra as dificuldades que podemos enfrentar em relação à identificação da expressão do correto mecanismo de ação envolvido na patogênese dos pacientes com retocolite ulcerativa e a importância de um novo agente terapêutico com diferente mecanismo de ação, como o tofacitinibe.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Integrins/therapeutic use , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/therapeutic use , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Pyrroles/therapeutic use , Integrins/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Infliximab/therapeutic use
10.
Neuroscience Bulletin ; (6): 54-63, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-777080

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have shown that the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL10 in the dorsal root ganglion mediate itch in experimental allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). CXCR3 in the spinal cord also contributes to the maintenance of neuropathic pain. However, whether spinal CXCR3 is involved in acute or chronic itch remains unclear. Here, we report that Cxcr3 mice showed normal scratching in acute itch models but reduced scratching in chronic itch models of dry skin and ACD. In contrast, both formalin-induced acute pain and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain were reduced in Cxcr3 mice. In addition, the expression of CXCR3 and CXCL10 was increased in the spinal cord in the dry skin model induced by acetone and diethyl ether followed by water (AEW). Intrathecal injection of a CXCR3 antagonist alleviated AEW-induced itch. Furthermore, touch-elicited itch (alloknesis) after compound 48/80 or AEW treatment was suppressed in Cxcr3 mice. Finally, AEW-induced astrocyte activation was inhibited in Cxcr3 mice. Taken together, these data suggest that spinal CXCR3 mediates chronic itch and alloknesis, and targeting CXCR3 may provide effective treatment for chronic pruritus.


Subject(s)
Acetamides , Therapeutic Uses , Animals , Chemokine CXCL10 , Metabolism , Chloroquine , Toxicity , Chronic Disease , Cyclopropanes , Dehydration , Dinitrofluorobenzene , Disease Models, Animal , Formaldehyde , Toxicity , Freund's Adjuvant , Toxicity , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Motor Activity , Pain , Pruritus , Pathology , Pyrimidines , Therapeutic Uses , Receptors, CXCR3 , Genetics , Metabolism , Skin , Pathology , Spinal Cord , Metabolism , Pathology , Time Factors , p-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine , Toxicity
11.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2683-2692, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-775034

ABSTRACT

Background@#Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study assessed the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in Chinese patients with RA enrolled in Phase 3 and long-term extension (LTE) studies.@*Methods@#ORAL Sync was a 1-year, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 trial. Patients received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily (BID) or placebo advanced to tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg BID at 3 or 6 months. All patients remained on ≥1 background conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug. ORAL Sequel is an open-label LTE study (data-cut: March 2015; data collection and analyses were ongoing, and study database was not locked at the time of analysis; study was closed in 2017). Efficacy outcomes: American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20/50/70 response rates and Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-4 [ESR]). Patient- and physician-reported outcomes: Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Patient and Physician Global Assessment of Arthritis, and pain (visual analog scale). Safety was assessed throughout.@*Results@#ORAL Sync included 218 patients; 192 were subsequently enrolled into ORAL Sequel. In ORAL Sync, more patients achieved ACR20 (tofacitinib 5 mg BID, 67.4%; 10 mg BID, 70.6%; placebo, 34.1%) and DAS28-4 (ESR) <2.6 (tofacitinib 5 mg BID, 7.1%; 10 mg BID, 13.1%; placebo, 2.3%) with tofacitinib versus placebo at Month 6. Mean changes from baseline in HAQ-DI were greater with tofacitinib versus placebo at Month 6. In ORAL Sequel, efficacy was consistent to Month 48. Incidence rates for adverse events of special interest in tofacitinib-treated patients were similar to the global population.@*Conclusions@#Tofacitinib significantly reduced signs/symptoms and improved physical function and quality of life in Chinese patients with moderate-to-severely active RA up to Month 48. The safety profile was consistent with the global population.@*Clinical Trial Identifier@#NCT00856544 and NCT00413699.


Subject(s)
Administration, Oral , Adult , Aged , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Drug Therapy , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Piperidines , Therapeutic Uses , Protein Kinase Inhibitors , Therapeutic Uses , Pyrimidines , Therapeutic Uses , Pyrroles , Therapeutic Uses , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 51(2): e6373, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889016

ABSTRACT

Cyclosporin-A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant associated with acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Nephrotoxicity associated with CsA involves the increase in afferent and efferent arteriole resistance, decreased renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptor blockade with bosentan (BOS) and macitentan (MAC) antagonists on altered renal function induced by CsA in normotensive and hypertensive animals. Wistar and genetically hypertensive rats (SHR) were separated into control group, CsA group that received intraperitoneal injections of CsA (40 mg/kg) for 15 days, CsA+BOS and CsA+MAC that received CsA and BOS (5 mg/kg) or MAC (25 mg/kg) by gavage for 15 days. Plasma creatinine and urea, mean arterial pressure (MAP), RBF and renal vascular resistance (RVR), and immunohistochemistry for ET-1 in the kidney cortex were measured. CsA decreased renal function, as shown by increased creatinine and urea. There was a decrease in RBF and an increase in MAP and RVR in normotensive and hypertensive animals. These effects were partially reversed by ET-1 antagonists, especially in SHR where increased ET-1 production was observed in the kidney. Most MAC effects were similar to BOS, but BOS seemed to be better at reversing cyclosporine-induced changes in renal function in hypertensive animals. The results of this work suggested the direct participation of ET-1 in renal hemodynamics changes induced by cyclosporin in normotensive and hypertensive rats. The antagonists of ET-1 MAC and BOS reversed part of these effects.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Cyclosporine/toxicity , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Endothelin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Immunosuppressive Agents/toxicity , Urea/blood , Immunohistochemistry , Immunoblotting , Reproducibility of Results , Rats, Wistar , Creatinine/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Endothelin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Bosentan , Hemodynamics , Kidney/drug effects
13.
Braz. J. Pharm. Sci. (Online) ; 54(4): e00153, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1001583

ABSTRACT

Pyrimidine derivative 3 was afforded through the reaction of compound (1) with 5-ureidohydantion (2). Product 3 underwent a cyclization to produce fused pyrimidine derivative 7, although the latter product 7 was synthesized through one step via the reaction of compound (1) with 5-ureidohydantion (2) using another catalyst. Compound 3 was oriented to react with cyclic ketones 8a,b in the presence of elemental sulfur, salicylaldehyde (10), aryldiazonium chlorides 12a,b and ω-bromo-4-methoxy- acetophenone (14), which afforded, fused thiophene derivatives 9a,b, coumarin derivative 11, arylhdrazono derivatives 13a,b and 4-methoxyphenyl butenyl derivative 15, respectively. The latter product 15 was reacted with either potassium cyanide (16a) or potassium thiocyanide (16b) to form cyano and thiocyano derivatives 17a,b, respectively. Compound 17a underwent further cyclization to afford pyridopyrimidine derivative 19. Compound 15 was reacted with either hydrazine (20a) or phenylhydrazine (20b) to produce hydrazo derivatives 21a,b and these products were cyclize to produce pyrrole derivatives 23a,b. Finally, 5-ureidohydantion (2) was reacted with compounds 24a,b,c to afford pyrimidine derivatives 25a,b,c. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed using IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. Compounds 11 and 19 have promising as analgesic and antipyretic activities


Subject(s)
Pyridines/analysis , Pyrimidines/agonists , Pyrroles , Thiophenes/analysis , Coumarins/analysis , Antipyretics , Analgesics/classification
14.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-690976

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To explore the individualized treatment for patient with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia(CML-CP).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The clinical data and treatment process of one CML-CP patient which intolerated to nilotinib were analyzed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Nilotinib was given to the patient once the diagnosis of CML-CP was set. Although major molecular remission (MMR) and complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR) were obtained during treatment for 3 months, a grade 3-4 hepatotoxicity appeared in the course of treatment.With drug reduction and symptomatic treatment, nilotinib was discontinued after 3 withdrawals and replaced with imatinib in January 11, 2015. The patients achieved MMR and CCyR at 7 months after imatinib replacement. At present, the patient tolerated well without any adverse events.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Imatinib can be used as a second-line treatment drug for CML patients who was intolerant to nilotinib, and with less adverts, good effect and so on.</p>


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Benzamides , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive , Piperazines , Protein Kinase Inhibitors , Pyrimidines , Treatment Outcome
15.
Journal of Experimental Hematology ; (6): 1086-1092, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689524

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the effects and its potential mechanism of IKK2 inhibitor LY2409881 on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>CCK8 assay was used to detect the effect of LY2409881 on proliferation of DLBCL cell lines; Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle; Western blot was used to analyze apoptosis and its potential mechanism.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>LY2409881 inhibited the proliferation of multiple DLBCL cell lines obviously, and caused G cell arrest. Furtherly, LY2409881 inhibited the expression of c-FLIP, induced the activation of DR4 and caspase 8. Meanwhile, LY2409881 induced the expression of pro-apoptotic protein BAX and inhibited the expression of anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1 and BCL-2.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>LY2409881 inhibits the proliferation of DLBCL cell lines, causes G cell arrest and induces apoptosis via the endogenous and exogenous apoptotic pathways.</p>


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Humans , I-kappa B Kinase , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse , Pyrimidines , Thiophenes
16.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(3): 544-550, July-Sept. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889154

ABSTRACT

Abstract Presence of the relatively new sulfonylurea herbicide monosulfuron-ester at 0.03-300 nmol/L affected the growth of two non-target nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria (Anabaena flos-aquae and Anabaena azotica) and substantially inhibited in vitro Acetolactate synthase activity, with IC50 of 3.3 and 101.3 nmol/L for A. flos-aquae and A. azotica, respectively. Presenting in 30-300 nmol/L, it inhibited protein synthesis of the cyanobacteria with less amino acids produced as its concentration increased. Our findings support the view that monosulfuron-ester toxicity in both nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria is due to its interference with protein metabolism via inhibition of branch-chain amino acid biosynthesis, and particularly Acetolactate synthase activity.


Subject(s)
Pyrimidines/toxicity , Sulfonylurea Compounds/toxicity , Anabaena/drug effects , Anabaena/metabolism , Anabaena flos-aquae/drug effects , Anabaena flos-aquae/metabolism , Esters/toxicity , Herbicides/toxicity , Nitrogen Fixation/drug effects , Anabaena/genetics , Anabaena flos-aquae/genetics , Amino Acids/metabolism , Nitrogen/metabolism
17.
Biol. Res ; 50: 1, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-838973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration after vascular injury promotes the development of occlusive vascular disease. Therefore, an effective chemical agent to suppress aberrant proliferation and migration of VSMCs can be a potential therapeutic modality for occlusive vascular disease such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. To find an anti-proliferative chemical agent for VSMCs, we screened an in-house small molecule library, and the selected small molecule was further validated for its anti-proliferative effect on VSMCs using multiple approaches, such as cell proliferation assays, wound healing assays, transwell migration assays, and ex vivo aortic ring assay. RESULTS: Among 43 initially screened small molecule inhibitors of kinases that have no known anti-proliferative effect on VSMCs, a spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitor (BAY61-3606) showed significant anti-proliferative effect on VSMCs. Further experiments indicated that BAY61 attenuated the VSMC proliferation in both concentration- and time-dependent manner, and it also significantly suppressed the migration of VSMCs as assessed by both wound healing assays and transwell assays. Additionally, BAY61 suppressed the sprouting of VSMCs from endothelium-removed aortic rings. CONCLUSION: The present study identified a Syk kinase inhibitor as a potent VSMC proliferation and migration inhibitor and warrants further studies to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms, such as its primary target, and to validate its in vivo efficacy as a therapeutic agent for restenosis and atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Cell Movement/drug effects , Niacinamide/analogs & derivatives , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Syk Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/drug effects , Aorta, Thoracic/drug effects , Time Factors , Wound Healing/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Blotting, Western , Reproducibility of Results , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Niacinamide/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Cell Migration Assays , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/cytology
18.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 302-308, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-812769

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To explore the effect of the AXL expression on the chemosensitivity of prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells to docetaxel and possible mechanisms.@*METHODS@#Using Western blot, we examined the expressions of the AXL protein, p-AXL and Gas6 in the docetaxel-resistant PC-3 (PC-3-DR) and DU145 (DU145-DR) cells stimulated with gradually increased concentrations of docetaxel. We transfected the PC-3 and DU145 cells with negative NC ShRNA and AXL-ShRNA, respectively, which were confirmed to be effective, detected the proliferation, apoptosis and cycle distribution of the cells by CCK8, MTT and flow cytometry after treated with the AXL-inhibitor MP470 and/or docetaxel, and determined the expression of the ABCB1 protein in the PC-3-DR and DU145-DR cells after intervention with the AXL-inhibitor R428 and/or docetaxel.@*RESULTS@#The expression of the AXL protein in the PC-3 and DU145 cells was significantly increased after docetaxel treatment (P <0.05). The expressions AXL and p-AXL were remarkably higher (P <0.05) while that of Gas6 markedly lower (P <0.05) in the PC-3 and DU145 than in the PC-3-DR and DU145-DR cells. The inhibitory effect of docetaxel on the proliferation and its enhancing effect on the apoptosis of the PC-3 and DU145 cells were significantly decreased at 48 hours after AXL transfection (P <0.05). MP470 obviously suppressed the growth and promoted the apoptosis of the PC-3-DR and DU145-DR cells, with a higher percentage of the cells in the G2/M phase when combined with docetaxel than used alone (P <0.05). R428 markedly reduced the expression of ABCB1 in the PC-3-DR and DU145-DR cells, even more significantly in combination with docetaxel than used alone (P <0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#The elevated expression of AXL enhances the docetaxel-resistance of PC-3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells and AXL intervention improves their chemosensitivity to docetaxel, which may be associated with the increased cell apoptosis in the G2/M phase and decreased expression of ABCB1.


Subject(s)
ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 1 , Metabolism , Antineoplastic Agents , Pharmacology , Apoptosis , Cell Count , Cell Cycle , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Docetaxel , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Humans , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins , Metabolism , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms , Drug Therapy , Metabolism , Pathology , Proto-Oncogene Proteins , Genetics , Metabolism , Pyrimidines , Pharmacology , RNA, Small Interfering , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases , Genetics , Metabolism , Taxoids , Pharmacology
19.
An. bras. dermatol ; 91(5,supl.1): 45-47, Sept.-Oct. 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-837937

ABSTRACT

Abstract Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective as a target therapy for malignant neoplasms. Imatinib was the first tyrosine kinase inhibitor used. After its introduction, several other drugs have appeared with a similar mechanism of action, but less prone to causing resistance. Even though these drugs are selective, their toxicity does not exclusively target cancer cells, and skin toxicity is the most common non-hematologic adverse effect. We report an eruption similar to lichen planopilaris that developed during therapy with nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia resistant to imatinib. In a literature review, we found only one report of non-scarring alopecia due to the use of nilotinib.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Drug Eruptions/etiology , Drug Eruptions/pathology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Lichen Planus/pathology , Biopsy , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive/drug therapy , Alopecia/chemically induced , Alopecia/pathology , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects
20.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-303960

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to the occult onset, GIST may present as local advanced or with metastatic disease at diagnosis. Imatinib mesylate (IM) has effectively improved the prognosis of GIST patients and has been established as principle therapy in metastatic GIST. The role of IM as an adjunction to surgery in the management of high-risk and local advanced GIST is also highly regarded. The role of surgery in metastatic or recurrent GIST is still a controversial clinic problem. For local advanced GIST or GIST in the unfavorable anatomic site(e.g. esophagogastric junction, duodenum, and rectum), based on the limited evidence, surgery may have potential benefits as conversion therapy. Surgery may have a limited favorable impact on progression-free survival and overall survival for those patients whose disease is responding to imatinib or those with limited focal progression. Patients with extensive advanced relapse metastatic GIST or imatinib-resistant disease should not undergo surgery unless emergency situation or complication occurs, where palliative intervention may be justified.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Disease Progression , Disease-Free Survival , Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors , Drug Therapy , General Surgery , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Prognosis , Pyrimidines
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