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1.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 24(1): 13-24, Feb. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089334

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Dengue has been a significant public health problem in Colombia since the simultaneous circulation of the four dengue virus serotypes. The replicative fitness of dengue is a biological feature important for virus evolution and contributes to elucidating the behavior of virus populations and viral pathogenesis. However, it has not yet been studied in Colombian isolates. This study aimed to compare the replicative fitness of the four dengue virus serotypes and understand the association between the serotypes, their in vitro infection ability, and their replication in target cells. We used three isolates of each DENV serotype to infect Huh-7 cells at an MOI of 0.5. The percentage of infected cells was evaluated by flow cytometry, cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay, and the pathogenicity index was calculated as a ratio of both parameters. The replicative fitness was measured by the number of viral genome copies produced using quantitative PCR and the production of infectious viral progeny was measured by plaque assay. We showed that Huh-7 cells were susceptible to infection with all the different strain isolates. Nevertheless, the biological characteristics, such as infectious ability and cell viability, were strain-dependent. We also found different degrees of pathogenicity between strains of the four serotypes, representative of the heterogeneity displayed in the circulating population. When we analyzed the replicative fitness using the mean values obtained from RT-qPCR and plaque assay for the different strains, we found serotype-dependent behavior. The highest mean values of replicative fitness were obtained for DENV-1 (log 4.9 PFU/ml) and DENV-4 (log 5.28 PFU/ml), followed by DENV-2 (log 3.9 PFU/ml) and DENV-3 (log 4.31 PFU/ml). The internal heterogeneity of the replicative fitness within each serotype could explain the simultaneous circulation of the four DENV serotypes in Colombia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Virus Replication/genetics , Dengue Virus/genetics , Dengue Virus/pathogenicity , Serogroup , Viral Plaque Assay , Reference Values , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , RNA, Viral/genetics , Cell Line , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Colombia , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Flow Cytometry , Formazans , Liver/cytology
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(5): 916-924, Sept.-Dec. 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1040072

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective This study aims to investigate the association of filamin A with the function and morphology of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, and explore the role of filamin A in the development of PCa, in order to analyze its significance in the evolvement of PCa. Materials and Methods A stably transfected cell line, in which filamin A expression was suppressed by RNA interference, was first established. Then, the effects of the suppression of filamin A gene expression on the biological characteristics of human PCa LNCaP cells were observed through cell morphology, in vitro cell growth curve, soft agar cloning assay, and scratch test. Results A cell line model with a low expression of filamin A was successfully constructed on the basis of LNCaP cells. The morphology of cells transfected with plasmid pSilencer-filamin A was the following: Cells were loosely arranged, had less connection with each other, had fewer tentacles, and presented a fibrous look. The growth rate of LNCap cells was faster than cells transfected with plasmid pSilencer-filamin A (P <0.05). The clones of LNCap cells in the soft agar cloning assay was significantly fewer than that of cells stably transfected with plasmid pSilencer-filamin A (P <0.05). Cells stably transfected with plasmid pSilencer-filamin A presented with a stronger healing and migration ability compared to LNCap cells (healing rate was 32.2% and 12.1%, respectively; P <0.05). Conclusion The expression of the filamin A gene inhibited the malignant development of LNCap cells. Therefore, the filamin A gene may be a tumor suppressor gene.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Filamins/analysis , Filamins/physiology , Plasmids , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Wound Healing/physiology , Transfection/methods , Cells, Cultured , Blotting, Western , Colorimetry/methods , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Filamins/genetics , Formazans
3.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180396, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1002404

ABSTRACT

Abstract Endodontic revascularization is based on cell recruitment into the necrotic root canal of immature teeth after chemical disinfection. The clinical outcome depends on the ability of surviving cells from the apical tissue to differentiate and promote hard tissue deposition inside the dentinal walls. Objective To investigate the effect of calcium hydroxide (CH) and modified triple antibiotic paste (mTAP - ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and cefaclor) on the viability and mineralization potential of apical papilla cells (APC) in vitro . Material and Methods APC cultures were kept in contact with CH or mTAP (250-1000 µg/mL) for 5 days, after which cell viability was assessed using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Next, APCs were subjected to CH or mTAP at 250 µg/mL for 5 days before inducing the differentiation assay. After 14 and 21 days, calcium deposition was assessed by the Alizarin Red S staining method, followed by elution and quantification using spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc test. Results CH induced cell proliferation, whereas mTAP showed significant cytotoxicity at all concentrations tested. APC treated with CH demonstrated improved mineralization capacity at 14 days, while, for mTAP, significant reduction on the mineralization rate was observed for both experimental periods (14 and 21 days). Conclusion Our findings showed that CH induces cell proliferation and improves early mineralization, whereas mTAP was found cytotoxic and reduced the mineralization potential in vitro of APCs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/pharmacology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Dental Papilla/cytology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology , Cefaclor/pharmacology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Dental Papilla/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Formazans , Metronidazole/pharmacology
4.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 51(1): e6858, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889001

ABSTRACT

A novel heterometallic metal-porphyrinic framework (MPFs) built from Y and K ions as nods and meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin as linkers has been successfully synthesized and characterized. The single crystal X-ray diffraction indicated that this complex 1 exhibited a bilayered architecture of the porphyrins, which is seldom seen in MPFs. In addition, in vitro anticancer activity of complex 1 on three human breast cancer cells (BT474, SKBr-3 and ZR-75-30) was further determined.


Subject(s)
Humans , Porphyrins/chemistry , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Metal-Organic Frameworks/pharmacology , Metal-Organic Frameworks/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Reference Values , Tetrazolium Salts , Reproducibility of Results , Crystallography, X-Ray , Cell Line, Tumor , Coordination Complexes/pharmacology , Coordination Complexes/chemistry , Formazans
5.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20160608, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954490

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective Relacin is a synthetic molecule that targets RelA, an essential protein in a conserved bacterial stress response system. It was shown to inhibit bacterial growth. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of relacin combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms and to evaluate the cytotoxicity of relacin. Material and Methods 48-h E. faecalis OG1RF biofilms were treated by various concentrations of relacin in order to determine its inhibitory concentration. Then, the 48-h biofilms were treated either with 1-min NaOCl (0.01%, 0.05%) alone, or in combination of relacin. As a means of comparison, the biofilms of ΔrelA were also treated by 1-min NaOCl (0.01%, 0.05%, 0.25%). The treatment efficacy was determined by agar plate count assays. The cytotoxicity of relacin was examined on human gingival epithelial cells Ca9-22 and murine fibroblasts NIH-3T3 by a methyl thiazolyltetrazolium (MTT) assay and a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni's post-hoc test and an independent Student's t-test. A significance level of p<0.05 was used. Results Relacin inhibited the growth of OG1RF biofilms partially at 8 mM and fully at 14 mM. The relacin (14 mM) and NaOCl combined treatment resulted in significantly higher treatment efficacy than NaOCl treatment alone. At 0.05% NaOCl, the combined treatment resulted in 5.65 (±0.19) log reduction in biofilm viability. The ΔrelA biofilms were more susceptible to NaOCl treatment than the wild type biofilms at 0.25% NaOCl. Relacin at 14 mM was not toxic to host epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Conclusions The combination of relacin with a low concentration of NaOCl was effective and not cytotoxic.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Biofilms/drug effects , Deoxyguanosine/analogs & derivatives , Dipeptides/pharmacology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Colony Count, Microbial , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Enterococcus faecalis/physiology , Biofilms/growth & development , NIH 3T3 Cells/drug effects , Deoxyguanosine/pharmacology , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Formazans , Gingiva/cytology
6.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20160594, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893697

ABSTRACT

Abstract Denture adhesives (DA) improve the retention and stability of ill-fitting dentures, especially for older adults. These materials should be biocompatible, i.e., they cannot cause undesired biological responses and be non-cytotoxic to oral tissues. However, in vitro testing of DA biocompatibility employing primary cell culture may possibly be affected by other factors, such as the donor age. Objective To compare the cytotoxicity of three different denture adhesives when assessed in primary gingival fibroblasts from a young donor or from an older donor, as well as the release of the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and the inflammatory response marker interleukin-6 (IL-6). Material and Methods Gingival fibroblasts isolated from a 30- and a 62-year-old donor were assayed for proliferation (1-7 days) and sensitivity to latex (positive control). Fibroblasts were indirectly exposed to Corega Ultra (cream), Corega powder and Fixodent Original for a 24 h period and assayed by XTT and Crystal Violet tests. The release of IL-6 and bFGF by exposed cells was determined by ELISA. Results While cells from the young donor presented higher cell growth after 7 days, the sensitivity to increasing concentrations of latex extracts was very similar between young and older cells. Both XTT and CVDE detected no difference between the DA and the control group. All materials induced higher levels of IL-6 and bFGF compared to control. Cells from the older donor exposed to Corega Ultra released lower levels of cytokine and growth factor. Conclusions All materials were considered non-cytotoxic, but affected cytokine and growth factor release. The biological differences found between fibroblasts from both donors could be due to individual or age-related factors. The authors suggest the use of cells from older donors on studies of dental products aimed at older patients, to better simulate their physiological response.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Polymers/toxicity , Dental Cements/toxicity , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Gingiva/cytology , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Cell Count , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2/analysis , Age Factors , Interleukin-6/analysis , Statistics, Nonparametric , Formazans , Gentian Violet , Gingiva/drug effects , Middle Aged
7.
An. acad. bras. ciênc ; 89(1): 31-43, Jan,-Mar. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886638

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT In Mexican Traditional Medicine 187 plant species are used in the treatment of respiratory conditions that may be associated with tuberculosis. In this contribution, we review the ethnobotany, chemistry and pharmacology of 63 species whose extracts have been assayed for antimycobacterial activity in vitro. Among these, the most potent is Aristolochia brevipes (MIC= 12.5 µg/mL), followed by Aristolochia taliscana, Citrus sinensis, Chrysactinia mexicana, Persea americana, and Olea europaea (MIC<64 µg/mL). Other potent extracts (inhibition > 95%, 50 µg/mL) include: Amphipterygium adstringens, Larrea divaricata, and Phoradendron robinsoni. Several active compounds have been identified, the most potent are: Licarin A (isolated from A. taliscana), and 9-amino-9-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[h]-chromen-2-one (transformation product of 9-methoxytariacuripyrone isolated from Aristolochia brevipes), both with MIC= 3.125 µg/mL, that is 8-fold less potent than the reference drug Rifampicin (MIC= 0.5 µg/mL). Any of the compounds or extracts here reviewed has been studied in clinical trials or with animal models; however, these should be accomplished since several are active against strains resistant to common drugs.


Subject(s)
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , Antitubercular Agents/chemistry , Tetrazolium Salts , Colony Count, Microbial , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Ethnobotany , Formazans , Mexico , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(1): 10-19, Jan.-Feb. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-841166

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) combined with a modified α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) or gelatin sponge (GS) scaffolds for bone healing in a rat model. Material and Methods Bone defects were surgically created in the femur of adult SHR rats and filled with the scaffolds, empty or combined with ASCs. The results were analyzed by histology and histomorphometry on days seven, 14, 30, and 60. Results Significantly increased bone repair was observed on days seven and 60 in animals treated with α-TCP/ASCs, and on day 14 in the group treated with GS/ASCs, when compared with the groups treated with the biomaterials alone. Intense fibroplasia was observed in the group treated with GS alone, on days 14 and 30. Conclusions Our results showed that the use of ASCs combined with α-TCP or GS scaffolds resulted in increased bone repair. The higher efficacy of the α-TCP scaffold suggests osteoconductive property that results in a biological support to the cells, whereas the GS scaffold functions just as a carrier. These results confirm the potential of ASCs in accelerating bone repair in in vivo experimental rat models. These results suggest a new alternative for treating bone defects.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Calcium Phosphates/pharmacology , Adipose Tissue/cytology , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Tissue Scaffolds , Gelatin Sponge, Absorbable/pharmacology , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Rats, Inbred SHR , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Wound Healing/drug effects , Biocompatible Materials/therapeutic use , Calcium Phosphates/therapeutic use , Cell Adhesion/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Models, Animal , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Femur/surgery , Femur/pathology , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Formazans , Gelatin Sponge, Absorbable/therapeutic use
9.
Biol. Res ; 50: 24, 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential effects of the 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl) porphyrin (TMPyP4) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms by which TMPyP4 exerted its actions. RESULTS: After human cervical cancer cells were treated with different doses of TMPyP4, cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method, the apoptosis was observed by flow cytometry (FCM), and the expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphated p38 MAPK (p-p38 MAPK), capase-3, MAPKAPK2 (MK-2) and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) was measured by Western blot analysis. The analysis revealed that TMPyP4 potently suppressed cell viability and induced the apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the up-regulation of p-p38 MAPK expression levels was detected in TMPyP4-treated human cervical cancer cells. However, followed by the block of p38 MAPK signaling pathway using the inhibitor SB203580, the effects of TMPyP4 on proliferation and apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells were significantly changed. CONCLUSIONS: It was indicated that TMPyP4-inhibited proliferation and -induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells was accompanied by activating the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrates that TMPyP4 may represent a potential therapeutic method for the treatment of cervical carcinoma.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Porphyrins/pharmacology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/drug therapy , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Tetrazolium Salts , HeLa Cells/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Blotting, Western , Reproducibility of Results , Apoptosis/drug effects , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , Caspase 3/analysis , Formazans
10.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 50(12): e6145, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-888968

ABSTRACT

Chronic systemic inflammation and repetitive damage of vascular endothelia by incompatible dialysis system are probable causes of cardiovascular disease in patients on dialysis. The present study aimed to assess in vitro biocompatibility and anti-inflammatory effect of hemodialysis fluid supplemented with rosmarinic acid (RA) using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVECs (5×106 cells/mL) were pre-exposed to 1 μg/mL of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and incubated with RA-supplemented hemodialysis fluid (HDF). Cytotoxicity was assessed qualitatively by morphologic assessment and quantitatively by MTT assay. Expressions of proinflammatory mediators were assessed using quantitative real-time PCR and production of NO was quantified. Phosphorylation of AKT and nuclear localization of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) were examined using western blotting. Exposure of HUVECs to RA-supplemented HDF had no influence on morphology and viability. Inhibition of proinflammatory mediator production in HUVECs by RA supplementation to HDF was significant in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to RA-supplemented HDF resulted in a decrease in nitric oxide synthase expression and reduction of NO production in LPS-stimulated HUVECs. RA supplementation of HDF suppressed Akt activation in LPS-stimulated HUVECs. In addition, the level of cellular IκB was increased in parallel to a reduced nuclear translocation of NF-κB in LPS-induced endothelial cells. Our results suggest that RA-supplemented HDF is biocompatible and significantly suppressed inflammation induced in endothelial cells. In this respect, the use of HDF supplemented with RA could alleviate inflammation and improve long-term treatment of patients with renal failure on dialysis. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the effects.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Cinnamates/pharmacology , Depsides/pharmacology , Hemodialysis Solutions/pharmacology , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Analysis of Variance , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/drug effects , Formazans , Hemodialysis Solutions/chemistry , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Immunoblotting , Inflammation/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides , NF-kappa B/analysis , Nitric Oxide/analysis , Phosphorylation , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reproducibility of Results , Tetrazolium Salts
11.
Rev. biol. trop ; 64(3): 1201-1208, jul.-sep. 2016. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-958206

ABSTRACT

ResumenLa resistencia bacteriana es un problema de salud creciente a nivel mundial que genera graves impactos económicos y sociales, comprometiendo la acción terapéutica de los antibióticos actuales. Por ello, la búsqueda de nuevos compuestos con propiedades antimicrobianas se hace más relevante en los estudios modernos, en especial frente a bacterias de interés clínico. En el presente estudio se evaluó la actividad antibacteriana in vitro del extracto etanólico y el aceite esencial de Curcuma longa L (Zingiberaceae), contra bacterias nosocomiales utilizando el método de microdilución. Se utilizaron cepas de Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus sp., Salmonella sp. y Bacillus sp., aisladas de infecciones nosocomiales en un centro hospitalario de la ciudad de Montería y cepas de referencia de S. aureus ATCC 43300, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 25923, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, E. coli ATCC 25922 y K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603. El perfil antibacterial del extracto etanólico fue más evidente a las concentraciones más altas (1 000 ppm), obteniendo porcentajes de reducción significativos de más del 50 % frente a K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 y un aislado clínico de E. coli, mientras que, frente al aislado clínico del género Bacillus fue más activo el aceite esencial. Para el resto de los microorganismos los porcentajes de reducción obtenidos a una concentración de 1 000 ppm variaron entre 17 y 42 % con el extracto etanólico y entre 8 y 43 % con el aceite esencial. A concentraciones de 100 y 500 ppm la actividad antibacteriana de los extractos fue menor. Los resultados obtenidos indican que el extracto etanólico y el aceite esencial de los rizomas de C. longa poseen compuestos activos con propiedades antibacterianas que podrían emplearse en investigaciones futuras, como una alternativa terapéutica para el tratamiento de infecciones producidas por patógenos nosocomiales.


Abstract:Bacterial resistance is a growing health problem worldwide that has serious economic and social impacts, compromising public health, and the therapeutic action of current antibiotics. Therefore, the search for new compounds with antimicrobial properties is relevant in modern studies, particularly against bacteria of clinical interest. In the present study, in vitro antibacterial activity of the ethanol extract and essential oil of Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae) was evaluated against nosocomial bacteria, using the microdilution method. Escherichia coli strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus sp. were used, Salmonella sp. and Bacillus sp., isolated from nosocomial infections in a hospital in the city of Monteria and reference strains of S. aureus ATCC 43300, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 25923, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, E. coli ATCC 25922 and K. pneumonia ATCC 700603. The ethanol extract antibacterial profile was more efficient at higher concentrations (1 000 ppm), obtaining significant percentages of reduction of more than 50 % against K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 and a clinical isolate of E. coli; while compared to Bacillus clinical isolate, was more active than the essential oil. For the rest of microorganisms, the reduction percentages obtained at a concentration of 1 000 ppm varied between 17 and 42 % with ethanolic extract, and 8 to 43 % with essential oil. At concentrations of 100 and 500 ppm antibacterial activity of the extracts was lower. The results indicated that the ethanolic extract and essential oil of C. longa rhizomes have active compounds with antibacterial properties that could be used in future research as a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of infections caused by nosocomial pathogens. Rev. Biol. Trop. 64 (3): 1201-1208. Epub 2016 September 01.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Cross Infection/microbiology , Curcuma/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Tetrazolium Salts , Bacteria/growth & development , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results , Colombia , Ethanol/chemistry , Formazans
12.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(4): 332-337, July-Aug. 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-792592

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Low-Level Laser Therapy stimulates the proliferation of a variety of types of cells. However, very little is known about its effect on stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). Objective This study aimed to evaluate the influence of different laser therapy energy densities on SHED viability and proliferation. Material and Methods SHED were irradiated according to the groups: I (1.2 J/cm2 - 0.5 mW – 10 s), II (2.5 J/cm2 – 10 mW – 10 s), III (3.7 J/cm2 – 15 mW – 10 s), IV (5.0 J/cm2 – 20 mW – 10 s), V (6.2 J/cm2 – 25 mW – 10 s), and VI (not irradiated – control group). Cell viability was assessed 6 and 24 h after irradiation measuring the mitochondrial activity and using the Crystal Violet assay. Cell proliferation was assessed after 24, 48, and 72 h of irradiation by SRB assay. Results MTT assay demonstrated differences from 6 to 24 hours after irradiation. After 24 h, groups I and IV showed higher absorbance values than those of control group. Crystal Violet assay showed statistically differences in the absorbance rate from 6 to 24 h after irradiation for groups III and VI. At 24 h after irradiation, Group III absorbance rate was greater than that of groups I, II, and IV. Group VI absorbance rate was greater than that of groups I and IV. SRB assay showed that the group I had higher rates than those of groups II, III, V, and VI, at 24 h after irradiation. After 48 h, group I exhibited the greatest cell proliferation rate followed by groups III, V, and VI. After 72 h, group III exhibited the lowest cell proliferation rate than those of groups II, IV, and V. Conclusions The Low-Level Laser Therapy energy densities used in this study did not cause loss of cell viability and stimulated SHED proliferation within the parameters described in this study.


Subject(s)
Humans , Stem Cells/radiation effects , Tooth, Deciduous/cytology , Tooth, Deciduous/radiation effects , Tooth Exfoliation , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Radiation Dosage , Rhodamines , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Cell Survival/radiation effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Cell Proliferation/radiation effects , Formazans
13.
Arq. bras. oftalmol ; 79(3): 180-185, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-787334

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: To culture quiescent human keratocytes and evaluate the effects of ultraviolet light and riboflavin on human corneal keratocytes in vitro. Methods: Keratocytes were obtained from remaining corneoscleral ring donor corneas previously used in corneal transplant surgeries and cultured in DMEM/F12 with 2% FBS until confluence. Characterization of cultured cells was performed by immunofluorescence analysis for anti-cytokeratin-3, anti-Thy-1, anti-α-smooth muscle actin, and anti-lumican. Immunofluorescence was performed before and after treatment of cultured cells with either ultraviolet light or riboflavin. Corneal stromal cells were covered with collagen (200 µL or 500 µL) and 0.1% riboflavin, and then exposed to ultraviolet light at 370 nm for 30 minutes. After 24 hours, cytotoxicity was determined using MTT colorimetric assays, whereas cell viability was assessed using Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. Results: Cell cultures achieved confluence in approximately 20 days. Expression of the lumican was high, whereas no expression of CK3, Thy-1, and α-SMA was observed. After crosslinking, MTT colorimetric assays demonstrated a low toxicity rate, whereas Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining demonstrated a low rate of apoptosis and necrosis, respectively, in all collagen-treatment groups. Conclusion: Keratocytes can be successfully cultured in vitro and characterized by immunofluorescence using lumican. MTT colorimetric assays, and Hoechst 33342, and propidium iodide staining demonstrated a higher rate of cell death in cells cultured without collagen, indicating collagen protects keratocytes from the cytotoxic effects of ultraviolet light.


RESUMO Objetivo: Avaliar o efeito da aplicação da luz ultravioleta e riboflavina sobre ceratócitos da córnea humana in vitro. Métodos: Os ceratócitos foram obtidos a partir das rimas corneoesclerais remanescentes da trepanação de córneas previamente utilizadas em cirurgias de transplante de córnea e cultivadas em meio DMEM/F12 com 2% de FBS até atingir confluência. As culturas de células foram caracterizadas por imunofluorescência com os anticorpos K3 (marcador de células epiteliais), Thy-1 (marcador de fibroblasto) SMA (marcador de miofibroblasto) e Lumican (marcador de ceratócitos). Imunofluorescência também foi feita após o tratamento. As células do estroma da córnea foram cobertas com colágeno (200 µL e 500 µL) e 0,1% de riboflavina e exposta a luz UVA a 370 nm por 30 minutos. Após 24 horas, citotoxicidade foi determinada por ensaio de MTT e a viabilidade celular foi feita por Hoechst 33342/Iodeto de propideo. Resultados: As culturas de células atingiram confluência em aproximadamente 20 dias. Imunofluorescência apontou alta expressão para o marcador de ceratócitos (Lumican) e expressão negativa par os marcadores de células epiteliais (K3), fibroblasto (Thy-1) e miofibroblasto (α-SMA). Após o cross linking a análise de MTT mostrou baixa taxa de toxicidade e com a coloração de Hoechst 33342/Iodeto de propideo baixa taxa de apoptose e necrose respectivamente em todos os grupos que continham colágeno. Conclusão: As culturas de ceratócitos foram obtidas e caracterizadas por imunofluorescência através do marcador Lumican com sucesso. O ensaio de MTT e a coloração por Hoechst 33342 e iodeto de propídio, apresentaram maior índice de morte celular nos grupos que não continham colágeno, provando que protege as células contra os efeitos da luz UVA.


Subject(s)
Humans , Riboflavin/pharmacology , Ultraviolet Rays , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Corneal Keratocytes/drug effects , Corneal Keratocytes/radiation effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cell Survival/radiation effects , Cells, Cultured , Analysis of Variance , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Collagen/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/radiation effects , Corneal Stroma/cytology , Cross-Linking Reagents/pharmacology , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Fibroblasts/radiation effects , Formazans , Necrosis
14.
Chinese Journal of Stomatology ; (12): 160-165, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-259424

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To determine the effect of aspirin on cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, cell cycle and apoptosis in murine bone marrow stromal cells, so as to explore an appropriate dose range to improve bone regeneration in periodontal treatment.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>ST2 cells were stimulated with aspirin (concentrations of 1, 10, 100 and 1 000 μmol/L) for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 d. Cell proliferation was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. After ST2 cells were treated for 1, 3 and 7 d, ALP activity was measured by ALP kit, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry (FCM) after treated for 48 h.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>MTT assays showed that various doses of aspirin have different effects on the cell growth. Briefly, lower concentrations (1, 10 μmol/L) of aspirin promoted the cell growth, the A value of 0, 1 and 10 μmol/L aspirin 7-day-treated cells were 0.313±0.012, 0.413±0.010 and 0.387±0.017 respectively (P <0.01 vs control), and so did the ALP level ([4.3±0.9], [6.0±0.3] and [7.7±0.4] μmol·min(-1)·g(-1), P <0.05 vs control), while higher concentrations, especially 1000 μmol/L of aspirin might inhibit the cell growth with time going, A value and ALP level were 0.267±0.016, (4.3±1.3) μmol·min(-1)·g(-1) respectively (P <0.05 vs control). Cell cycle analysis revealed no changes in comparison to control cells after treatment with 1 or 10 μmol/L aspirin, but it was observed that cell mitosis from S phase to G2/M phase proceeded at higher concentrations of 100 μmol/L aspirin, and the cell cycle in phase G0/G1 arrested at 1000 μmol/L. Parallel apoptosis/necrosis studies showed that the percentage of cells in apoptosis decreased dramatically at all doses of aspirin, the apoptosis rates of ST2 cells responded to 0, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 μmol/L aspirin were (11.50±0.90)%, (5.30±0.10)%, (5.50±0.10)%, (4.90±0.90)% and (7.95±0.25)% respectively (P<0.05 vs control).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>This study demonstrated that lower dosage of aspirin can promote ST2 cells growth, osteogenic activity and inhibit its apoptosis. Aspirin maybe used for the bone reconstruction with a proper concentration.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Alkaline Phosphatase , Metabolism , Apoptosis , Aspirin , Pharmacology , Bone Regeneration , Cell Cycle , Cell Division , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Flow Cytometry , Formazans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Periodontics , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors
15.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e48, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952020

ABSTRACT

Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2) of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC) and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM) and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1) (CSCR 2) (CSCR3). The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT-) was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+) used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni's posttest (p < 0.05), and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05). The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.


Subject(s)
Humans , Osteoblasts/drug effects , Silicates/toxicity , Calcium Compounds/toxicity , Dental Cements/toxicity , Oxides/toxicity , Tetrazolium Salts , Biocompatible Materials/toxicity , Materials Testing , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Apoptosis/drug effects , Aluminum Compounds/toxicity , Comet Assay , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Drug Combinations , Formazans , Necrosis/chemically induced
16.
Biol. Res ; 49: 1-6, 2016. ilus, graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950848

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Trichosanthin produced in the root tube of Trichosanthes kirilowii shows anti-tumor activity on a series of cancer cells including Hela, MCF-7, HL-60. But there is little information about its effect on the carcinogenesis of prostate cancer. OBJECTIVE: This work was designed to study the role of trichosanthin on prostate cancer cells PC3. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Trichosanthin was expressed in BL21 strain and purified by affinity chromatography. MTT assay was designed to determine the effect of trichosanthin on growth of PC3 cells at doses of 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 µg/ml.Then the effect of 50 µg/ml rTCS alone or combined with 2 µM IL-2 on PC3 cell proliferation was analyzed. And the mechanism of rTCS was studied by western blot. After that the in vivo effect of rTCS combined with IL-2 was explored in mice bearing PC3 xenograft tumor. RESULTS: Trichosanthin was successfully expressed in BL21 and purified by 100 mM imidazole. It was shown to inhibit proliferation of PC3 cells in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 50.6 µg/ml. When combined with cytokine IL-2, a significant synergic effect was obtained. The inhibition rate on PC3 was around 50 % in combination group while only 35.5 % in single rTCS group at 50 µg/ml. Further, the expression of full length caspase-8 and Bcl-2 decreased significantly while cleaved caspase-8 and Bax were up-regulated, which suggest that caspase-8-mediated apoptosis pathway may be activated by rTCS in PC3 cells. Moreover, our data demonstrated that tumor volume and tumor weight were significantly reduced in rTCS-treated or rTCS/IL-2-treated nude mice bearing PC3 xenograft tumor compared with control. And significant difference was also found between rTCS and rTCS/IL-2 group. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that rTCS is a potential agent with high in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity on PC3 cells. And rTCS combined with IL-2 is a promising strategy in treating patients with prostate cancer in future.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Mice , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Trichosanthin/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , Blotting, Western , Reproducibility of Results , Apoptosis/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Tumor Burden , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Formazans
17.
Biol. Res ; 49: 1-10, 2016. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950834

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Aged garlic extract (AGE) and its main constituent S-allylcysteine (SAC) are natural antioxidants with protective effects against cerebral ischemia or cancer, events that involve hypoxia stress. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) has been used to mimic hypoxic conditions through the stabilization of the α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and up-regulation of HIF-1α-dependent genes as well as activation of hypoxic conditions such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis. The present study was designed to assess the effect of AGE and SAC on the CoCl2-chemical hypoxia model in PC12 cells. RESULTS: We found that CoCl2 induced the stabilization of HIF-1α and its nuclear localization. CoCl2 produced ROS and apoptotic cell death that depended on hypoxia extent. The treatment with AGE and SAC decreased ROS and protected against CoCl2-induced apoptotic cell death which depended on the CoCl2 concentration and incubation time. SAC or AGE decreased the number of cells in the early and late stages of apoptosis. Interestingly, this protective effect was associated with attenuation in HIF-1α stabilization, activity not previously reported for AGE and SAC. CONCLUSIONS: Obtained results show that AGE and SAC decreased apoptotic CoCl2-induced cell death. This protection occurs by affecting the activity of HIF-1α and supports the use of these natural compounds as a therapeutic alternative for hypoxic conditions


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Cysteine/analogs & derivatives , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/drug effects , Garlic/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Tetrazolium Salts , Cell Hypoxia/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Analysis of Variance , PC12 Cells , Reactive Oxygen Species/analysis , Cobalt , Cysteine/pharmacology , Flow Cytometry , Formazans
18.
Biol. Res ; 49: 1-8, 2016. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950853

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Zinc finger RNA binding protein (ZFR) is involved in the regulation of growth and cancer development. However, little is known about ZFR function in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Herein, to investigate whether ZFR is involved in tumor growth, Oncomine microarray data was firstly used to evaluate ZFR gene expression in human pancreatic tumors. Then short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting ZFR was designed and delivered into PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells to knock down ZFR expression. Cell viability, cell proliferation and cell cycle analysis after ZFR knockdown were determined by MTT, colony forming and FACS, respectively. In addition, cell migration and invasion were assessed using the Transwell system. RESULTS: The expression of ZFR was significantly higher in pancreatic tumors than normal pancreas tissues by Oncomine database analysis. Knockdown of ZFR by shRNA-expressing lentivirus significantly decreased the viability and invasion ability of pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, FACS analysis showed that knockdown of ZFR in PANC-1 cells caused a significant cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, knockdown of ZFR decreased the levels of CDK2, CDK4, CyclinA and CyclinD1 and enhanced the expression of p27, which has evidenced by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Knockdown of ZFR might provide a novel alternative to targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer and deserves further investigation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology , Gene Knockdown Techniques/methods , Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics , Pancreatic Neoplasms/metabolism , Tetrazolium Salts , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Blotting, Western , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Lentivirus/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Flow Cytometry/methods , Formazans , Neoplasm Invasiveness/genetics , Neoplasm Invasiveness/pathology
19.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 49(7): e5313, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951690

ABSTRACT

Ascosphaera apis is a bee pathogen that causes bee larvae infection disease, to which treatment is not yet well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal susceptibility in vitro against A. apis and to identify a new antifungal agent for this pathogen through minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and western blot analysis. Macelignan had 1.56 and 3.125 μg/mL MIC against A. apis after 24 and 48 h, respectively, exhibiting the strongest growth inhibition against A. apis among the tested compounds (corosolic acid, dehydrocostus lactone, loganic acid, tracheloside, fangchinoline and emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside). Furthermore, macelignan showed a narrow-ranged spectrum against various fungal strains without any mammalian cell cytotoxicity. In spite of miconazole having powerful broad-ranged anti-fungal activity including A. apis, it demonstrated strong cytotoxicity. Therefore, even if macelignan alone was effective as an antifungal agent to treat A. apis, combined treatment with miconazole was more useful to overcome toxicity, drug resistance occurrence and cost effectiveness. Finally, HOG1 was revealed as a target molecule of macelignan in the anti-A. apis activity by inhibiting phosphorylation using S. cerevisiae as a model system. Based on our results, macelignan, a food-grade antimicrobial compound, would be an effective antifungal agent against A. apis infection in bees.


Subject(s)
Animals , Ascomycota/drug effects , Bees/microbiology , Lignans/pharmacology , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/drug effects , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/drug effects , Antifungal Agents/pharmacology , Tetrazolium Salts , Time Factors , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Blotting, Western , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/analysis , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/analysis , Drug Synergism , Formazans , Larva/drug effects , Larva/microbiology , Larva/pathogenicity , Mycoses/drug therapy
20.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(8): 996-1002, Dec. 2015. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-769833

ABSTRACT

Chagas disease, which is caused by the intracellular protozoanTrypanosoma cruzi, is a serious health problem in Latin America. The heart is one of the major organs affected by this parasitic infection. The pathogenesis of tissue remodelling, particularly regarding cardiomyocyte behaviour after parasite infection, and the molecular mechanisms that occur immediately following parasite entry into host cells are not yet completely understood. Previous studies have reported that the establishment of parasitism is connected to the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), which controls important steps in cellular metabolism by regulating the production of the second messenger phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate. Particularly, the tumour suppressor PTEN is a negative regulator of PI3K signalling. However, mechanistic details of the modulatory activity of PTEN on Chagas disease have not been elucidated. To address this question, H9c2 cells were infected with T. cruzi Berenice 62 strain and the expression of a specific set of microRNAs (miRNAs) were investigated. Our cellular model demonstrated that miRNA-190b is correlated to the decrease of cellular viability rates by negatively modulating PTEN protein expression in T. cruzi-infected cells.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Down-Regulation , MicroRNAs/physiology , Myocytes, Cardiac/parasitology , Protein Biosynthesis , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/metabolism , Trypanosoma cruzi/metabolism , Blotting, Western , Cell Line , Cell Survival , Formazans , Genes, Reporter , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Phosphorylation , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/genetics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Tetrazolium Salts , Trypanosoma cruzi/classification
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