Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
J Mol Biol ; 434(6): 167277, 2022 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061566

ABSTRACT

Establishment of the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral state provides a crucial initial line of defense against viral infection. Numerous genes that contribute to this antiviral state remain to be identified. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we screened an original library of 1156 siRNAs targeting 386 individual curated human genes in stimulated microglial cells infected with Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging RNA virus that belongs to the flavivirus genus. The screen recovered twenty-one potential host proteins that modulate ZIKV replication in an IFN-dependent manner, including the previously known IFITM3 and LY6E. Further characterization contributed to delineate the spectrum of action of these genes towards other pathogenic RNA viruses, including Hepatitis C virus and SARS-CoV-2. Our data revealed that APOL3 acts as a proviral factor for ZIKV and several other related and unrelated RNA viruses. In addition, we showed that MTA2, a chromatin remodeling factor, possesses potent flavivirus-specific antiviral functions induced by IFN. Our work identified previously unrecognized genes that modulate the replication of RNA viruses in an IFN-dependent manner, opening new perspectives to target weakness points in the life cycle of these viruses.


Subject(s)
Flavivirus , Interferons , Virus Replication , Apolipoproteins L/genetics , Apolipoproteins L/metabolism , Flavivirus/physiology , Histone Deacetylases/genetics , Histone Deacetylases/metabolism , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Zika Virus/physiology
2.
Hum Genomics ; 16(1): 33, 2022 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The tripartite motif containing (TRIM)-22 participates in innate immune responses and exhibits antiviral activities. The present study aimed to assess of the relationship between TRIM22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and clinical parameters with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection severity. METHODS: TRIM22 polymorphisms (rs7113258, rs7935564, and rs1063303) were genotyped using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in 495 dead and 497 improved severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-positive patients. RESULTS: In this study, the frequencies of TRIM22 rs1063303 GG, rs7935564 GG, and rs7113258 TT were significantly higher in dead patients than in improved patients, and higher viral load with low PCR Ct value was noticed in dead patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), cholesterol, PCR Ct value, and lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and also higher levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and TRIM22 rs1063303 GG, rs7113258 TT, and rs3824949 GG genotypes were related to the COVID-19 infection severity. CONCLUSION: Our finding proved the probable relationship between the COVID-19 infection severity with the genotypes of TRIM22 SNPs and clinical parameters. More research is required worldwide to show the association between the COVID-19 infection severity and host genetic factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Minor Histocompatibility Antigens , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Repressor Proteins , Tripartite Motif Proteins , Humans , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Minor Histocompatibility Antigens/genetics , Repressor Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tripartite Motif Proteins/genetics
3.
Dis Markers ; 2022: 6780710, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868808

ABSTRACT

Background: To date (14 January 2022), the incidence and related mortality rate of COVID-19 in America, Europe, and Asia despite administrated of billions doses of many approved vaccines are still higher than in Egypt. Epigenetic alterations mediate the effects of environmental factors on the regulation of genetic material causing many diseases. Objective: We aimed to explore the methylation status of HeyL promoter, a downstream transcription factor in Notch signal, an important regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation blood, pulmonary epithelial, and nerves cells. Methods: Our objective was achieved by DNA sequencing of the product from methyl-specific PCR of HeyL promoter after bisulfite modification of DNA extracted from the blood samples of 30 COVID-19 patients and 20 control health subjects and studying its association with clinical-pathological biomarkers. Results: We found that the HeyL promoter was partial-methylated in Egyptian COVID-19 patients and control healthy subjects compared to full methylated one that was published in GenBank. We identified unmethylated CpG (TG) flanking the response elements within HeyL promoter in Egyptian COVID-19 patients and control healthy subjects vs. methylated CpG (CG) in reference sequence (GenBank). Also, we observed that the frequency of partial-methylated HeyL promoter was higher in COVID-19 patients and associated with aging, fever, severe pneumonia, ageusia/anosmia, and dry cough compared to control healthy subjects. Conclusion: We concluded that hypomethylated HeyL promoter in Egyptian population may facilitate the binding of transcription factors to their binding sites, thus enhancing its regulatory action on the blood, pulmonary epithelium, and nerves cells in contrast to full methylated one that was published in GenBank; thus, addition of demethylating agents to the treatment protocol of COVID-19 may improve the clinical outcomes. Administration of therapy must be based on determination of methylation status of HeyL, a novel prognostic marker for severe illness in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors , COVID-19 , Repressor Proteins , Base Sequence , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , DNA Methylation , Egypt/epidemiology , Humans , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Repressor Proteins/genetics
4.
Molecules ; 25(12)2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389454

ABSTRACT

Viruses can be spread from one person to another; therefore, they may cause disorders in many people, sometimes leading to epidemics and even pandemics. New, previously unstudied viruses and some specific mutant or recombinant variants of known viruses constantly appear. An example is a variant of coronaviruses (CoV) causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), named SARS-CoV-2. Some antiviral drugs, such as remdesivir as well as antiretroviral drugs including darunavir, lopinavir, and ritonavir are suggested to be effective in treating disorders caused by SARS-CoV-2. There are data on the utilization of antiretroviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Since there are many studies aimed at the identification of the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and the development of novel therapeutic approaches against HIV-1, we used HIV-1 for our case study to identify possible molecular pathways shared by SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1. We applied a text and data mining workflow and identified a list of 46 targets, which can be essential for the development of infections caused by SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1. We show that SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1 share some molecular pathways involved in inflammation, immune response, cell cycle regulation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Data Mining/methods , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antigens, Differentiation/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Complement System Proteins/genetics , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Regulation , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV-1/drug effects , HIV-1/immunology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Inflammation , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Interleukins/genetics , Interleukins/immunology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/immunology
5.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2203: 187-204, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729907

ABSTRACT

Biotin-based proximity labeling circumvents major pitfalls of classical biochemical approaches to identify protein-protein interactions. It consists of enzyme-catalyzed biotin tags ubiquitously apposed on proteins located in close proximity of the labeling enzyme, followed by affinity purification and identification of biotinylated proteins by mass spectrometry. Here we outline the methods by which the molecular microenvironment of the coronavirus replicase/transcriptase complex (RTC), i.e., proteins located within a close perimeter of the RTC, can be determined by different proximity labeling approaches using BirAR118G (BioID), TurboID, and APEX2. These factors represent a molecular signature of coronavirus RTCs and likely contribute to the viral life cycle, thereby constituting attractive targets for the development of antiviral intervention strategies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Enzymes/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Proteomics/methods , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Ascorbate Peroxidases/genetics , Biotinylation , Carbon-Nitrogen Ligases/genetics , Cell Line , Coronavirus/genetics , Enzymes/metabolism , Escherichia coli Proteins/genetics , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Microorganisms, Genetically-Modified , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics
6.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0244025, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992706

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV-2 regularly infect host tissues that express antiviral proteins (AVPs) in abundance. Understanding how they evolve to adapt or evade host immune responses is important in the effort to control the spread of infection. Two AVPs that may shape viral genomes are the zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) and the apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3). The former binds to CpG dinucleotides to facilitate the degradation of viral transcripts while the latter frequently deaminates C into U residues which could generate notable viral sequence variations. We tested the hypothesis that both APOBEC3 and ZAP impose selective pressures that shape the genome of an infecting coronavirus. Our investigation considered a comprehensive number of publicly available genomes for seven coronaviruses (SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS infecting Homo sapiens, Bovine CoV infecting Bos taurus, MHV infecting Mus musculus, HEV infecting Sus scrofa, and CRCoV infecting Canis lupus familiaris). We show that coronaviruses that regularly infect tissues with abundant AVPs have CpG-deficient and U-rich genomes; whereas those that do not infect tissues with abundant AVPs do not share these sequence hallmarks. Among the coronaviruses surveyed herein, CpG is most deficient in SARS-CoV-2 and a temporal analysis showed a marked increase in C to U mutations over four months of SARS-CoV-2 genome evolution. Furthermore, the preferred motifs in which these C to U mutations occur are the same as those subjected to APOBEC3 editing in HIV-1. These results suggest that both ZAP and APOBEC3 shape the SARS-CoV-2 genome: ZAP imposes a strong CpG avoidance, and APOBEC3 constantly edits C to U. Evolutionary pressures exerted by host immune systems onto viral genomes may motivate novel strategies for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Coronavirus/genetics , Cytidine Deaminase/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/genetics , APOBEC Deaminases , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cattle , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Dogs , Evolution, Molecular , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , /pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Swine/virology
7.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235987, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690896

ABSTRACT

Development of novel approaches for regulating the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) is becoming increasingly important within the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic since these enzymes play a crucial role in cell infection. In this work we searched for putative ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression regulation networks mediated by various miRNA isoforms (isomiR) across different human organs using publicly available paired miRNA/mRNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. As a result, we identified several miRNA families targeting ACE2 and TMPRSS2 genes in multiple tissues. In particular, we found that lysine-specific demethylase 5B (JARID1B), encoded by the KDM5B gene, can indirectly affect ACE2 / TMPRSS2 expression by repressing transcription of hsa-let-7e / hsa-mir-125a and hsa-mir-141 / hsa-miR-200 miRNA families which are targeting these genes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Gene Expression Regulation , MicroRNAs/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , 3' Untranslated Regions , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Isoforms/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA-Seq , Repressor Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis
8.
Mol Cell Endocrinol ; 515: 110917, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661768

ABSTRACT

Obesity patients are more susceptible to develop COVID-19 severe outcome due to the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the viral infection. ACE2 is regulated in the human cells by different genes associated with increased (TLR3, HAT1, HDAC2, KDM5B, SIRT1, RAB1A, FURIN and ADAM10) or decreased (TRIB3) virus replication. RNA-seq data revealed 14857 genes expressed in human subcutaneous adipocytes, including genes mentioned above. Irisin treatment increased by 3-fold the levels of TRIB3 transcript and decreased the levels of other genes. The decrease in FURIN and ADAM10 expression enriched diverse biological processes, including extracellular structure organization. Our results, in human subcutaneous adipocytes cell culture, indicate a positive effect of irisin on the expression of multiple genes related to viral infection by SARS-CoV-2; furthermore, translatable for other tissues and organs targeted by the novel coronavirus and present, thus, promising approaches for the treatment of COVID-19 infection as therapeutic strategy to decrease ACE2 regulatory genes.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes/drug effects , Fibronectins/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , ADAM10 Protein/genetics , ADAM10 Protein/metabolism , Adipocytes/cytology , Adipocytes/metabolism , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/genetics , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Fibronectins/genetics , Fibronectins/metabolism , Furin/genetics , Furin/metabolism , Gene Ontology , Histone Acetyltransferases/genetics , Histone Acetyltransferases/metabolism , Histone Deacetylase 2/genetics , Histone Deacetylase 2/metabolism , Humans , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Models, Biological , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Obesity/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sirtuin 1/genetics , Sirtuin 1/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 3/metabolism , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
9.
Eur J Med Chem ; 203: 112653, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645168

ABSTRACT

Flavaglines are cyclopenta[b]benzofurans found in plants of the genus Aglaia, several species of which are used in traditional Chinese medicine. These compounds target the initiation factor of translation eIF4A and the scaffold proteins prohibitins-1 and 2 (PHB1/2) to exert various pharmacological activities, including antiviral effects against several types of viruses, including coronaviruses. This review is focused on the antiviral effects of flavaglines and their therapeutic potential against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).


Subject(s)
Aglaia/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Animals , COVID-19 , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4A/drug effects , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Pandemics , Prohibitins , Repressor Proteins/drug effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL